Sharing information through stories is unique to our experience as people. In many ways, it’s essential to being human.

Storytelling entertains us, sure, but it also inspires and enlightens. It fosters cooperation and social norms. It prepares us for future difficulties. And in a 24/7 digital era, it’s more vital than ever.

At Boston University’s College of Communication, you’ll gain the storytelling skills to shape the world’s conversations. You might learn how to create a documentary film or code an interactive website. Report breaking news or develop a public-relations campaign. Design an advertisement or write a screenplay. Or perhaps you might study how stories are told, delving into the forces driving emerging media that influence how we think and act.

No matter your focus, you’ll be guided by our world-class faculty — terrific teachers active in their fields. Among them: award-winning journalists, agency CEOs, and network television directors.

Communication skills alone aren’t enough, of course. The quality of what you’re communicating must be high, and that requires deeper knowledge. That’s why you’ll also be able to soak up fresh insights and develop a richer understanding on a variety of subjects from the leading experts at Boston University. Accredited by the prestigious Association of American Universities, Boston University has been educating students for more than 150 years.

Want more proof? Our COM alumni network of more than 30,000 graduates includes winners of top awards — Pulitzers, Emmys, Clios — as well as CEOs, studio heads, and stars in TV and radio. Many of today’s leaders began their career journeys in the halls of COM.

And have I mentioned we’re located in Boston, one of the world’s great centers for both intellectual journeys and fun?

Whatever area of communications interests you, COM provides the opportunities, professors, network and environment for you to achieve your career ambitions.

The world needs a trusted and free press in all media; advertising and public relations performed to the highest standards of effectiveness and integrity; compelling film and TV that informs and uplifts; and research to help us understand better how emerging media are transforming all of these disciplines.

In short, the world needs storytellers. Maybe you’re one of them.

I hope to welcome you to campus soon.

Mariette DiChristina
Dean
College of Communication