BU Today

In the World

Eliminating Educational Inequity

Teach for India is looking for students to teach in Mumbai and Pune

+
teachforindia_h.jpg

Teach for India offers recent graduates the opportunity to make a difference in the lives of young Indian students.

Teach for India has an offer for those interested in making education more accessible for the children of India.

The program, which aims to eliminate educational inequity in India and is loosely based on its American counterpart, Teach for America, places young professionals working full time and students in their final year of an undergraduate or postgraduate degree in two underprivileged areas in India to teach, Mumbai and Pune. Teach for India fellows commit to two years of training and teaching.  

Program representative Kate Polacikova (SMG’12) recommends applying as soon as possible. The next application is due November 22, and the last January 10. “Student apply online,” Polacikova says. “If they are accepted, then a phone interview will be scheduled with a representative in India. A second interview then occurs in person in New York or California.” 

Once accepted, program fellows are sent for a four-week training period in their host city, where they are taught teaching strategies for working with children in grades two to five. The training period precedes a two-year fellowship that includes creating a community service project.

“Although two years seem like a big commitment,” Polacikova says, “in order to make some sort of progress, these years are needed to adjust to teaching and to truly make an impact in the lives of the children.” 

As well as making a difference to young children in India, she says, the program helps those completing the two-year commitment find jobs and apply to graduate school.

A Teach for India information session will be held Thursday, November 12, at 5 p.m. at the Career Services Office, 19 Deerfield St., third floor. More information is available here or e-mail Navkiran Brar at nbrar@bu.edu.

Nicole Rojas can be reached at nrojas@bu.edu.

+ Comments

Post Your Comment

(never shown)