Workplace Safety – Programs & Services

Please see below for information about the Workplace Safety programs and services of most relevance to you.

Work Space


Information about setting up safe working environments and proper posture for people in the lab or at a desk to prevent injury and strain.

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Information about indoor air flow and air quality assessments.

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Information about the potential health risks of mold exposure and tips to prevent the active growth of mold

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Many local, state, and federal agencies require that permits be obtained for projects, equipment, and discharges. EHS and other University and Hospital departments maintain many permits and licenses.

If the work that you will perform requires additional permits, EHS can guide you on when, why and how to apply for a given permit.

Permit Examples Include:

  • Air and water discharge and other environmental
  • Assembly areas
  • Building and demolition Permits
  • DEA Controlled Substances
  • Hazardous Materials Permits
  • Laboratory registrations
  • Laser Use Permits
  • Occupancy Permits
  • Radioactive Material Use Permits
  • USDA import/export

Work Practices & Procedures


Information about the potential health risks of asbestos exposure, including the increased risk to smokers, and the Boston University/Boston Medical Center Asbestos Management Plan

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Guidance about the safe use and risks of biohazardous materials and organisms, including all infectious agents or biologically derived infectious materials that present either a risk or a potential risk to the health of humans or animals, either directly through infection or indirectly through damage to the environment.

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Information about programs in place to a) protect the safety of all those working on or visiting the areas in and around construction sites and b) ensure compliance with OSHA and other regulations and standards

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Guidance in proper electrical safety to avoid fires, electric shock, and electrocution

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Guidance to minimize environmental impacts and maintain compliance with environmental regulations in the University’s educational, research, and medical facilities

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Guidance to ensure that the University community is safe from fires and ensure compliance with the appropriate fire codes and fire safety regulations

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Information about the properties, hazards, and protective measures for each chemical and its use

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Guidance in the selection, use, care, and storage of stepladders, fixed ladders, and job-made ladders

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Information about the safe use of power tools and equipment

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When selecting the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) in your work area, first identify the type of hazards you'll be working with.

  1. Are there chemical, biological, or radiological hazards present?
  2. Are there splash or vapor hazards?
  3. Are there unique PPE fit factors that need to be considered?
  4. Will you be working in a location that is very hot or very cold?
  5. Is there a need for impact protection or fall protection?

No particular type of personal protective equipment (PPE) is correct for every task; therefore, it is best to consult with experts. Use the NIOSH PPE selector to help determine what type of PPE you should use.



Guidance on to ensure that the University community is safe from overexposure to radiofrequency (RF) and on related signage

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Information about medical clearance, fit testing, and proper use of respirators for employees, staff, and students

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