BU Today

Campus Life

Finally, It’s National Writing Day

GSU hosts celebration, workshops concerning that crucial craft

4
writing-with-pen_h.jpg

BU's events for the National Day on Writing include advice about poetry, screenwriting, rap lyrics, family biographies, and film reviews.

Aspiring writers, unite!

It may not be a holiday on the level of Independence Day, or even Columbus Day, but today, Tuesday, October 20, is National Day on Writing, and Boston University is celebrating.

The lineup of events being offered at the George Sherman Union is intended to showcase writing, help aspiring wordsmiths move onward and upward, and highlight writing’s impact on every aspect of our lives.

A writers fair kicks off at 10 a.m. and runs until 3 p.m. Stop by the GSU and help create a giant fridge magnet poem (see those arbitrary words come together in the collective subconscious) and make a 30-second writer’s testimonial video. Who says it’s a solitary craft?

Also from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., writers workshops are being held at various locations around the GSU. Topics include advice about poetry, screenwriting, rap lyrics, family biographies, flash fiction (beating writer’s block), film reviews, and PowerPoints. Don’t tense up about making a choice — there’s time enough to attend more than one session. Space is limited, so advance signup is recommended.

From 7 until 9 p.m., beatnik days return with coffeehouse readings in the GSU Back Court. Food and drink are on the house, but in return expect to read for about five minutes (no longer). The reading can be from original work or something inspirational, fiction or nonfiction, poetry, plays, stories, letters, or some surprising combination. And remember, if people snap their fingers, that means they like the performance.

Seth Rolbein can be reached at srolbein@bu.edu.

4 Comments

4 Comments on Finally, It’s National Writing Day

  • Kenn Elmore on 10.20.2009 at 8:58 am

    Love it! Celebrating words. I’m in. Planning on slamming a short portion of a James Baldwin essay with much meaning to me (during tonight’s coffeehouse at the GSU) – My Dungeon Shook.

    Words and writing make me think of music. With an ode to some of the great, modern wordsmithers: KRS-One; Lyte; Latifah; Marshall Mathers, and Speech, here’s my playlist for the today’s reading and writing:

    Move – Miles Davis
    Lush Life – John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman
    Fables Of Faubus – Charles Mingus Sextet with Eric Dolphy
    Cantaloupe Island – Herbie Hancock
    Chronology – Ornette Coleman
    Triptych: Prayer / Protest / Peace – Max Roach
    I Don’t Need No Doctor – John Scofield
    While My Lady Sleeps – John Coltrane
    The Peacocks – Esperanza Spalding
    I’m in the Mood for Love – James Moody
    Soul Makossa - Manu Dibango
    Rouge - Miles Davis
    Pt. I – Acknowledgement – John Coltrane Quartet
    Solitude – Herbie Hancock
    Naima - John Coltrane
    Dedicated to You – John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman
    Eventually – Ornette Coleman
    Fantasy – Miles Davis
    (Get Your Kicks On) Route 66 – Nat King Cole
    Lover Man – Chris Botti
    Violets for Your Furs - John Coltrane
    Body and Soul – Charles Mingus
    Perazela – Esperanza Spalding
    Godchild – Miles Davis
    Sinnerman – Nina Simone

    Peace.

    Kenn Elmore

  • Kenn Elmore on 10.20.2009 at 9:19 am

    Love it! Celebrating words. I’m in. Planning on slamming a short portion of a James Baldwin essay with much meaning to me (during tonight’s coffeehouse at the GSU) – “My Dungeon Shook.”

    Words and writing make me think of music. With an ode to some of the great, modern wordsmithers: KRS-One; Lyte; Latifah; Marshall Mathers, and Speech, here’s my playlist for tonight’s reading and writing:

    Move – Miles Davis
    Lush Life – John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman
    Fables Of Faubus – Charles Mingus Sextet with Eric Dolphy
    Cantaloupe Island – Herbie Hancock
    Chronology – Ornette Coleman
    Triptych: Prayer / Protest / Peace – Max Roach
    I Don’t Need No Doctor – John Scofield
    While My Lady Sleeps – John Coltrane
    The Peacocks – Esperanza Spalding
    I’m in the Mood for Love – James Moody
    Soul Makossa - Manu Dibango
    Rouge - Miles Davis
    Pt. I – Acknowledgement – John Coltrane Quartet
    Solitude – Herbie Hancock
    Naima - John Coltrane
    Dedicated to You – John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman
    Eventually – Ornette Coleman
    Fantasy – Miles Davis
    (Get Your Kicks On) Route 66 – Nat King Cole
    Lover Man – Chris Botti
    Violets for Your Furs - John Coltrane
    Body and Soul – Charles Mingus
    Perazela – Esperanza Spalding
    Godchild – Miles Davis
    Sinnerman – Nina Simone

    Peace.

    Kenn Elmore

  • Anonymous on 10.20.2009 at 10:34 am

    This sounds like it would be great as a regular event — perhaps weekly.

  • Anonymous on 10.20.2009 at 4:15 pm

    A warmup for NaNoWriMo

    I see this as a warmup for NaNoWriMo: National Novel Writer’s Month. Last year I took the challenge and completed a 52,000 word novellette in the month of November. The Boston Marathon takes lots of physical training and dedication – All it takes to write a novel is energized insanity and a way with words. I chose the latter :)

Post Your Comment

(never shown)