• Megan Woolhouse

    Staff Writer

    Megan Woolhouse

    Megan Woolhouse worked as a reporter at the Boston Globe for more than a decade, in addition to newspapers in Louisville, Ky., and Baton Rouge, La. A graduate of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and Clark University in Worcester, she lives in Boston and enjoys baking, reading, and taekwondo sparring with her seven-year-old daughter. Profile

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There are 2 comments on When Did Tom Brady, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Kylie Jenner Become Our Doctors?

  1. I think it started when we become trusting Doctors more than Scientist. Doctors make way more money than scientists so they are more trustworthy. Tom Brady on the other hand….just extra step in the same direction.

  2. The cited celebrities are almost benign in comparison to some of the more powerfully placed ignorant people who are influencing public behavior, and one of the most dangerous of those is Darla Shine.
    (Darla Shine is the wife of Bill Shine, the current White House Deputy Chief of Staff for Communications, formerly co-president of Fox News — the epicenter of misinformation.)
    Darla Shine has been routinely promoting concepts which have no basis in fact, and via her pretense of authority, is encouraging people to adopt attitudes which can be lethal to children and others in the population. Here is Darla Shine’s tweet from just yesterday:

    “Here we go LOL #measlesoutbreak on #CNN #Fake #Hysteria
    The entire Baby Boom population alive today had the #Measles as kids
    Bring back our #ChildhoodDiseases they keep you healthy & fight cancer”

    The level of ignorance represented in this statement is astounding, and yet it is real. Here is a supposedly educated person promoting fiction as science. I would encourage anyone who believes that her statement has basis in fact to review the death rates in children before the measles vaccine, and to try to find any research which finds that childhood diseases fight cancer.
    A conspicuous further danger is that such thinking in proximity to a president who is already predisposed to false “facts” could lead to policies which put the population at further risk, with the potential of epidemic rise in preventable diseases. Just recall Donald Trump’s 2014 tweet:
    “Healthy young child goes to doctor, gets pumped with massive shot of many vaccines, doesn’t feel good and changes – AUTISM. Many such cases!”

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