BUCLD 44 Schedule and Abstracts

THE 44TH BOSTON UNIVERSITY CONFERENCE ON LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT

NOVEMBER 7–10, 2019
GEORGE SHERMAN UNION, BOSTON UNIVERSITY

Registration opens at 8:00am each day starting on Friday.

Please note that this year’s Student Workshop will be held on Thursday, November 7th following the Society for Language Development Symposium at 6:30pm, with refreshments available starting at 6.

PDF version of the schedule with abstracts.

Fri | Sat | Sun | Alternates | Fri posters | Sat posters

Thursday, November 7, 2019

STUDENT WORKSHOP (East Balcony)
6:30 – 7:30
Careers in the Field of Communication Sciences and Disorders*: Why and How
*also known as Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences.
Sudha Arunachalam (New York University)


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Friday, November 8, 2019

9:00 – 5:00
BOOK EXHIBIT (Ziskind Lounge)
Session A
(East Balcony)
Session B
(Conference Auditorium)
Session C
(Terrace Lounge)
9:00
The development of gendered speech in children: patterns and predictors.
B. Munson, N. Lackas, K. Koeppe
Young Children Build Syntactic Predictions During Language Processing and Use Them to Learn Novel-Word Meanings.
N. Havron, A. Fiévet, M. Babineau, A. de Carvalho, A. Christophe
Bayesian analysis as alternative to Frequentist methods: A demonstration with data from language-impaired children’s relative clause processing.
Y. Haendler, R. Lassotta, A. Adelt, N. Stadie, F. Burchert, F. Adani
9:30
Factors influencing infant volubility and turn-taking in bilingual infants.
K. Xu, A. Orena, Y. Ruan, L. Polka
Neural synchrony predicts novel word learning from storybooks.
E. Piazza, A. Cohen, C. Lew-Williams
The acquisition of prosodic focus-identification: The role of variation in focus-marking.
B. Surányi, L. Pintér
10:00
Acquisition of phonological variation: Evidence from artificial language learning.
B. Sneller, E. Newport
The effect of code switching on word learning in bilingual 5-year-olds.
M. Brouillard, D. Dubé, K. Byers-Heinlein
The emergence of (reduced and full) clefts in French L1.
K. Lahousse, M. Jourdain
10:30 – 11:00
BREAK (Ziskind Lounge)
Session A
(East Balcony)
Session B
(Conference Auditorium)
Session C
(Terrace Lounge)
11:00
The Impact of Bilingualism on Theory of Mind and Executive Functions in Children with Typical Development and with Autism Spectrum Disorders.
E. Baldimtsi, E. Peristeri, I. Tsimpli, S. Durrlemann
Are infants sensitive to informant reliability in word learning?
A. Tripp, N. Feldman, W. Idsardi
Tamil-speaking children do not prefer iconic adverbial sentences over non-iconic ones.
L. de Ruiter, V. Priyadharshini, A. Etz, S. Kuppuraj
11:30
Child cross-linguistic influence and adult L1 transfer: same or different?.
S. Berends, A. Hulk, J. Schaeffer, P. Sleeman
The development of pragmatic reasoning from multiple information sources.
M. Bohn, M. Tessler, M. Merrick, M. Frank
Redundant morphological marking benefits child learners.
S. Tal, I. Arnon
12:00
Parental Language, Functional Utterance Type, and Play Context Impact Children’s Usage of an Endangered Ancestral Language.
C. Lowry, P. Yuksel, P. Brooks
“It’s in your box!” –– Personal pronoun comprehension in children with ASD.
H. Clancy, A. He, R. Luyster, S. Arunachalam
Multiword units predict children’s non-inversion errors in wh-question formation.
S. McCauley, C. Bannard, A. Theakston, M. Davis, T. Cameron-Faulkner, B. Ambridge
NIH/NSF FUNDING SYMPOSIUM (Metcalf Large)
12:30 – 2:00
NSF/NIH funding workshop.
Joan Maling (National Science Foundation), Brett Miller (National Institutes of Health)
Session A
(East Balcony)
Session B
(Conference Auditorium)
Session C
(Terrace Lounge)
2:00
Children’s and adults’ use of pragmatic inference to learn about the social world.
N. Vasilyeva, M. Ellwood-Lowe, M. Srinivasan
Preverbal infants’ sensitivity to grammatical dependencies.
M. Babineau, A. Christophe
Hierarchical structure dependence in infants at the early stage of syntactic acquisition.
R. Shi, E. Emond, S. Badri
2:30
Preschool children generate pragmatic inferences from both words and pictures.
C. Richards, A. Kampa, A. Papafragou
Specificity of infant statistical learning.
S. Parvanezadeh Esfahani, J. Hay
3 year-old children respect the complex-NP constraint.
M. Hirzel, J. Lidz
3:00 – 4:15
ATTENDED POSTER SESSION I (Metcalf Small)
Session A
(East Balcony)
Session B
(Conference Auditorium)
Session C
(Terrace Lounge)
4:15
Child participation in a Toronto English vowel change.
E. Hall, R. Maddeaux
Speech rates differentiate nouns and verbs in child-surrounding and child-produced speech.
N. Lester, B. Bickel, S. Stoll
Investigating the Hypothesis Space of Children’s Interpretation of Comparatives.
M. Gotowski, K. Syrett
4:45
The representation of Mandarin tone sandhi by early-implanted children with cochlear implants.
P. Tang, N. Xu Rattanasone, I. Yuen, L. Gao, K. Demuth
Toddlers both hear and recognize polysemous word meanings: corpus and experimental evidence.
S. Floyd, L. Barak, A. Goldberg, C. Lew-Williams
Children’s Acquisition of Perspective-Taking Benefactive Verbs in Japanese.
A. Ohba, K. Deen
5:15
Syllable repetition is privileged over consonant repetition in infant word segmentation.
M. Ota, A. Holtz, B. Skarabela
What accounts for socioeconomic differences in child-directed speech? The role of resource scarcity.
M. Ellwood-Lowe, R. Foushee, M. Srinivasan
Are universal quantifier errors and errors with “only” related?.
J. Spenader, P. Hendriks, B. Hollebrandse, A. de Koster
5:45 – 7:45
DINNER BREAK
5:45 – 7:45
POP-UP MENTORING PROGRAM
KEYNOTE ADDRESS (Metcalf Large)
7:45 – 9:00
Bootstrapping verb argument-structure: Syntax, statistics, and discourse.
Cynthia Fisher (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)


