• Taylor Mendoza

    Associate Editor, BU Today & Bostonia

    Taylor Mendoza is a BU Today and Bostonia associate editor. She graduated from BU in 2018 with a BA in English and a minor in cinema and media studies. At BU, she wrote for The Daily Free Press and was treasurer of the Creative Writing Club. She worked as a marketing content intern for JumpStart Games and as a social media and marketing associate at Nimble, Inc. She also makes videos about books on YouTube and was recently named a Penguin Teen Influencer. When she’s not reading, she can be found writing, listening to podcasts, watching movies, or playing board games. Profile

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There are 4 comments on Detangling the History of Black Hair

  1. So thrilled to see this amazing book! I remember Zenda as a passionate advocate for students of color and a respected member of the BU community during our years as BU undergrads. I have ordered this book and am already looking forward to seeing what’s next in the Know Your Hairitage series. Keep rising, Zenda!!

  2. I am a middle-aged white woman and I find this fascinating and beautiful. No one ever talks about different textures of hair and how women care for it. What a wonderful topic to bridge the culture gap and help others to learn and understand each other better. I’d love to give a boy version of this book to my nephew who is African-American.

  3. As a white woman(SAR 73), with biracial children, I faced challenges as my daughter grew up to work with her hair. I will admit she often ended up with some interesting hairdos. I would take her to friends and acquaintances homes if they offered to do her hair. When she became a teen, she started to do her own hair ( thank goodness) and we often laughed over my foibles. I will look for this book for my granddaughters, it’s beautiful.

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