Conference Schedule and Papers

The views expressed and materials presented in the articles linked to from this page are those of the authors of those articles and do not necessarily reflect the views of and should not be attributed to the Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies Program, Boston University or any of its faculty, staff, or trustees. The University makes no representations as to the accuracy, completeness, timeliness, suitability, originality or validity of any information presented in the articles and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries or damages arising from its display or use.

To see the papers that were presented during each conference session, click on the blue numbered session link.

SKIP TO: Thursday | Friday | Saturday

Thursday, March 27

    2:00 Tour and Reception at Radcliffe’s Schlesinger Library
    3 James Street, Cambridge, MA
    4:00 Boston University Conference Registration Began
    Stone Lobby, George Sherman Union (GSU)
    775 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA
    5:00 Reception
    GSU Metcalf Ballroom
    7:30 An evening of films of and about the era
    GSU Metcalf Ballroom
    Jennifer Lee, “Feminist: Stories from Women’s Liberation.”
    Mary Dore, “She’s Beautiful When She’s Angry.” (excerpts)
    Joan Braderman, “Heretics.” (shorter version)
    7:30“For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When The Rainbow Is Enuf”
    TheatreLab@855, College of Fine Arts
    855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA

Friday, March 28

    8:00 Registration and Coffee
    10:30 Coffee Break
    11:00 Session 2

Click Here To See Session 2 Panels
Historians discuss our historical narratives about the women’s liberation movement
GSU Conference Auditorium
Nancy Cott (chair), Rosalyn Baxandall, Dionne Espinoza, Sara Evans, Astrid Henry, Ruth Rosen, Robyn Spencer

How to Defang a Movement: Replacing the Political with the Personal
GSU Metcalf Ballroom
Kathie Sarachild (moderator), Ti-Grace Atkinson, Kathy Scarbrough, Carol Hanisch

 

    12:30 Lunch
    1:30 ‘Still Ain’t Satisfied!’ – Liberation Songs of Women’s Music
    Conference Auditorium, George Sherman Union
    with Marcia Deihl and Deborah Silverstein
    2:00 Session 3

Click Here To See Session 3 Panels
From the Lowell “Mill Girls” to Lean In: The Long Dance of Feminism and Capitalism
GSU Conference Auditorium
Susan Faludi

  • Introduced by Marilyn Halter

“Free to Be a Child”: Non-sexist Child rearing, Popular Culture, & the Women’s Liberation Movement
GSU East Balcony
Lori Rotskoff, Laura Lovett, Carole Hart

Tools of the Movement: Democracy, Community, and Consciousness Raising
Photonics 906
Leslie Brody (chair), Jane Mansbridge, Pernille Ipsen, Janet Freedman, Judith Parker & Deborah Mahlstedt

  • The Cambridge Women’s Center: Reflections on the Women’s Movement as a Core Stronghold for Participatory Democracy
  • “The power of community was liberating”: Experiences of Liberation at the first Femo-Camp in Denmark in 1971
  • A New Era of Consciousness-Raising
  • Process is Political: Current Conceptions of Feminist Process in Women’s Studies and Gender Studies Programs

Religion, Spirituality, and Women’s Liberation
School of Theology (STH) B19
Dean Mary Elizabeth Moore (chair), Mary Anne Case, Robyn Stein DeLuca, Xochitl Alvizo, Elizabeth Chloe Erdmann

  • The Women’s Liberation Movement through Vatican Eyes
  • The enduring legacy of second wave Jewish feminist theology
  • Radical Feminist Theologies and the Emerging Church
  • Raise it up: A goddess pilgrimage as a sustainable method for keeping feminist sparks flying without burning out

The Unfinished Business of Sex Equality: New Scholarship in the Legal History of Women’s Workplace Rights
College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) B12
Katherine Turk, Deborah Dinner, Mary Ziegler, Serena Mayeri (commentator)

