Understanding Commercial Sex Policy: A Global and US Perspective

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Hiebert Lounge
72 East Concord Street
Boston

The form of commercial sex that some people call prostitution and others call sex work is presently illegal to sell and to buy in the United States, with the exception of 11 counties in Nevada where it is legalized. The public health community is not unified in its perspective on policy options. The purpose of this symposium is to use a public health framework to consider the potential advantages and disadvantages of legalizing or decriminalizing commercial sex in the United States. Speakers will address the harms of criminalizing the buying and selling of sex as well as the need to reduce human trafficking. Lessons learned in the global context will be considered. The objective of the symposium is to equip attendees with a richer understanding of the issue and the likely implications of supporting the legislative options under consideration.

MORNING SESSION 2


AFTERNOON SESSION


Agenda

8:30 a.m. – 8:50 a.m.
Breakfast and Informal Greetings

8:50 a.m. – 9 a.m.
WELCOME AND OPENING REMARKS
Sandro Galea

Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health

Emily Rothman

Associate Professor, Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health


9 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
SEXUAL COMMERCE IN NEOLIBERAL TIMES: POLICY, POLITICS AND NEVADA’S LEGAL BROTHELS
Barbara G. Brents

Professor, Sociology, University of Nevada, Las Vegas


9:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
GENDER EQUALITY AND COMMERCIAL SEX IN THE GLOBAL CONTEXT
Saniye Gülser Corat

Director, Division for Gender Equality, Office of the Director-General, UNESCO


10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Break

10:45 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
CHILD TRAFFICKING AS A HUMAN RIGHTS AND RACIAL JUSTICE ISSUE
Malika Saada Saar

Senior Counsel on Civil and Human Rights, Google


11:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
SEXUAL LABOR AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE
Emily A. Owens

Assistant Professor, History, Brown University


12 p.m. – 12:30 p.m.
THE REALITY OF THE SEX INDUSTRY FROM A SURVIVOR’S PERSPECTIVE 
Audrey Morrissey

Associate Director, My Life My Choice, Justice Resource Institute


12:30 p.m. – 12:45 p.m.
Pick up boxed lunch. 

12:45 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
VARIOUS POLICIES, DIVERGENT HEALTH OUTCOMES: UNRESOLVED TENSIONS IN THE FIELD OF COMMERCIAL SEX
Sharon S. Oselin

Associate Director, Presley Center for Crime and Justice Studies and Associate Professor, Sociology, University of California, Riverside


1:30 p.m. – 2 p.m.
LOST IN TRAFFIC: SEX WORK, TRAFFICKING, AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Bobbi Taylor

Chair, Steering Committee, Massachusetts Transgender Political Coalition


2 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
DECRIMINALIZING PROSTITUTION TO IMPROVE PUBLIC HEALTH AND ADVANCE HUMAN RIGHTS: AN EVIDENCE-BASED POLICY?
Michael Shively

Senior Associate, Abt Associates


2:30 p.m. – 3 p.m.
LOOKING TO THE FUTURE: HELPING ADOLESCENTS SITUATE THEMSELVES IN RELATION TO COMMERCIAL SEX 
Jeff R. Temple

Professor and Director, Behavioral Health and Research, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Texas Medical Branch