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Saturday, November 9, 2019

9:00 – 5:00
BOOK EXHIBIT (Ziskind Lounge)
Session A
(East Balcony)
Session B
(Conference Auditorium)
Session C
(Terrace Lounge)
9:00
Long-Distance Wh-Questions in French Children: Revisiting Computational Complexity.
B. Hollebrandse, S. Durrlemann, L. Rizzi, A. van Hout
Predicting language proficiency of deaf children.
B. Amador, J. Morford, E. Wilkinson, A. Villwock
Markedness modulates prediction in person agreement for L1 but not L2 speakers: Evidence from event-related potentials (ERP).
J. Alemán Bañón, D. Miller, J. Rothman
9:30
Late Intervention Effects in Mandarin Sluice Acquisition.
M. Liu, N. Hyams, V. Mateu
Efficient from the Beginning: Argument Structural Relations in Nicaraguan Sign Language.
M. Flaherty, S. Goldin-Meadow
Word order and information structure in Russian as a heritage or second language.
T. Ionin, M. Goldshtein, T. Luchkina, S. Styrina
10:00
Examining island sensitivity in native and nonnative speakers: Evidence from acceptability judgments and event-related potentials.
L. Covey, R. Fiorentino, C. Pham, D. Wilson, A. Gabriele
Iconicity in ASL acquisition: Receptive and expressive vocabulary acquisition.
N. Caselli, J. Pyers
Previous language influence in additive adult multilingualism of early child bilinguals.
E. Puig Mayenco, J. González Alonso, A. Fábregas, J. Rothman
10:30 – 11:00
BREAK (Ziskind Lounge)
Session A
(East Balcony)
Session B
(Conference Auditorium)
Session C
(Terrace Lounge)
11:00
Anaphoric that: difference between adults and children.
D. Ahn, S. Arunachalam
Spoken Word Recognition in Early Childhood.
E. Schoen Simmons, R. Paul, J. Magnuson
The Ergative Subject Preference in the Acquisition of Wh-questions in Tongan.
K. Otaki, M. Sato, H. Ono, N. Yusa, K. Sugisaki, S. Kaitapu, '. Veikune, P. Vea, Y. Otsuka, M. Koizumi
11:30
Adults and children can predict in naturally variable referential contexts.
T. Reuter, C. Lew-Williams
Effects of Speaking Style and Context on Online Word Recognition in Young Children.
S. van der Feest, C. Blanco, R. Smiljanic
The Development of Wh-Question Representations in Infancy: Evidence from 15- and 18-Month-Olds.
J. Lidz, L. Perkins
SATURDAY SYMPOSIUM (Metcalf Large)
12:15 – 1:45
Leaving the lab: Developmental hypothesis-testing using natural corpora.
Elika Bergelson (Duke University), Daniel Swingley (University of Pennsylvania), Kim Oller (The University of Memphis)
Session A
(East Balcony)
Session B
(Conference Auditorium)
Session C
(Terrace Lounge)
2:15
Language shapes children’s understanding of number.
C. Yang, M. Lei, T. Lee
Not getting ahead of ourselves: A cross-linguistic investigation of children’s understanding of negation.
L. Pozzan, R. Feiman, J. Snedeker, M. Guasti, K. Dorn, S. Weinert, A. de Carvalho, J. Trueswell
Children know the default: evidence from verb order in ‘because’-clauses in spontaneous speech and elicited repetition.
P. Schulz, E. Sanfelici
2:45
Non-linguistic inhibition predicts lexical inhibition in 6-7 year-old children.
Z. Maher, J. Edwards
Aspect acquisition correlates less with tense than expected.