Revisiting 70’s Feminist Theory
CAS 222
Lisa Disch, Judith Grant, Lori Marso, Kathi Weeks

  • Christine Delphy’s Deconstructivist Maternalism: An Overlooked “French Feminism”
  • Levi-Strauss and Structuralism in Second Wave Feminist Theory: Simone de Beauvoir, Gayle Rubin, and Juliet Mitchell
  • Rereading the Second Sex: Simone de Beauvoir and Feminism Today
  • The Vanishing Dialectic: Shulamith Firestone and the Future of the Feminist 1970s

Women’s Activism in Chicago: How the ideas of the women’s movement framed struggles in hospitals, the workplace and schools
CAS 315
Mardge Cohen, Diane Horwitz, Christine George

Women’s Liberation’s Revolutionary Potential
CAS 326
Diane Balser (chair), Judy Gumbo Albert, Roberta Salper, Sue Katz

 

    3:20 Coffee Break
    3:40 Session 4

Click Here To See Session 4 Panels
Women’s Liberation in Action: Theory, Practice and Organization
GSU Conference Auditorium
Heather Tobis Booth, Demita Frazier, Amy Kesselman, Chris Riddiough, Vivian Rothstein, Naomi Weisstein (in absentia)

Childhood and Adolescence
GSU East Balcony
Lori Rotskoff (chair), Clare Ploucha, Kera Lovell, Lauren Savit, Isobelle Barrett Meyering

  • Women’s History for Children
  • Girls are Equal Too: High School Activism and the Second Wave Women’s Movement
  • Sisters by Heart: How the Seeds of Women’s Liberation Blossomed at All-Girls’ Overnight Camps
  • “Down with childhood”: Shulamith Firestone and the Feminist Project of Women’s and Children’s Liberation—A View from Australia

Love, Sex, Marriage, and Motherhood
Photonics 906
Marilyn Safir (chair), Jodie N. Mader, Robin K. Payne, Rebecca Chalker, Sarah Crook

  • “Is this all?”: The Rebellion and Madness of a 1960s Housewife
  • Is there love after liberation?: The Problem of Romantic Love and the World of Ms. In the 1970s
  • The Pleasure Revolution: Feminists Critique Freud, Write Sex Advice Books and Subversive Novels, Found Their Own Magazine, Popularize Masturbation, Demand Respect for Lesbians, Open Their Own Sex Shops, Do Their Own Sex Surveys, Rehabilitate the Clitoris, Insert “Sex” Into Therapy, Explore BDSM, Make “Cunt” Art, Create Their Own Porn, and, in the Process, Reinvent Sex for Women and Their Partners
  • Of Anger and Tenderness: Understandings of how the Women’s Liberation Movement Challenged Psychiatry and Changed Motherhood in Britain

Feminist Filmmaking
STH B20
Maria San Filippo (chair), Linda Dittmar, Kristen Fallica, Maya Montañez Smukler

  • Silver, Pink and Purple Screen: Renegade Cinema and Feminist Academia
  • Cinematic Consciousness-Raising: 1970s Feminist Media Activism and Women Make Movies
  • Directing Hollywood: The American Film Institute’s Directing Workshop for Women

International Influences
STH B22
Shahla Haeri (chair), Pnina Lahav, Sara Mameni, Laura X

  • Golda Meir and the US Women’s Liberation Movement
  • The Problem-Solving Nuts: U.S. Feminism and the Iranian Revolution
  • Russian socialist influences on IWD resurrection which started our International Women’s History Archive

Pushing Their Limits: Toward an Expanded Understanding of the Women’s Movement
STH 113
Jeannette Estruth, Lana Povitz, Amanda Ricci

The Translation of Women’s Liberation into Law and Feminist Legal Theory and Practice
CAS B12
Linda McClain, Khiara Bridges, Aziza Ahmed, Elizabeth Schneider

  • How should we measure the success or failure of the women’s liberation movement in bringing about concrete changes in law and policy? How has feminist legal analysis developed in concrete areas (such as violence against women, reproductive rights, family and marriage law, work/family policy, and race and the law) that were critical to the movement and its demands for law reform?

