Culture Pass Events

Check out our WLL Events Calendar for an interactive view of Culture Pass and other World Languages and Literatures events.

A Note on Etiquette in Lectures and other Culture Pass Events

These are events that will be attended by professors and others from around Boston, so it is important to make a good impression as a BU student.  Some guidelines to follow:

  1. Stay until the end of the talk or panel.
  2. Be respectful and quiet if you arrive late.
  3. Turn off your phone.
  4. Do not text during the lecture.
  5. If you ask a question, introduce yourself first.

Efraín Kristal is professor of Spanish, French and Comparative Literature at UCLA. He is a specialist of Latin American literature in comparative contexts and in translation studies. He has published over 90 scholarly articles and several single author and edited books including Invisible Work. Borges and Translation, a book on Jorge Luis Borges’ work as a translator and the significance on translation in his creative process, and Poems of the Night, a bilingual edited volume of Borges’ poetry published by Penguin Classics. His work on translation also includes the essay on philosophical and theoretical approaches to translation for the Blackwell Companion to Translation Studies; and essays on translation and the creative process in Yves Bonnefoy, Marcel Proust and Nicanor Parra. He has also written on the role of translation in Colonial Spanish American literature. He is currently writing a book on the German philosopher Peter Sloterdijk, and translating a book on aesthetics from the Italian by Remo Bodei.

 

Dr. Sassan Zand Moqaddam, Visiting Scholar, Boston University, Dept. of World Languages & Literatures

The Need for a New Critical Edition of the Ma‘ārif of Bahā’-i Walad

Friday, January 26, 2018 at 5:00pm

Room 133, Barker Center (Plimpton Room)

Abstract: Manuscript 2116 in the Mawlānā Museum in Konya is the only extant copy of the fourth chapter of the Ma‘ārif of Bahā’-i Walad (1148-1231 AD), the great Sufi master and father of the renowned Sufi poet Rūmī. This manuscript is of particular importance given that it is believed to have been written while Bahā’-i Walad was still alive, and there are notes and corrections in the text, penned in red, considered by some to be by Bahā’-i Walad himself, and by others to be by Rūmī. Although this work was edited in 1957 by the eminent Iranian scholar Badī‘uzzamān Furūzānfar, there are many mistakes in that published edition, adding ambiguity to an already very difficult text, making some passages totally incomprehensible, and concealing certain key issues. The reasons for the mistakes are manifold: the poor quality of white and black colors in the possession of Furūzānfar, intentional changes or omissions due to particular social scruples about sexually explicit material, mistakes in re-ordering wrongly ordered pages, etc. This has not only misled later scholars, but has also obscured some very interesting material that provides unexpected new insights into Bahā’-i Walad’s teachings and his sources and inspirations. Based on the significance of this work, I made a new edition of the text and published it. In this seminar, I indicate the different mistakes made in the previous edition and the importance of the new findings.

Sassan Zand Moqaddam obtained his Ph.D. in Persian Literature in 2013 under the supervision of Professors Jalil Moshayedi and William C. Chittick. He has done substantive research in textual criticism, mystical interpretation and comparative mystical literature, and has published several papers in prestigious journals in Iran. His published works include extensive research on the writings of Rūmī and his father Bahā’-i Walad, stylistic dating of several literary texts of dubious date, several articles on the symbolism used in the mystical and literary Persian texts, and comparative studies on the inroads of Buddhist and Hindu thoughts in Persian literature. His most important contribution to textual criticism is a new critical edition of Ma‘ārif of Bahā’-i Walad, a work of utmost importance in discovering the origins of Rūmī’s thought and a classic in its own right. Sassan currently holds a post-doctoral fellowship with the Iranian National Science Foundation and is a visiting scholar at Boston University, where he is completing a monograph (in Persian) entitled, Rumi’s Mathnawī: A Simple Progression or a Complicated Design?

http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/persian-and-persianate-studies

Caroline Alexander is the author of seven books of non-fiction including the international best-sellers The Endurance: Shackleton’s Legendary Antarctic Expedition and The Bounty: The True Story of the Mutiny on the Bounty. Her most recent book The War That Killed Achilles: The True Story of the Iliad and the Trojan War, led to the commission to make a new English translation of the Iliad, which was published to acclaim in 2015, by Ecco Press/HarperCollins. Alexander has also written for The New YorkerSmithsonian, and National Geographic Magazine, where she was a contributing writer for many years. Her most recent magazine publications include a National Geographic Magazine cover story on blast-induced TBI in the military. A Rhodes Scholar and Mellon Fellow in the Humanities, Alexander received her doctorate in Classics from Columbia University in 1991. Between 1982-85, Alexander established a department of Classics at the University of Malawi, in Central-East Africa.

