Category: Center for Sharing Public Health Services

UPCOMING WEBINAR:

August 27th, 2019

While it’s not unusual for decision-makers to consider cross-jurisdictional sharing (CJS) primarily as a tool to reduce costs, in reality the greatest value of these arrangements comes in the form of a more effective public health presence in the community.

Join the Center for Sharing Public Health Services for this webinar, where Health Director Paul Pettit will describe how he used the opportunities presented by combining management teams to gain new efficiencies and make practice improvements for two county health departments in rural western New York.

September 13, 2019

1 p.m. Eastern / 12 noon Central /

11 a.m. Mountain / 10 a.m. Pacific

Register Now!

Comprehensive Assistance for Shared Services (COMPASS)

May 31st, 2019

COMPASS provides access to tools, methods, and models to help you explore, prepare for, plan, implement, and improve a CJS arrangement. These are steps along the Roadmap to Develop Cross-Jurisdictional Sharing Initiatives developed by the Center for Sharing Public Health Services to assist public health agencies and policymakers as they consider and adopt CJS approaches.

 

Cross-jurisdictional sharing (CJS) is a strategy that involves collaboration between health departments across jurisdictional boundaries. The purpose of CJS is to deliver public health services and address problems that cannot easily be solved by a single organization or jurisdiction.

  to learn more about the three primary components of CJS.

Success Factors for Cross-Jurisdictional Sharing: What Does It Take to Succeed?

May 31st, 2019

Overview:

By collaborating with other jurisdictions and sharing capacity and services in cross-jurisdictional sharing (CJS) arrangements, public health departments can create economies of scale that make the most of existing resources. And yet, even the strongest partnerships can be challenged when engaging in a collaboration. In this webinar, senior staff from the Center for Sharing Public Health Services described 10 factors that promote successful CJS efforts, along with field-based examples of each one.

Webinar Resources:

Download the webinar slides: Success Factors for CJS: What Does It Take to Succeed?
Learn more about the Success Factors.

Q & A Resources:

Participants asked several questions during the webinar. Two questions are shown below, along with links to resources relevant to the questions.

  1. When it comes to getting senior staff to communicate their buy-in, how can you help get them to do that?
  2. Broad question – 10 years from now, what do you think the level of uptake of CJS arrangements will be? Are there certain key drivers we should keep an eye on?

 


Webinar Objectives:

  1. Describe the success factors.
  2. Understand how the presence and absence of each can affect the establishment of a CJS arrangement.

 

Webinar Speakers:

Gianfranco Pezzino
Director
Center for Sharing Public Health Services

Grace Gorenflo
Senior Project Consultant
Center for Sharing Public Health Services

Pat Libbey
Senior Project Consultant
Center for Sharing Public Health Services

Public Health Staff Sharing

April 30th, 2019

Case studies from Minnesota and New Jersey illustrate how local jurisdictions can implement staff sharing arrangements for more efficient local public health services. The research provides important insight on key challenges, financial consideration, outcomes, and lessons learned.

Webinar: State Health Departments and Cross-Jurisdictional Sharing: How state health departments can help drive efficiency and effectiveness at the local level

September 19th, 2018

WEBINAR
 
State Health Departments and Cross-Jurisdictional Sharing:
How state health departments can help drive 
efficiency and effectiveness at the local level 
 
You are invited to participate in a webinar hosted by the Center for Sharing Public Health Services focused on state health departments' role in local cross-jurisdictional sharing.
Date: October 9, 2018
Time: 1 p.m. Eastern
12 noon Central
11 a.m. Mountain
10 a.m. Pacific
Title: State Health Departments and Cross-Jurisdictional Sharing:
How state health departments can help drive efficiency and effectiveness at the local level
Overview:
Cross-jurisdictional sharing (CJS) models typically are established to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of public health programs and outcomes. CJS arrangements may be initiated by local health departments in response to local needs. In addition, state health departments may use CJS to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of state-funded programs or otherwise make system-wide changes.
This webinar will provide an overview of ways in which state health departments can support and initiate CJS arrangements at the local level. It will provide specific examples of how this has been done in Minnesota and Montana. Participants will have an opportunity to pose questions and share their experiences.
Objectives: 1.) Describe state health department strategies that support local health department efforts to establish and operate CJS arrangements.

 

2.) Describe state health department strategies that use a CJS approach to improve the delivery of state-funded public health services.

 

Guest Speakers:
Michael Fraser
Chief Executive Officer
Association of State and Territorial Health Officials
Debra Burns
Director
Centers for Health Equity and Community Health
Minnesota Department of Health
Mandi Zanto
Healthy Lifestyles Section Supervisor
Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Bureau
Public Health and Safety Division
Montana Department of Health and Human Services
Intended
Audience:
The webinar is intended for state health departments, local health departments, policymakers and related state-based associations. 

