• Kat J. McAlpine

    Editor, The Brink Twitter Profile

    Kat J McAlpine

    Kat J. McAlpine is editor of The Brink, Boston University’s news site for scientific breakthroughs and pioneering research. Kat has been telling science stories for over a decade, and prior to joining BU’s editorial staff, publicized research at Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, and the University of Connecticut’s School of Engineering. Profile

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There are 9 comments on Live Coronavirus Research Gets Underway at BU NEIDL

  1. This is an interesting story. It’s pretty pathetic though that the government in MA took months for the necessary permits to be in place before any research could begin. Even in a global pandemic government throws up bureaucratic barriers.

    1. Hi Johnathan. I don’t know enough about the procedures BU researchers had to follow in order to get government permission to do this vital research. But I would think the requirements put in place were designed by medical experts to protect public health. And for that, I am grateful.

  2. I believe it took almost 10 years after the facility was built before the final permit for Biosafety Level 4 research was issued, and research could start. There were many layers of permitting required (Federal, State, City) and since there was some community opposition to the facility, there were challenges and appeals that had to be resolved as well.

    I was fortunate enough to tour the facility after it was completed and before it was open and I was incredibly impressed with the humongous amount of safety protocols and protection systems that are in place.

    Since we have world class research scientists here in Boston, let’s hope that an effective treatment for Covid-19 can be found soon.

  3. I remember touring NEIDL about five years ago or so … during alumni weekend. It was fascinating! I am so proud that my alma mater is having such a positive impact in the field of medical research and public health.

  4. Good luck to Professor Davey and his team. (He looks like he’s having too much fun in that spacesuit!) If we’re going to get through this it will be by relying on people who understand science and data.

  5. The fascinating results on anti-Ebola drugs is powerful base for success of Professor Davey’ team. Unfortunately we haven’t so beautiful opportunities (funding, “full” BSL-3 etc.) in Ukraine for so complicate researches. But as alternative we try conduct the drug’s trials on bovine and porcine coronaviruses (as surrogate models). Because acute epidemic phase of COVID-19 obligatory will change by endemic phase with establishment of coronavirus association with concurrent agents with impact for coronavirus activity, we launch of screening of the appropriate bacterial biofilms as alternative to or as addition approach for chemotherapy. We want a comprehensive and fast success to Professor Davey and his team! We are very interested in Ukraine in their success!

  6. I am a computer scientist, not a microbiologist. Nevertheless, I’d like to bring to your attention a potential candidate drug for testing against COVID-19. A number of years ago an Alkaloid named Anatabine was identified to have potential anti-inflammatory properties. I’ve read that COVID-19 infection involves inflammation. So, even if there is a remote chance it helps I wanted to suggest testing Anatabine to reduce inflammation caused by this virus.

    Anatabine’s possible anti-inflammatory property was an accidental discovery. A product containing Anatabine was briefly available in the marketplace. It was purported to operate completely differently than NSAIDs. This potentially exciting discovery has been swept into obscurity by a series of management missteps. The product is no longer available even though many people gave it positive reviews.

    The formal name of Anatabine is 1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-2,3′-bipyridine.
    A research paper can be found here: http://cms.herbalgram.org/herbalgram/issue104/HG104-feat-AnatabineScience.html

    Best wishes and Godspeed to the research team!

  7. My daughter has Lupus and takes cellcept as recommended by her doctor in Pittsburgh.
    Could that be a medication that is also tested?

    Thank you and may God Bless You and your team.

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