 

2/7 – The Funeral  お葬式 (1984)  124 min.    

When the wife’s ornery father dies suddenly due to a heart attack, having a three-day funeral at home becomes too much to handle. Her family and especially her husband Wabisuke find themselves in hilarious situations as the younger generation struggles with the complex rituals of the Buddhist ceremony that are fading fast from modern Japanese life.                      Director: ITAMI, Juzo (Tampopo, Taxing Woman)

Screenings Every Other Wednesday at 6:30pm

(All films with English subtitles)

CAS 533B (Capacity strictly 35 maximum), 685 Commonwealth Avenue

BU COMMUNITY ONLY

Presented by the Department of World Languages and Literatures, Boston University Center for the Study of Asia and the Geddes Language Center. For further information, please contact hmiyagi@bu.edu (Hiromi Miyagi-Lusthaus).

Jahan Ramazani is University Professor and Edgar F. Shannon Professor of English at the University of Virginia. He is writing a book on poetry in a global age. His five previous books are Poetry and Its Others: News, Prayer, Song, and the Dialogue of Genres (2013); A Transnational Poetics (2009), winner of the 2011 Harry Levin Prize of the American Comparative Literature Association, awarded for the best book in comparative literary history from 2008 to 2010; The Hybrid Muse: Postcolonial Poetry in English (2001); Poetry of Mourning: The Modern Elegy from Hardy to Heaney (1994), a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award; and Yeats and the Poetry of Death: Elegy, Self-Elegy, and the Sublime (1990). He is editor of The Cambridge Companion to Postcolonial Poetry (2017); a co-editor of The Norton Anthology of Modern and Contemporary Poetry (2003) and The Norton Anthology of English Literature (2006, 2012, 2018); and an associate editor of The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (2012). He is a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, an NEH Fellowship, a Rhodes Scholarship, the William Riley Parker Prize of the MLA, and the Thomas Jefferson Award, the University of Virginia’s highest honor. In 2016, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

 

Learn about the art of Jewish papercuts at BU Hillel on February 11 with artist Mindy Shapiro. The event, supported by the Jewish Cultural Endowment, is free and open to all BU students! Please reserve your spot by contacting Sarah Young at sarahy@bu.edu.

 

In Search of Israeli Cuisin is a portrait of the Israeli people told through food. The feature length document puts a face on the culture of Israel, profiling chefs, home cooks, vinters, and cheese-makers drawn from the more than one hundred cultures that make up Israel today – Jewish, Arab, Muslim, Christian.

Film screening followed by conversation with Mira Angrist, Lecturer of Hebrew at BU

 

Japanese-English Language Exchange Lunch

2/15 (F), 2/23 (F), 3 /2 (F) : 50 students will be coming from Ritsumeikan University and Hitotsubashi University for 3 weeks.  Meet them and be friends!
Time: 12:30-2:30 PM
Location: GSU Food Court, 775 Comm Ave in the BACK COURT ROOM

 

 

BUNITED Student Diversity Conference is a Boston-wide collegiate event. We welcome all students from all universities!

The day will consist of various workshops that will cover topics stemming from oppressive systems such as mass incarceration, anti-blackness within non-black communities, misogyny, mental health, self-care and imperialism.

Through our theme “Get to the Root: Unearthing Oppression and Cultivating Change” we set out to provide networks for accountability and dialogue that promote real life problem solving in conjunction with local action. At this year’s conference we wish to focus on each individual’s capacity to make a change in society today. As we come together as one we strive to provide a platform for productive conversation and bring new perspectives to light. Most importantly, we anticipate that each attendee leaves our conference recognizing the power that they possess within themselves.

