Welcome to The Nerve, Boston University’s neuroscience magazine!

The Nerve Spring 2011

The Nerve Spring 2011

Stressed? It may be in your genes…

April 13th, 2010

With finals around the corner, the stress factor on campus is bound to rise in the next few weeks. Individual students have their own way of coping with stress, such as TV, video games, music, power naps at Mugar Library (the cubbies are quite comfortable) or a marathon visit to FitRec. Regardless of the method, all aim to reduce the anxiety of coming exams.
Read the rest of this blog post by Frank Devita here.

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Welcome to The Nerve!

April 13th, 2010

Welcome to our new website! We are proud to present to you our efforts in editing the second issue of BU’s neuroscience magazine, The Nerve, which comes out in print this month! Meanwhile, feel free to browse our blog and first issue.

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An Analysis of the Two Theories of Recognition Memory

April 10th, 2010


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An Analysis of the Two Theories of Recognition Memory
By Danielle Miller.
INTRODUCTION
Recognition memory is a particular aspect of memory that provides the ability for an individual to identify a previously encountered stimulus. There are two theories as to how recognition memory operates. One theory proposes that there are two distinct processes involved in the recognition of a stimulus, called recollection and familiarity (Eichenbaum et al. 2007). Another theory, however, denies the independence of the two processes within recognition memory. In this theory, familiarity is primarily thought of as a weak memory, whereas recollection is considered to be a type of strong memory (Squire et al. 2007).
This paper aims to take a closer look at both theories by exploring evidence that supports each one. A deeper evaluation of the dual process model and single process model will be made in order to explore all aspects of recognition memory.  The paper will provide the reader with a background sufficient for understanding all aspects that are currently proposed about recognition memory.

A Review by Danielle Miller

Recognition memory is a particular aspect of memory that provides the ability for an individual to identify a previously encountered stimulus. There are two theories as to how recognition memory operates. One theory proposes that there are two distinct processes involved in the recognition of a stimulus, called recollection and familiarity (Eichenbaum et al. 2007). Another theory, however, denies the independence of the two processes within recognition memory. In this theory, familiarity is primarily thought of as a weak memory, whereas recollection is considered to be a type of strong memory (Squire et al. 2007).

This paper aims to take a closer look at both theories by exploring evidence that supports each one. A deeper evaluation of the dual process model and single process model will be made in order to explore all aspects of recognition memory.  The paper will provide the reader with a background sufficient for understanding all aspects that are currently proposed about recognition memory.

Continue reading here.

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