Broken Cities

Are you interested in playing a game about the costs of climate change?

Join us on April 19th!

broken cities

 

 


The Broken Cities game is designed to help participants understand the complex issues facing citizens and decision-makers as climate change contributes to new urban variables, such as less predictable seasonal precipitation patterns and increased frequency of extreme events, like droughts, flooding, heat waves and cold spells.

In spite of more than twenty years of negotiations at a national and international level, action on climate change is still led by cities and other local level initiatives. For the first time, the majority of the world’s population lives in cities, which accounts for more than 70% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

There remains, however, a drastic need to scale up our responses to climate change in terms of both mitigative and adaptive actions. This will require a better understanding of the effects of local and regional climate change and how we can work together to address them.

In this KlimaLab and Earth Day Network Event, we invite you to participate with us in taking initiative to test out new ideas in response to a climate reality that requires urgent action. We look forward to doing this in a fun and unique gaming atmosphere that builds connections across universities from around the world.

The event is sponsored by Norden Top-level Research Initiative in Interdisciplinary research: theories and applications in urban climate change adaptation, The Danish Society of Engineers, Aalborg Municipality and realised by KlimaLab, Aalborg University, and the Earth Day Network in collaboration with Portland State University, Boston University, and Helsinki University.

The event will take place on Friday, April 19 2013 11am-2pm at 808 Commonwealth Ave Room 109. Please RSVP by April 15 by emailing ersilva@bu.edu.

Co-sponsored by Boston University Metropolitan College, Department of City Planning and Urban Affairs and the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future.

Comments are closed.