At BUNITED we hope to bring individuals together for collective learning about various cultures and realities. The conference will consist of Breakfast and Lunch, 3 workshops,  a cultural show, Feminista Jones as the keynote speaker, and a breakout session.

NO REFUNDS.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bunited-student-diversity-conference-2018-tickets-41437997165?aff=es2

The BU Center for the Study of Asia and the BU Arts Initiative are please to welcome documentary filmmaker Xu Xing to BU for a three month residency. Please join us for the following public programs:

Open Studio
Chat with Xu Xing about filmmaking, camera work, storytelling, & more
Tuesday, February 20 at 4:30-6 p.m.
BU Arts Initiative (GSU, 2nd Floor)
Free & Open to BU Students – no RSVP required.

Click here to read more about Xu Xing at BU.

Follow the Facebook event updates here

2/21 – Tokyo Sonata  トウキョウソナタ (2008) 120 min.

A father who suddenly loses his job is too ashamed to tell his family. The eldest son in college hardly returns home; the youngest son furtively takes piano lessons in secret; and the mother, who knows deep down that she must keep the family together, cannot find the will to do so. From the outside, all seems normal and unchanged, but a growing chasm threatens to destroy the family.

Director: KUROSAWA, Kiyoshi (Cure, Pulse)

Spring 2018 GEDDES JAPANESE MOVIE SERIES

Screenings Every Other Wednesday at 6:30pm

(All films with English subtitles)

CAS 533B (Capacity strictly 35 maximum), 685 Commonwealth Avenue

BU COMMUNITY ONLY

Presented by the Department of World Languages and Literatures, Boston University Center for the Study of Asia and the Geddes Language Center. For further information, please contact hmiyagi@bu.edu (Hiromi Miyagi-Lusthaus).

You are invited to join the College of Fine Arts School of Theatre as we celebrate our first production in the new Joan & Edgar Booth Theatre: Ionesco’s absurdist allegory, Rhinoceros!


RHINOCEROS
by Eugene Ionesco
translated by Martin Crimp
directed by Clay Hopper

February 21-25
Wednesday, Feb 21, 7:30pm
Thursday, Feb 22, 7:30pm
Friday, Feb 23, 8pm (talk-back)
Saturday, Feb 24, 8pm (talk-back)
Sunday, Feb 25, 2pm

The sublime is confused with the ridiculous in this savage commentary on the human condition, a staple of every theatre classroom and of 20th century drama. A small town is besieged by one roaring citizen who becomes a rhinoceros and proceeds to trample on the social order. As more citizens are transformed into rhinoceroses, the trampling becomes overwhelming. One sane man, Berenger, remains, unable to change his form and identity.


Joan & Edgar Booth Theatre

820 Commonwealth Avenue
T: Green “B” Line to BU West
BU Bus: M2 Stop

TICKETS: School of Theatre productionsincluding Rhinoceros, The Journey, and Antigone in Booth Theatreare FREE to members of the BU Community (faculty, staff, and students) with BU ID, at the door, day of performance, subject to availability, one ticket per ID. Additional or Advance Tickets: $15 each

Speakers:
Roberta Micallef (BU WLL)
Yoon Sun Yang (BU WLL)
Sarah Frederick (BU WLL)
Shilpa Parnami (BU WLL)
Petrus Liu (BU WLL)

Time: Wednesday, February 21, 2018, 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Location: Geddes Language Center | 685 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 533B

Dinner served

2018 BU ASIAN FILM WEEK

Thursday 2/22
3:30-6pm | TURKISH film: “A Touch of Spice” (2003) Dir. Tassos Boulmetis
Location: Geddes Language Center | 685 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 533B

 

 

Friday 2/23 
2:30-5pm | KOREAN film: “The face reader” (Kwansang, 2013) Dir. Han Jae Rim
Location: Geddes Language Center | 685 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 533B

2018 BU ASIAN FILM WEEK

Japanese-English Language Exchange Lunch

2/15 (F), 2/23 (F), 3 /2 (F) : 50 students will be coming from Ritsumeikan University and Hitotsubashi University for 3 weeks.  Meet them and be friends!
Time: 12:30-2:30 PM
Location: GSU Food Court, 775 Comm Ave in the BACK COURT ROOM

 

HARAM is an essay film portraying the urgent contemporary situation at the Haram Al Sharif/Noble Sanctuary in the Old City of Jerusalem reflecting on the growing Temple Mount Faithful movement whose goal is to build the Jewish Third Temple on this holy landscape and in turn to  assert Jewish sovereignty over this holy Muslim site.