 

Event Registration for the Webinar on October 9, 2018
 
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WEBINAR: Staff Sharing Arrangements for Local Public Health

July 17th, 2018

Join a webinar hosted by the Center for State and Local Government Excellence in collaboration with the Center for Sharing Public Health Services to review recent research that examines the issue of staff sharing arrangements for local public health.

What:  Webinar | Research Review: Staff Sharing Arrangements for Local Public Health
Date:   Thursday, July 19, 2018
Time:   1:00 PM ET
Register at no charge: http://bit.ly/2txX4QQ
Download research: http://bit.ly/2KoJl5m

Just as residents might commute from one jurisdiction to another, public health challenges also travel freely, whether stemming from food poisoning, substance abuse, environmental exposures, or communicable diseases. Rather than take an insular approach to addressing just the issues in one singular area, local public health officials have considered, and in some cases implemented, partnerships as an effective means of containing existing and potential problems, expanding organizational capacity, and effectively managing public health expenditures.

It might seem beneficial to share staff between jurisdictions, but on a practical level, when exploring the concept, there can be a natural hesitation related to existing governance structures, the history between and culture of the jurisdictions, the equitable provision of services, and underlying fiscal arrangements, among other factors.

To help inform these considerations, this report offers a series of case studies on shared staffing arrangements in local public health organizations. These cases were selected for study based on a national environmental scan of arrangements in place and with attention to variation in location, size of jurisdictions, and type of local government. The shared positions covered in these case studies run the gamut from health directors to physicians, nurses, inspectors, social workers, and administrative staff. 

 

Implementation and Impact Measurement Program

May 4th, 2018

In 2015 the Center for Sharing Public Health Services developed a model to measure the impact of cross-jurisdictional sharing (CJS) arrangements on service and program effectiveness and efficiency. The Center selected four projects that had recently implemented a CJS arrangement–located in Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin–with the goal of testing the model it had developed. Over a period of 18 months, these four sites conducted activities aimed at measuring changes in the effectiveness and efficiency of a program or service for which they had recently implemented a sharing agreement. All projects completed their work and demonstrated that the impact of CJS initiatives can be measured using the systematic approach developed by the Center.

 

Read More: Cross-Jurisdictional Sharing Implementation and Impact Measurement Program: Final Report

Small Grants Program 2018

February 28th, 2018

The Center for Sharing Public Health Services (the "Center") is offering small grants to organizations that wish to explore, plan, implement or improve some specific aspects of cross-jurisdictional sharing (CJS) in public health.

This opportunity is available for the following groups: a) public health agencies including Tribal Public Health; b) organizations representing policymakers with the authority to enter into public health CJS agreements; c) designated agents of a) or b); and d) research institutions or coalitions.

Proposals must fall into one of three categories (described in more detail in the RFP):

  1. CJS initiatives aimed to explore, plan, implement or improve a specific CJS arrangement in public health practice (additional eligibility criteria in the RFP);
  2. Projects that encourage or demonstrate on a small scale the use of CJS as a systems change tool for public health service delivery; or
  3. Research projects that will add to the body of evidence for public health CJS within the Center's identified priority areas.

For complete information and to apply, visit their website

Measuring the Impact of Cross-Jurisdictional Sharing in Public Health

October 3rd, 2017

To better understand the impact of cross-jurisdictional sharing (CJS) among public health agencies, CJS teams need to identify suitable measures and measurement processes. This document provides instructions to develop and implement an impact measurement plan. The document contains only efficiency and effectiveness impact measures and measurement processes that have been developed and are supported by the Center for Sharing Public Health Services and are applicable to select public health program, service and function areas.

Available online: http://phsharing.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Measuring-Impact-CJS.pdf

It is included in the CJS Resource Library under the categories listed below. Select a link to find other resources in that category.

  • Monitoring and Improving: The document provides guidance on measuring and demonstrating the impact of a CJS arrangement, by identifying and recording “baseline” and “follow-up” measures.

This resource is also linked to the Roadmap. Select a link below to read more about each area.

  • Monitoring / Phase Two: The document provides guidance on measuring and demonstrating the impact of a CJS arrangement, by identifying and recording “baseline” and “follow-up” measures.
  • Monitoring and Improving / Phase Three: The document provides guidance on measuring and demonstrating the impact of a CJS arrangement.