J. Mažara, S. Stoll
Children but not adults use both speech and gesture to produce informative expressions of Left-Right relations.
D. Karadöller, E. Ünal, B. Sumer, D. Özer, T. Göksun, A. Özyürek
3:15 – 4:30
ATTENDED POSTER SESSION II (Metcalf Small)
Session A
(East Balcony)
Session B
(Conference Auditorium)
Session C
(Terrace Lounge)
4:30
Children are sensitive to the internal temporal profiles of events.
Y. Ji, A. Papafragou
Wordful: Tracking Early Productive Vocabulary Growth with Smartphones.
S. Meylan, M. Braginsky, B. deMayo, A. Sanchez, C. Schonberg, M. Srinivasan, H. Vlach, G. Lupyan, T. Griffiths, M. Frank
No revision required, still difficult to interpret: Japanese children’s comprehension of verb-initial passives.
M. Ishikawa, T. Ito, T. Goro
5:00
Transitive clauses can describe 3-participant events: Evidence against one-to-one matching between arguments and participants in verb learning.
A. Williams, L. Perkins, J. Lidz
Contact without contact: English digital language input and its effects on L1 Icelandic.
S. Sigurjonsdottir, I. Nowenstein, T. Thorvaldsdottir, D. Gudmundsdottir
L2 acquisition of contrasts in interpretive ambiguity between VP-ellipsis and Gapping.
H. Hwang, B. Schwartz
PLENARY ADDRESS (Metcalf Large)
5:45 – 7:00
Dialect mismatch and learning to read: Research to practice.
Jan Edwards (University of Maryland)
7:00 – 8:30
RECEPTION (Ziskind Lounge)


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Sunday, November 10, 2019

Session A
(East Balcony)
Session B
(Conference Auditorium)
Session C
(Terrace Lounge)
9:00
A noisy channel model for systematizing unpredictable input variation.
J. Schneider, L. Perkins, N. Feldman
Not all wh-dependencies are created equal: processing of multiple wh-questions in Romanian children and adults.
A. Bentea, T. Marinis
Neural generation of scalar implicatures in preschool children and adults.
A. Kampa, B. Zinszer, A. Papafragou, K. Jasinska
9:30
A longitudinal investigation of language mixing in Spanish-English dual language learners: The role of language proficiency, variability, and socio-linguistic factors.
S. Montanari, W. Ochoa, K. Subrahmanyam
Evidence for the resilience of syntactic processing to L1 attrition.
T. Grüter, H. Hopp
WH-in situ in Brazilian Portuguese and the influence of Common Ground.
C. Vieira, E. Grolla
10:00
Who says it and what does it sound like? Quantifying within- and between- talker variability in infants’ naturalistic input.
F. Bulgarelli, E. Bergelson
Wh-question processing in bilingual children: Evidence from the visual-world paradigm.
G. Pontikas, I. Cunnings, T. Marinis
A usage-based analysis of the acquisition of information structure: a study on the acquisition of dislocation in French.
M. Jourdain, E. Canut, K. Lahousse
10:30 – 11:00
BREAK (Ziskind Lounge)
SUNDAY SYMPOSIUM (Metcalf Large)
11:00 – 12:30
Young children’s comprehension of negation and its challenges for language acquisition.
Alex de Carvalho (Université de Paris – Université Paris Descartes), Roman Feiman (Brown University), Ann Nordmeyer (Southern New Hampshire University)


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