Film screening and conversation with filmmaker Cynthia Madansky

 

 

Monday 2/26 
3:30-5:30pm | JAPANESE film: “Princess Mononoke” (1997) Dir. Hayao Miyazaki
Location: Geddes Language Center | 685 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 533B

2018 BU ASIAN FILM WEEK

Tuesday 2/27 
3:30-6pm | PAKISTANI film: “Silent Waters” (Punjabi and Urdu, 2003) Dir. Sabiha Sumar
Location: Geddes Language Center | 685 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 537A

2018 BU ASIAN FILM WEEK

The Drama of Celebrity

Please join us on February 28, 2018, for a lecture by Prof. Sharon Marcus (Columbia University): “The Drama of Celebrity.

The talk will be held at 6pm at Boston University Hillel, 213 Bay State Road (the Bay State Room, on the 4th floor).  All are welcome.

Sharon Marcus is Orlando Harriman Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and currently a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute. The event is sponsored by Boston University’s Department of English, the Center for the Study of Europe, the American & New England Studies Program, the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program, and the Department of World Languages and Literatures.

See event link here

Wednesday 2/28 
3:30-6pm | CHINESE film: Swordsmen II: Asia the Invincible (1992). Dir. Ching Siu-tung
Location: Geddes Language Center | 685 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 533B

2018 BU ASIAN FILM WEEK

 

 

Japanese-English Language Exchange Lunch

2/15 (F), 2/23 (F), 3 /2 (F) : 50 students will be coming from Ritsumeikan University and Hitotsubashi University for 3 weeks.  Meet them and be friends!
Time: 12:30-2:30 PM
Location: GSU Food Court, 775 Comm Ave in the BACK COURT ROOM

 

 

3/14 – Ballad of Narayama   楢山節考 (1983)  130 min.

In a small rural village in Japan in the 19th century, once a person reaches the age of 70 s/he must travel to a remote mountain to die of starvation, a practice known as ubasute. The story concerns Orin, who is 69 and in sound health, seeing a neighbor drag his own unwilling father away, resolves to avoid clinging to life beyond her term. She spends a year arranging all the affairs of her family before leaving. This movie won the highest prize at the 1983 Cannes Film Festival.                                             Director: IMAMURA, Shohei (The Eel)

Spring 2018 GEDDES JAPANESE MOVIE SERIES

Screenings Every Other Wednesday at 6:30pm

(All films with English subtitles)

CAS 533B (Capacity strictly 35 maximum), 685 Commonwealth Avenue

BU COMMUNITY ONLY

Presented by the Department of World Languages and Literatures, Boston University Center for the Study of Asia and the Geddes Language Center. For further information, please contact hmiyagi@bu.edu (Hiromi Miyagi-Lusthaus).

For more information about this event, please click here.

 

Kerim Yasar (Ph.D., Columbia) is Assistant Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Southern California. He specializes in modern Japanese literature and cinema, media history, and translation studies. He is also active as a translator in a variety of genres and media—from contemporary novels to pre-modern poetry to the subtitles for more than a hundred feature films in the Criterion Collection/Janus Films library, including classic works by directors such as Kurosawa Akira, Ozu Yasujiro, and Oshima Nagisa—and worked as an editor of translations from the Japanese for two years at Vertical, Inc. in New York City. His first book, Electrified Voices: Auditory Technology and Culture in Japan, 1868-1945, is forthcoming from Columbia University Press later this year.

 

The Boston University Confucian Associate and Confucian Institution of UMass Boston invited Prof. Anna Sun of Kenyan College to talk this topic of “Towards a Global Confucianism in the 21st Century: Field notes from China, South Korean, and Indonesia”. Prof. Robert C.Neville of Boston University, Dr. Yoir Lior, and Dr, Bin Song will be the panel respondents.

