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Votes Are in: View the Best Dorm Room on Campus

Instagram contest solicited input on students’ interior design skills

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Forget beige walls and harsh fluorescent lighting. Melody You’s room in Danielsen Hall gives off a much more tranquil vibe.

You (COM’20) is the winner of the first-ever #BUCrib Dorm Decor contest, run by the Boston University social media team. The contest—which ran from October 16 through 19—pulled in 28 submissions and went through 4 rounds of voting via Instagram polls, which are new to the platform.

In the final round, over 1,800 votes were cast for You’s room, says contest organizer Emily Truax (COM’13, Questrom’18), assistant director of social media, adding that the team plans to hold the contest again in the future. Winner You received a BU throw pillow, pennant, and mug.

Margot McGreevy also entered the contest with a display of her time abroad, accentuating her room with pops of vivid color.

Margot McGreevy (CAS’18) entered the contest with a display of her time abroad, accenting her room with pops of vivid color.

The first thing you might notice about You’s sun-filled room is the large tapestry of a forest scene hanging above the bed. It’s from Urban Outfitters, and “it makes me feel like I’m in the woods,” says You, a Posse scholar and host of the WTBU show It’s Alt Good. “I have the view of the city out my window, so I wanted something that could bring me back to nature.”

Not pictured in the Instagram shot is the advertising major’s desk, a giant Gamma Phi Beta flag (she’s a proud member of the sorority), string lights, vases filled with (artificial) flowers, and a board holding cups. “Many of the cups are from my sorority, and I have some mason jars,” she says. “I’m actually not sure why I collect so many.”

You says she has always been interested in interior design, and once considered it as a career goal. She and her mom have shared a subscription to Architectural Digest since she was in elementary school.

Her room back home in Atlanta, Ga., was similarly decorated, she says, and many items made the move to Boston with her. “I wanted to bring pieces of my home to college, so that when I feel homesick, I’m comforted by knowing I’m sleeping in the same sheets as in high school.”

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    View submissions to the first annual #BUCrib Dorm Decor contest.

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    View submissions to the first annual #BUCrib Dorm Decor contest.

  • View submissions to the first annual #BUCrib Dorm Decor contest.

    View submissions to the first annual #BUCrib Dorm Decor contest.

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    View submissions to the first annual #BUCrib Dorm Decor contest.

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    View submissions to the first annual #BUCrib Dorm Decor contest.

  • 22580627_106033483494413_3313524778752540672_n

    View submissions to the first annual #BUCrib Dorm Decor contest.

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    View submissions to the first annual #BUCrib Dorm Decor contest.

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    View submissions to the first annual #BUCrib Dorm Decor contest.

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    View submissions to the first annual #BUCrib Dorm Decor contest.

6 Comments

6 Comments on Votes Are in: View the Best Dorm Room on Campus

  • Douglas Zook on 11.07.2017 at 10:07 am

    It is great that students are expressing some value of nature and integrating thoughtful art, but did the interior designers in this competition value contributing to a healthy, sustainable future…? Should not this be a necessary requirement-criteria for selections? Was the carbon footprint as well as plastic/synthetics emphasis of the room decor, clothing considered/calculated? Are all the lightbulbs non-tungsten energy savers? Are furniture items from wood that we know is not to be from trees of the assaulted rainforest regions? Are computers, lights turned to off when not in use as part of the living space energy-saving protocol? For sure, most of us are doing nearly enough to be part of the solutions, especially with our excesses, but giving back to nature (which ultimately means giving back to our survival) needs to be seen, whether we like it or not, as a top priority, given that all the basic survival needs around us — food, oxygen, water, energy, nutrient cycles are from earth systems now under severe threats. We cannot be even close to a 100% “fit”, but a nature-centered ethic is worth extending to as many phases of our lives as possible.

    • Marc on 11.07.2017 at 3:18 pm

      Hi Doug,
      I can’t answer all of the questions that you pose here but I can talk to the moveable wood furniture supplied by the University in student residences. Since 1989 we have purchased desks, dressers, bookcases and bed ends from New England Woodcraft of Forest Dale, VT. The lumber used in the construction of the furniture comes from sustained yield growth forests. New England Woodcraft is also a leading innovator in the development of non-solvent based finishing processes. Packaging materials are recycled and waste wood products, including scrap from production processes and pallets, are ground into sawdust and given to local Vermont dairy farmers for use as organic bedding material for livestock. New England Woodcraft is a local, family owned and veteran owned business. They are an industry leader in reducing pollutants and promoting the protection of our natural resources.

      Marc Robillard
      Assistant Vice President of Auxiliary Services

      • Douglas Zook on 11.08.2017 at 8:40 am

        Hi Marc, Great…thank you for this information. Wonderful to hear of this. Doug

    • Huh? on 11.07.2017 at 4:59 pm

      Douglas, with all due respect, I think this is a strange place to be coming out of the wood works to comment on an innocent enough endeavor of our students trying to make their dorm rooms feel a lot more like home than the stock dorm room experience, regardless of material choices and the like.

      • Douglas Zook on 11.08.2017 at 8:48 am

        Dear “huh,”
        You comment is somewhat reflective of the problem…we all need to embed our awareness of our dependency and connection to that which sustains us in whatever ways we can. Such questioning need not be taken as an attack against innocents of course, but as potentially worthwhile educational awakening. Thank you for your comment. Now back into the woodwork:) Doug

  • Environmental Health and Safety on 11.07.2017 at 10:58 am

    This comment comes directly from the Office of Environmental Health and Safety:
    Please review our Fire Safety page http://www.bu.edu/ehs/ehs-topics/fire-safety/ for BU’s Fire Safety restrictions in dorms. A couple useful tabs are Fire Safety Do’s and Don’ts,information includes what’s not allowed in dorms. Also Fire Safety for Students on and off Campus includes how to prevent electrical hazards.
    Additional safety information can be found on the Environmental Health and Safety website:
    http://www.bu.edu/ehs/

    For more information on dorm living contact an RA or Residential Life.

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