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Cricket Gets Some Respect (Again)

A popular sport abroad climbs out of baseball’s shadow here

11

When it comes to intercollegiate sports, cricket has been there and back—literally. In the late 19th century, teams from Harvard, Princeton, the University of Pennsylvania, and Columbia played regularly scheduled games as members of the Intercollegiate Cricket Association. Then came the 20th century, and cricket, once the national game of the United States, was pushed aside by a popular new sport called baseball. Now, thanks largely to students from South Asia, South Africa, and the West Indies, cricket is back on campuses across the country.

At BU, the 10-year-old Cricket Club is growing strong, playing under the auspices of American College Cricket, which has 68 member universities.

Club president Hayat Khan (SAR’14) says the club plays most weekends in the fall, and most of the competition is local. So far this year, the team has played Harvard twice, as well as Northeastern, Rutgers, and Long Island University, which is in Brooklyn, where, coincidentally, Khan grew up playing cricket with many immigrants from the West Indies. At BU, he says, most of the team hails from Pakistan and India, although some of their best players are Americans who had never played (or even had seen) cricket before coming to campus.

“We have a lot of beginners in our club, people who were born here, as well as people from China and Japan, where there’s no cricket at all,” says Pauvin Patel (ENG’08), a member of the team since 2004.

Khan says he hopes the growing popularity of cricket will persuade the NCAA to sanction the sport, which would lend it the respect it enjoys in many other countries. In the meantime, he says, all interested students are welcome to join the club’s practices, held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sundays in the SAO Gym, One University Road. For more information, send an email to cricket@bu.edu.

11 Comments
Joe Chan

Joe Chan can be reached at joechan@bu.edu.

11 Comments on Cricket Gets Some Respect (Again)

  • Patrick Maruska on 11.01.2012 at 12:21 pm

    So the first sentence missuses the word literally. Cricket has not literally been there and back. There and back in this context does NOT mean that it literally has gone somewhere and then come back.

    I don’t like being the guy that points stuff like this out, but this is an article that got published by BU Today. It’s just a little embarrassing to have literally (note the correct usage) the first sentence of an article have a very obvious error. I know it’s not a major article, just let’s try to have some pride. I would hope there is some sort of editorial process at BU Today, so I wonder how many people whose job it is to catch these types of things read this and didn’t catch it.

  • Rupert Manlove on 11.01.2012 at 3:48 pm

    http://www.bu.edu/today/2012/legal-fallout-from-the-rutgers-verdict/

    Search “Patrick Maruska” on that article.

  • Fred on 11.02.2012 at 6:36 am

    Having spent some schooling time in England, I am literally thrilled to hear about cricket having a ‘place’ in the BU community.
    I was a touch disheartened to see that the players were depicted on Harvard’s Jordan Field with the big H in the background! Maybe cricket has been there and back at BU, but apparently not yet on BU turf!

  • Tejas on 11.07.2012 at 7:32 am

    @Fred: The Cricket club does not have permission to invite non-BU students to BU facilities. So we basically play all competitive cricket “away”.

  • Jamie on 11.27.2012 at 12:52 pm

    Great article! And great to see the wonderful sport of Cricket getting some much deserved press! Good luck in the National Championships in Florida ;-)

  • Anonymous on 11.27.2012 at 1:16 pm

    I literally and figuratively will never understand this sport, indubitably.

  • Les on 11.27.2012 at 1:56 pm

    Having seen the great Viv Richards and Ian Botham play, I love the idea of playing intercollegiate cricket in the US.

    Small twchnical point: The video identifies only 2 ways of getting out, and there is at least one other — “LBW” (Leg Before Wicket.)

    Good Luck!!

  • sameer tyagi on 11.28.2012 at 10:48 am

    It has been and still is a GREAT Pastime. Indeed!

  • Craig Brown on 05.06.2013 at 7:03 pm

    I am looking for more information on US collegiate cricket. The email contact above does not work. Can someone assist ?

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