 

Please RSVP by March 18th using this eventbrite link. Password: film

5:30pm Reception
6:30pm Movie Screening

Hosted by The Consulate General of Japan in Boston, Boston University and AJC New England.

Please join us for a lunch talk by Dr. Sayed Hassan Hussaini Akhlaq, WLL Research Fellow, and Dr. Sassan Zand Moqaddam WLL Visiting Fellow, on Renewal and Transformation: A Sufi Dialogue on March 22nd, 12:30-2:00 pm at the Pardee School of Global Studies (121 Bay State Road) Riverside room. The talks will be followed by what is sure to be a vigorous discussion led by Professor Sunil Sharma.

 

 


Come and enjoy BU KSA’s culture show on Saturday, March 24th FOR FREE!

Join us as we experience Korean culture through the eyes of a tourist’s journey to the Winter Olympics in PyeongChang. Get ready for a night to remember filled with amazing performances that range from traditional dances, pop dances, singing performances, and also a fashion show.

Along with that, taste some of Korea’s most popular dishes from Coreanos. There will also be a chance for you to win gift certificates to Coreanos and Bukyung! Don’t miss out on our biggest event of the year!

You must RSVP through Eventbrite in order to get a physical ticket on the day of the show at Tsai Performance Center. This ticket will give you free admission to the show, allow you to get FREE food from Coreanos, and be entered in the raffle to win the gift certificates. Food will also be served at the lobby in front of Tsai right after the show ends.

ALSO, first 40 people to get to the show and get the physical ticket will get free bubble tea!

Doors will open at 6:30PM!

**Eventbrite ticket link will be released this week**

Performances include Talchum (Korean mask dance), Nanta (Drumming of Korean traditional folk and modern music), Traditional Fan Dance, Modern Fan Dance, and Modern Singing (Korean pop songs). All the performers are a part of the Korean Student Association at BU.

Follow the Facebook event for more information.

Chat with Xu Xing about film-making camera work, story-telling and more.

XU Xing: In Residence at BU

Zadie Smith, essayist and renowned author of White Teeth, On Beauty, and Swing Time, will engage in a conversation led by Christopher Lydon, host of WBUR’s Open Source, followed by questions from the audience. The event is sponsored by the Boston University Provost’s Office, the Dean of Students’ Office, the Elie Wiesel Center for Jewish Studies, the Dean of the College of Arts & Sciences, Kilachand Honors College, the NEH Distinguished Teaching Professorship, the CAS Core Curriculum, and the BU Alumni Association. The event is free and open to the public, but a reservation will ensure a ticket. Registration opens March 1st at http:www.zadie.eventbrite.com
Speaker(s): Zadie Smith & Christopher Lydon
When
Monday, Mar 26, 2018 at 7:00pm
Where
Tsai Performance Center, 685 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215
Who
Open to General Public
Admission is free

“Smith, a New York University professor of creative writing, will be on campus on Monday, March 26, to speak with Christopher Lydon, host of WBUR’s Open Source, at the Tsai Performance Center. The conversation, titled On Writing, is sponsored by several BU schools and offices, and inaugurates a new speaker series, Conversations in the Arts and Ideas, highlighting the humanities at the University.

While tickets to the conversation are no longer available, Smith will meet with students for an informal Q&A over breakfast at 9 am on Tuesday, March 27, at the Photonics Center.”

Students interested in attending the Q&A can register on Eventbrite here.

Visit BU Today for more information about Zadie Smith and her visit to Boston University.

Wednesday, March 28th
3:00-4:00pm
STH 611

Join us for Middle Eastern Tea Hour on March 28th! Come meet
classmates and students studying other languages as well as BU
WLL Faculty.

 

3/28 –The Happiness of the Katakurisカタクリ家の幸福(2001) 113 min.

The Katakuri family has just opened their guest house in the mountains. Unfortunately, their first guest commits suicide, and in order to avoid trouble they decide to bury him in the backyard. Things get much more complicated when their second guest, a famous sumo wrestler, dies while having sex with his underage girlfriend and the grave behind the house starts to fill up more and more.