Capturing the Moment: Photography of the Women’s Movement
CAS 211
Ellen Shub (chair), Joanne Donovan, Diana Mara Henry, Jo Freeman

  • Sharing women photographer’s images of movement activists engaged in the cultural, health and political issues of the time

Women Revolt: Publishing Feminists, Publishing Feminisms
CAS 222
Agatha Beins, Jennifer Gilley, Tessa Jordan, Julie R. Enszer

The Legacy and Lessons of Working-Class Feminism: Brooklyn’s National Congress of Neighborhood Women
CAS 226
Tamar Carroll, Christine Noschese, Susana Arellano

  • Recovering the contributions of working-class women and women of color to women’s liberation
  • Filmmaker to Organizer and Back: A Personal Documentary History of Working-class Women’s Activism, 1973-1980.
  • Making grassroots women’s leadership and activism visible/Inspiring the next generation

    5:00 Reception and Exhibition Opening
    Geena Davis: Actor and Advocate
    GSU Conference Auditorium
    From Geena Davis’ personal archive at the Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center
    6:00 The Bette Davis Foundation Awards Ceremony
    GSU Metcalf ballroom
    7:30 Films about Women’s Liberation in Boston/Cambridge
    GSU Metcalf Ballroom
    Susan Rivo and the 888 Women’s History Project, “Left on Pearl.”
    Catherine Russo, “A Moment in Her Story.”

Saturday, March 29

    8:30 Coffee
    9:30 Session 5

Click Here To See Session 5 Panels
Tools of Radical Feminist Analyzing, Organizing and Mobilizing: “Consciousness-Raising” and “History for Activist Use”
GSU Metcalf Ballroom
Annie Tummino, Carol Giardina, Kathie Sarachild, Marisa Figueiredo

Formative Years: The Birth of Our Bodies Ourselves
GSU Conference Auditorium
Joan Ditzion, Paula Doress-Worters, Nancy Miriam Hawley, Jane Pincus, Wendy Sanford

Competing Narratives about Sexuality and its Social Construction
Photonics 906
Rebecca Davis, Amy Kesselman, Megan Lieff, Artemis March

How Film Told Our Story: Documenting Second-Wave Feminism Through Film
STH B19
A roundtable discussion with the filmmakers
Rochelle Ruthchild (chair), Libby Bouvier, Joan Braderman, Liane Brandon, Jennifer Lee, Susie Rivo, Catherine Russo, Judith Smith

The Importance of Early Feminist Spaces from the Perspectives of their Founders
STH B20
Daphne Spain, Gilda Bruckman, Carol Downer, Simone Wallace

International Experiences
STH B22
Lisa Levenstein (chair), Jean Chapman, Jocelyn Olcott

  • Taking Global Feminism Online: The Beijing Women’s Conference of 1995
  • The women’s liberation movement in India: the face-off with patriarchy
  • International women’s year and the roots of NGOization

Liberation and Identity
STH 113
Anne Blaschke (chair), Joyce Antler, Betty Luther Hillman, Elizabeth More

  • Opportunities and limitations of 1970s women’s liberation for multiracial athletes
  • Uncovering a legacy of activism and social change: women’s liberation and Jewish identity
  • “The clothes I wear help me to know my own power”: Dress, hair, and self-presentation in feminist activism of the 1960s and 1970s
  • Sex Role Socialization and the Intellectual History of Feminism

Oral History of Cell 16, Female Liberation
CAS B12
Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Dana Densmore, Breanne Fahs

Las Mujeres de la Caucus Chicana (Women of the Chicana Caucus)
CAS 211
Linda Garcia Merchant, Rhea Mojica Hammer, Martha Cotera

