Nutrition

Course details for summer 2015 will be available on December 15. The courses below were offered in summer 2014 and can serve as a guide to what is typically offered.

Colleges: College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences (Sargent College) | Metropolitan College

College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences (Sargent College)

Human Nutrition Science

SAR HS 251

Prereq: (CAS BI 105 or CAS BI 108). An introduction to nutrition with a focus on the relationship between diet and health. Basic scientific information is presented in preparation for discussion of applied issues such as weight management and prevention of chronic disease. Emphasis is placed on translation of current dietary recommendations to actual food choices. 4 cr.

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Human Nutrition Science

SAR HS 551

Prereq: (CAS BI 105 or CAS BI 108). An introduction to nutrition with a focus on the relationship between diet and health. Basic scientific information is presented in preparation for a discussion of applied issues such as weight management and prevention of chronic disease. Emphasis is placed on translation of current dietary recommendations to actual food choices. 4 cr.

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Field Experience in Nutrition

SAR HS 703

For students completing the DI for professional registration by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Variable cr.

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Practicum: Nutrition

SAR HS 811

Structured clinical learning experience for graduate nutrition students. Placement sites include in- and outpatient facilities, adult and pediatric hospitals, public health agencies, private agencies, newsletter agencies, and long-term care facilities. Variable cr.

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Metropolitan College

Special Topics in Gastronomy

MET ML 610

Topic for 2014: The Science of Food and Cooking. Cooking is chemistry and it is the chemistry of food that determines the outcome of culinary undertakings. In this course, basic chemical properties of food are explored in the context of modern and traditional cooking techniques. The impact of molecular changes resulting from preparation, cooking, and storage is the focus of academic inquiry. Illustrative, culturally specific culinary techniques are explored through the lens of food science and the food processing industry. Examination of “chemistry-in-the-pan” and sensory analysis techniques will be the focus of hands-on, in-class and assigned cooking labs. 4 cr.

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Special Topics in Gastronomy

MET ML 610

Topic for 2014: Wild and Foraged Foods. Humans have been foraging for food since prehistoric times but the recent interest in wild and foraged foods raises interesting issues about our connection to nature amid the panorama of industrially oriented food systems. From political economy to Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) this course explores how we interact with, perceive, and know our world through the procurement of food. Students take part in foraging activities and hands-on culinary labs in order to engage the senses in thinking about the connections between humans, food, and the environment. 4 cr.

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Special Topics in Gastronomy

MET ML 610

Topic for 2014: Food Values: Local to Global Food Policy, Practice, and Performance. Reviews various competing and sometimes conflicting frameworks for assessing what are “good” foods. Examines what global, national, state, and local food policies can do to promote the production and consumption of these foods. Participants learn how to conceptualize, measure, and assess varying ecological, economic, nutritional, health, cultural, political, and justice claims. We analyze pathways connecting production and consumption of particular foodstuffs in the U.S. and the world. Emphasis is on comparative food systems and food value chains, and the respective institutional roles of science and technology, policy, and advocacy in shaping food supply and demand. 4 cr.

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Special Topics in Gastronomy

MET ML 610

Topic for 2014: Approaches to Feeding Children. Even as a new food culture has arisen, one that is devoted to fresh, local, and authentic foods, we are still offering our children highly processed foods having little nutritional value. Indeed, children are besieged with cultural messages of all kinds, often contradictory, in regard to food. By looking at how families all along the economic spectrum provide for their children, this course deciphers the cultural meanings behind the foods children are being fed. Students will do research on such topics as childhood nutrition, school lunches, edible schoolyards, and farm-to-school practices. Food stamps, SNAP, junk food, fast food, and advertising to children will also be discussed. 4 cr.

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Nutrition and Diet: Why What You Eat Matters

MET ML 691

Introduces major concepts in nutrition and diet to students of food studies and other disciplines who have limited or no background in the biological sciences. The overarching goal is to develop a working understanding of the basic science of nutrition and apply this knowledge to personal health and professional settings. The course begins with the fundamentals of nutrition and diet, focusing on macro- and micronutrient intakes and needs throughout the life course. Food-based nutrition is discussed, alongside dietary guidelines, recommendations, and food labels. Moving from the individual level to the larger public health arena, we also examine such topics as nutritional ecology, influences on dietary intakes, overnutrition, and undernutrition. A running theme throughout will be critiquing how diet and nutrition are treated in the media and press. 4 cr.

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