Director: MIIKE, Takeshi (Audition, One Missed call, 13 Assassins)

Spring 2018 GEDDES JAPANESE MOVIE SERIES

Screenings Every Other Wednesday at 6:30pm

(All films with English subtitles)

CAS 533B (Capacity strictly 35 maximum), 685 Commonwealth Avenue

BU COMMUNITY ONLY

Presented by the Department of World Languages and Literatures, Boston University Center for the Study of Asia and the Geddes Language Center. For further information, please contact hmiyagi@bu.edu (Hiromi Miyagi-Lusthaus).

Please join us for: The 8th Annual Sedgwick Lecture, “How Social Movements Feel”. A talk with Dean Spade (Seattle University Law School).

As organizers know, social movements are made of relationships. While efforts to dismantle, reform, and reimagine are often focused on critical analysis and material outcomes, much of what determines the impacts of social movements are the social relations, conflicts, and emotional capacities of participants. In conversation with the work of Eve Sedgwick, Dean Spade will explore questions facing contemporary movements about our being together.

Click here for more information

 

Tackling the question of what happened in the countryside. Xu interviews a group of peasants convicted as counter-revolutionaries during the Cultural Revolution.

XU Xing: In Residence at BU

This event aims to introduce you to Morocco and the Moroccan culture. There will be Moroccan food and dessert, artifacts, clothes to try on and take pictures and gifts to win.  This is a great event for all students, especially those that are going to Morocco with Study Abroad. There will be music played in the background, listen and enjoy the Moroccan experience.

Please confirm your presence via email by contact aitmbark@bu.edu no later than Wednesday, 3/28 at 5:00pm. This is event is open to all BU students, please include the number of guests you plan to bring.

 

 

 

View and Discuss Xu Xing’s film A Chronicle of My Cultural Revolution (2009).

XU Xing: In Residence at BU

Join the Center for the Study of Europe and Professor Gregory Williams for a guided tour of the Institute of Contemporary Art’s highlights.

Institute of Contemporary Art, 25 Harbor Shore Drive.

Please RSVP online for contact Victoria at vi28@bu.edu

 

Michael R. Katz is the C.V. Starr Professor Emeritus of Russian and East European Studies at Middlebury College. He received his B.A. from Williams College and his D. Phil. From Oxford University. He has taught at Williams College, the University of Texas at Austin, and Middlebury College. He is the author of two books, The Literary Ballad in Early Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature (Oxford University Press, 1976) and Dreams and the Unconscious in Nineteenth-Century Russian Fiction (University Press of New England, 1984). He has translated more than fifteen Russian novels into English, including works by Herzen, Chernyshevsky, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. His two most recent translations are The Kreutzer Sonata Variations: Lev Tolstoy’s Novella and Counterstories by Sofiya Tolstaya and Lev Lvovich (Yale University Press, 2014) and Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment (Norton, 2017).

 

Please join us for the one-day symposium, “The Worlds of the Brothers Karamazov,” on April 7, 2018 (Castle Room/Bay State Room at BU Hillel, 213 Bay State Road).

Click here for more information

 

Moon of Israel is a 1923 Austrian silent epic directed by Mihaly Kertész, inspired by the story of Exodus. It tells the story of forbidden romance between a Jewish woman and an Egyptian price as Moses fights to free the Israelites from slavery.

Silent movie screening accompanied by composer Gerhard Gruber (Vienna)

 

 

 

 

Dr. Richard Williams, SOAS, University of London

April 11, 2018

4-6 pm, STH 636

4/11 – Departures   おくりびと   (2008)        130 min.

Daigo, a newly unemployed cellist, decided to go back to his childhood home with his young wife to start a new life. He applies for a job that sounds like a travel agency (‘departures’) and is hired, but it turns out to mean ‘encoffinment,’ or the undertaker business. Daigo begins the job with great reluctance, but gradually begins to learn lessons of life through it. This movie won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film in 2009.                                                                                       Director: TAKITA, Yojiro (Onmyoji)

Spring 2018 GEDDES JAPANESE MOVIE SERIES

Screenings Every Other Wednesday at 6:30pm

(All films with English subtitles)

CAS 533B (Capacity strictly 35 maximum), 685 Commonwealth Avenue

BU COMMUNITY ONLY

Presented by the Department of World Languages and Literatures, Boston University Center for the Study of Asia and the Geddes Language Center. For further information, please contact hmiyagi@bu.edu (Hiromi Miyagi-Lusthaus).