Challenges and Alliances Across Boundaries of Race, Sexuality, and Class
CAS 313
Robyn Spencer (chair), Andrew Pope, Patricia Ulbrich, Christopher Ramsey, Chelsea Del Rio

  • “Our Incompleted Heritage”: Southern Radical Feminism in New Orleans, 1968-1985
  • Bridge Builders: Black Women in the Pittsburgh Women’s Movement
  • Southwest Women Working Together: Liberation, Integration, and Leadership on the Southwest Side of Chicago, 1968-1978
  • Looking to Lesbian Feminism: Opening Historical Narratives and Fostering Activist Alliances

Sexual Violence and Feminist Therapy
CAS 522
Mary Koss (chair), Judith Lewis Herman, Laura X, Ellen Sweet, Sarah Pearlman

 

    10:50 Coffee Break
    11:10 Session 6

Click Here To See Session 6 Panels
Comparing City Organizations: Different Approaches to Bringing Women Together
GSU Metcalf Ballroom
Linda Gordon (chair), Vivian Rothstein (Chicago), Tess Ewing (Boston Bread and Roses), Demita Frazier (Boston Combahee River Collective), Amy Kesselman (New Haven), Ros Baxandall (New York), Deborah Gerson (Bay Area)

Reproduction and Abortion
GSU Conference Auditorium
Pauline Bart, Robyn L. Rosen, Kelly O’Donnell

  • Abortion: Jane–They Did It Themselves
  • “When ‘the rest of the world joined up”: Planned Parenthood and the Politics of Reproduction in the Heyday of Women’s Liberation”
  • “Liberate yourself from your gynecologist”: Barbara Seaman, feminism, and consumer health activism, 1957-1977”

Women’s Liberation in the Halls of Congress: Bella Abzug, Shirley Chisholm, Patsy Mink
Photonics 906
Barbara Winslow (chair and commentator), Zinga Fraser, Judy Wu, Leandra Zarnow

Women’s Liberation Movement à la Québec: Revisiting narratives of the second wave feminist movement in Quebec
STH B19
Geneviève Pagé, Marie-Andrée Bergeron, Eve-Marie Lampron

  • The seeds of an intersectional analysis: Québécoise deboutte! And the theorization of multiple oppressions
  • The Québec feminist movement through 20 years of textual activism: The cases of Québécoises deboutte!, Les têtes de pioche and La Vie en rose
  • From Canon to Bullets: The use of (some) Women’s Liberation classic texts in Quebec’s prostitution/sex work battle

Art and Literature
STH B20
Pat Hills (chair), Barbara Gottfried (discussant), William Simmons, Roxanne Samer, Jane Grovijahn

Sharing stories through mobile technology to combat street harassment
STH B22
Britni de la Cretaz, Kate Ziegler (Hollaback!Boston)

  • How we’ve used technology to bring the consciousness-raising groups of the ’60s and ’70s into the present day.
  • We share our vision for a world without street harassment and offer community-based solutions to make all public space safe for everyone.

Student Activism and Perceptions Then and Now
STH 113
Sasha Goodfriend, Sarah Merriman, Sandra Gotovac, Amanda Robinson

  • Throwing Bricks & Secret Meetings: Harnessing Diversity of Tactics and Reassessing Frameworks to defeat a Goliath
  • The legacy of the women’s liberation movement: University student perceptions of present day feminism

The Personal, the Market, and the State
CAS B12
Hester Eisenstein, Zoe Newman, Eileen Boris, Leigh Dodson, Judy Gumbo Albert

Chicana Activism
CAS 211
Maria Cotera, Martha Cotera, Rose Marie Roybal

  • The Chicana Caucus of the NWPC: Small Group Organizing/Spaces of Empowerment
  • Liberating the feminist archive: The Chicana por mi raza digital oral history project

Organize! Women in 1960s Social Justice Movements Claim Women’s Rights
CAS 313
Dorothy Burlage (chair), Dorie Ladner, Mary King, Heather Tobis Booth