Center for Sharing Public Health Services Announces Newest Grantees

July 21st, 2017

AllGranteesMapSmallEleven teams will focus on cross-jurisdictional sharing in public health

The Center for Sharing Public Health Services (the Center) has selected eleven public health teams to participate in a new funding initiative focused on cross-jurisdictional sharing (CJS) in public health. CJS occurs when jurisdictions, such as counties or cities, collaborate to deliver public health services across boundaries. By working together, public health agencies can build economies of scale that improve effectiveness and efficiency.

As part of the program, the eleven teams will receive grant funding and one-on-one technical assistance from the Center. The Center will get the opportunity to observe progress and to capture learning that it will use to develop and disseminate new tools and resources and to provide technical assistance to other jurisdictions that are considering or adopting CJS approaches.

“The teams were selected because their work focuses on areas the Center has prioritized for further study,” explained Gianfranco Pezzino, co-director of the Center. “For example, several of the teams are composed of smaller jurisdictions interested in using CJS strategies to provide a broader range of public health services.”

“In another example, some of the teams are working toward system-wide public health improvement at the state level, using a CJS approach,” added Patrick Libbey, who is also a co-director of the Center.

The following public health teams have been selected to participate in the new program:

  • Colorado: West Central Public Health Partnership—This partnership, which comprises six frontier and rural counties, is seeking to improve communications among member counties and to assess the effectiveness of and capacity for shared services and activities. The following counties participate in the partnership: Delta, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Montrose, Ouray and San Miguel.
  • Colorado: San Luis Valley Public Health Partnership—This partnership, which comprises three frontier and three rural counties, will develop and implement a cross-jurisdictional data collection and management system. The following counties participate in the partnership: Alamosa, Conejos, Costilla, Mineral, Saguache and Rio Grande.
  • Florida: Capital Consortium—Ten health departments will evaluate how well their shared information technology (IT) support model is performing and identify needed improvements. The initiative covers Leon, Calhoun, Liberty, Gadsden, Jefferson, Madison, Taylor, Wakulla, Franklin and Gulf Counties. It also involves the Florida Department of Health and the Florida Capital Consortium IT Regional Office.
  • Kansas: American Heart Association—The American Heart Association in Kansas is working to plan and implement a data-sharing arrangement among the four federally recognized Native American Tribes in the state—Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, Kickapoo Tribe in Kansas, Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation, and the Sac and Fox Nation of Missouri in Kansas and Nebraska.
  • Kentucky: Tri-County Fitness Challenge—Three local health departments will develop an agreement to support future CJS efforts, starting with a tri-county fitness challenge. The initiative covers Bourbon, Clark and Montgomery Counties, with assistance from the University of Kentucky.
  • Nebraska: Nebraska Association of Local Health Departments (NALHD)—NALHD is leading a project to develop a model website for local health departments. It will be pilot tested by Central District Health Department, North Central District Health Department, Northeast Nebraska Public Health Department, Panhandle Public Health District and South Heartland District Health Department. Additional health departments may choose to launch similar websites in the future.
  • Ohio: Ohio Public Health Partnership (OPHP)—OPHP is a coalition comprising the Association of Ohio Health Commissioners (AOHC), Ohio Association of Boards of Health (OABH), Ohio Environmental Health Association (OEHA), Ohio Public Health Association (OPHA) and Ohio Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE). OPHP will analyze the extent to which local health departments seek to share foundational public health services that meet the Public Health Accreditation Board’s standards and measures. It will then develop a template MOU that can be scaled to facilitate CJS arrangements for these services.
  • Oregon: Clatsop and Columbia Counties—Health departments and behavioral health agencies in Clatsop and Columbia Counties will develop a regional model of a case referral and management program for kids with special health needs.
  • Oregon: Polk and Marion Counties—Polk County and contiguous Marion County will explore the feasibility of cross-jurisdictional sharing and anticipate identifying a specific shared service in the process.
  • Washington: Washington State Department of Health—Washington State Department of Health is collaborating with Public Health Centers for Excellence and Washington State Association of Local Public Health Officials to improve the statewide immunization program. The project partners will develop a pilot program to test a regional approach to administering the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program and the Assessment, Feedback, Incentives eXchange (AFIX) program’s quality improvement activities.
  • Washington, D.C.: Center for State and Local Government Excellence (SLGE)—SLGE, a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that helps state and local governments become excellent employers so they can attract and retain talented public servants, will develop three case studies focused on sharing local public health department personnel.

The Center, which serves as a national resource on CJS, is managed by the Kansas Health Institute with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The National Network of Public Health Institutes is the Center’s administrative partner for this effort and awards and administers all grants.

Download a full copy of the press release.