Hosted by REACT to FILM Boston University, join us for a screening of the documentary Save My Seoul, which follows two Korean-American brothers as they discover rampant prostitution and sex trafficking in Seoul, South Korea. With the use of hidden cameras and access to pimps, johns, and sex-workers, Eddie and Jason explore and unravel the complexity of the sex trade in Seoul. They learn that this problem is rooted in issues far deeper than lost girls and lustful men. Instead, it’s a consequence of the broken Korean culture that turns a blind eye to and condones one of the biggest human injustices of our generation. You can watch the trailer here.

REACT to FILM Boston University is a student organization dedicated to bringing powerful and relevant documentaries about political and social issues to campus in order to inspire out community to discuss and take action.

Please register for the event here: bit.ly/memory-4-12-18

 

Anthony Hood Chambers is a translator of Japanese literature, most notably of fiction by Tanizaki Jun’ichirō, including Naomi and Captain Shigemoto’s Mother; and Ueda Akinari’s Tales of Moonlight and Rain, for which he received the 2007 Japan-United States Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature. He has also published translations of Hara Tamiki, Hirano Keiichirō, Kamo no Chōmei, Kanze Kojirō, Kineya Shōjirō, Minakami (Mizukami) Tsutomu, Mishima Yukio, Miyamoto Teru, Natsume Sōseki, Shibusawa Tatsuhiko, Tate Shirō, and Zeami. He is the author of The Secret Window: Ideal Worlds in Tanizaki’s Fiction (1995) and Remembering Tanizaki Jun’ichirō and Matsuko (2017). A Professor Emeritus at Arizona State University, he has also taught at Wesleyan University, the Associated Kyoto Program, and the Kyoto Japan Center.

 

Starts: 5:00 pm on Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Ends: 6:30 pm on Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Location: Pardee School of Global Studies, 121 Bay State Road (1st floor)

URL: http://www.bu.edu/european/files/2018/03/04.17.18.pdf

While studying medicine and cultural anthropology, Patrick Autréaux published poetry and reviews of contemporary art. After practicing several years as an emergency-room psychiatrist, he decided to devote himself entirely to writing. The view of illness as an inner experience informs his first cycle of writing. He also published in 2015 Les Irréguliers (Gallimard), a novel on illegal immigrant in France. His “standing poem” Le Grand Vivant (Verdier) was produced at the Festival d’Avignon in 2015. In 2017, he published La Voix écrite (Verdier) a narrative of a life between literature and medicine.

Moderated by Odile Cazenave, Professor of French.

Please join us for a conversation about Discipline, Entertainment and Strong Emotions: Urdu Literature for Children, 1870-1970 with Professor Margrit Pernau from the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin. The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served

› Upcoming Events Calendar

The Chosen is a 1981 drama film directed by Jeremy Kagan, based on the 1967 bestselling book  by Chaim Potok. The film follows two boys in 1940s Brooklyn  who become friends despite their differing backgrounds, one the son of a Modern Orthodox professor and the other the son of a Hassidic Rabbi.

Screening and discussion with Professor Susan Bernstein (English Department)

EWCJS_FILM Spring 2018

Starts: 6:00 pm on Thursday, April 19, 2018

Ends: 8:00 pm on Thursday, April 19, 2018

Location: Pardee School of Global Studies, 121 Bay State Road (1st floor)

URL: http://www.bu.edu/european/files/2018/03/04.19.18.pdf

Ani Gjika is an Albanian-born poet, literary translator, teacher, and author of Bread on Running Waters (Fenway Press, 2013). Her honors include awards and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, English PEN, the Robert Pinsky Global Fellowship, and the Robert Fitzgerald Translation Prize. Gjika will read from her own work as well as from her recent translation from the Albanian of Negative Space by Luljeta Lleshanaku (New Directions, 2018).

Gazmend Kapllani is an Albanian-born journalist, poet, and writer. His works of fiction explore how totalitarianism, immigration, borders, and Balkan history have shaped private lives and personal narratives. He received his PhD in political science and history from Panteion University in Athens (where he lived for over twenty years). Kapllani currently lives in Boston and teaches Creative Writing and European History at Emerson College. In 2012, he was a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. He will read from the English translation of his first novel, A Short Border Handbook (New Europe Books, 2017).