Women’s Liberation in Movement: Received, Reworked, Revised (Germany, Italy, France)
CAS 522
Tobe Levin (moderator), Halina Bendkowski, Liana Borghi, Judith Ezekiel, Claire Moses

  • US Influence on the WLM in Germany
  • Lesbian Feminism in Italy and the US and beyond
  • The Women’s Liberation Movement in the USA and France: Trans-Atlantic Sisterhood and (Mis)appropriation
  • The Double-Crossing of French Feminism

    12:30 Lunch
    1:30 ‘Feminist Songs to Stir the Blood(s)!’
    Conference Auditorium, George Sherman Union
    with Kristen Lems
    2:00 Session 7

Click Here To See Session 7 Panels
Revolutionary Women in the Underground and Beyond
GSU Metcalf Ballroom
Victoria Hesford (chair), Choonib Lee, Mary Phillips, Sarah Seidman
  • Revolutionary Chic: Women in the Weather Underground Organization
  • Ericka Huggins: A Catalyst in the Evolution of Gender Politics in the Black Panther Party
  • The Cuban Revolution and Angela Davis’s Radical Feminism.
  • Click here for the video

The Radical Roots of the National Women’s Political Caucus
GSU Conference Auditorium
Susan Smith Richardson (chair), Karen Engle, Sissy Farenthold, Ruth Mojica Hammer

A Revolution of Poets
Photonics 906
Louise Bernikow, Marge Piercy, Kate Rushin, Alta

  • Poets in our movement articulated a radical consciousness shared across time and space, race and class, and their work lives on. Our session situates them in history and celebrates as many as possible.


Hope, Change, and Feminist Activism in the American South from the 1960s through the 1990s
STH B19
Hannah Dudley-Shotwell, Jessica Wilkerson, Joey Fink, Melissa Estes Blair (discussant)

  • Self-help in a Feminist Women’s Health Center, Post-Roe v. Wade
  • To stay here you’re going to have to fight like hell: Grassroots Feminism in the Appalachian South
  • HOPE Works: From the 1970s Women’s Movement to a Woman-Centered Public Health and Anti-Poverty Project in Eastern North Carolina in the 1990s

Second Wave Organizations and Their Offspring (The Cambridge Women’s Center)
CAS B12
Rochelle Ruthchild, Libby Bouvier, Judy Norris, Janet Yassen, Soul Brown, Gina Scaramella

Lesbian/Feminism in Atlanta, Georgia (1970-1994)
CAS 211
Vicki Gabriner, Sally Gabb

Expanding and Redefining the Traditional Women’s Liberation Narrative
CAS 313
Rosalyn Baxandall, Judy Wu, Premilla Nadesen, Barbara Winslow

  • Hidden from History: The New York Day Care Struggles 1967-1979
  • Hypervisibility and Invisibility: Asian/American Women, Radical Orientalism, and the Revisioning of Global Feminism
  • Women’s Liberation and Welfare Rights: The Feminist Vision of Johnnie Tillmon
  • From “The Woman Question” to Women’s Liberation: The Socialist Origins of the Seattle Women’s Liberation Movement

Women, Psychology and the Women’s Liberation Movement: Transforming Psychology, Transforming Society
CAS 522
Joan Chrisler (chair), Irene Hanson Frieze, Leonore Tiefer, Maureen C. McHugh, Suzanna M. Rose

  • Building Sisterhood
  • The story of the Association for Women in Psychology (AWP), 1969-2014
  • Feminist Psychology: Transforming Science, Transforming Society
  • Changing Women’s Lives: Teaching Activism in Psychology of Women

    3:20 Coffee Break
    3:40 Session 8 (Closing Plenary)
    Keynote Address
    GSU Metcalf Ballroom
    Linda Gordon: Feminism Unfinished
    Introduced by Judith E. Smith
    Closing Songs
    Led by Marcia Deihl, Kristen Lems, and Deborah Silverstein
    Click here for the video