Co-sponsored by the BU Pardee School Initiative on Forced Migration and Human Trafficking and the literary journal AGNI. A book-signing will follow the event.

Dr. Lindsey D. Snyder is a ASL interpreter, Shakespeare/Performance studies scholar, and theatre practitioner. She completed her PhD in theatre and performance studies at the University of Maryland, College Park with her dissertation “Sawing the Air Thus: American Sign Language Translations of Shakespeare and the Echoes of Rhetorical Gesture,” which is currently being updated for publication in 2018. This year Lindsey was awarded a short term fellowship with the Folger Shakespeare Library to continue her research on gesture and sign languages  In 2016-2017 she was awarded a Doris Duke Building Demand for the Arts grant in partnership with the American Shakespeare Center working as an Artist in Residence. Lindsey has interpreted countless performances ranging from classical texts to musicals to performance art.  She also works with interpreters as an educator and mentor. Currently, Lindsey is the Director of Education for Faction of Fools Theatre Company, a staff interpreter for the Federal government, and an Adjunct Professor for various universities in the Washington DC area. 

 

Directed by  Lynne Littman, In Her Own Time profiles the life and work of Professor Barbara Myerhoff, who began an anthropological study of the Orthodox Jews of the Fairfax district in Los Angeles. In June of 1983, Dr. Myerhoff learned that she had cancer. Throughout the research and filming of In Her Own Time, Dr. Myerhoff explored her own evolving relationship to Orthodox Judaism, revealing the continuing importance of religious traditions for individuals and families today.

Film screening and Q+A with producer Jonathan Bernstein

EWCJS_FILM Spring 2018

Starts: 6:00 pm on Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Ends: 8:00 pm on Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Location: Boston University Photonics Center, 8 St. Mary’s Street, 9th Floor, Colloquium Room

URL: http://www.bu.edu/european/files/2018/03/04.24.18.pdf

Faruk Šehić was born in 1970 in Bihać, in the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. Literary critics have hailed him as the leader of the ‘mangled generation’ of writers born in 1970s Yugoslavia, and his books have achieved cult status with readers across the whole region. His debut novel ‘Quiet Flows the Una’ (Knjiga o Uni, 2011) received the Meša Selimović prize for the best novel published in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro and Croatia in 2011 and the EU Prize for Literature in 2013.

Mirza Purić is a literary translator working from German and Bosnian-Croatian-Montenegrin-Serbian. He is a contributing editor of EuropeNow and in-house translator for the Sarajevo Writers’ Workshop. From 2014 to 2017 he was an editor-at-large for Asymptote. Next year Archipelago Books will release his co-translation, with Ellen Elias-Bursac, of Miljenko Jergovic’s story collection Inshallah, Madonna, Inshallah.

The conversation will be moderated by BU alumna Stacy Mattingly (MFA, 2011), who has already launched a collective of writers from this region who are engaged with the questions our project is considering as part of a collaboration, The Borders Project, serialized in the journal EuropeNow.

With funding from the BU Arts Initiative and the Creative Writing Program. Co-sponsored by the BU Pardee School Initiative on Forced Migration and Human Trafficking and the literary journal AGNI. A book-signing will follow the event.

4/25 – Like Father, Like Son そして父になる (2013)  121 min.

Ryota Nonomiya is a successful workaholic, but somewhat neglectful of his wife and son. When he and his wife learn that their biological son was switched with another child after birth, they must make a life-changing decision whether to choose their biological son or the boy they raised as their own while collaborating with the other couple whose lifestyle is very different.

Director: KORE-EDA, Hirokazu (Nobody Knows, I wish)

Spring 2018 GEDDES JAPANESE MOVIE SERIES

Screenings Every Other Wednesday at 6:30pm

(All films with English subtitles)

CAS 533B (Capacity strictly 35 maximum), 685 Commonwealth Avenue

BU COMMUNITY ONLY

Presented by the Department of World Languages and Literatures, Boston University Center for the Study of Asia and the Geddes Language Center. For further information, please contact hmiyagi@bu.edu (Hiromi Miyagi-Lusthaus).

Bridging Communities