Metropolitan College

Courses in: Actuarial Science | Administrative Sciences | Advertising | Arts Administration | Computer Science | Criminal Justice | Distance Education/Online | Earth Sciences | Gastronomy | Psychology | Sociology | Urban Affairs

Metropolitan College

Actuarial Science

Group Insurance Applications of Actuarial Principles

MET AT 752

Covers the application of basic actuarial principles to group life and group health financial security systems. Material covered includes the purpose of these systems, financial security product design and development, underwriting and risk management, premium determination, and the funding and valuation of group life and group health financial security systems. Group systems in the United States are emphasized, but the course also reviews the Canadian health system. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Pension Mathematics and Mortality Tables

MET AT 782

Prereq: (MET MA581 or CAS MA581) and MET AT721. Covers pension actuarial funding methods and the use of life contingencies. Included are analyses of the funding methods allowable under ERISA, their computation, and uses. Also reviews the use of mortality tables, and discusses the various actuarial functions that are used in pension actuarial calculations. Finally, the course reviews implications for pension funding under the IRS. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Internship in Actuarial Science II

MET AT 982

Grad Prereq: MET AT722 and AT731 and cumulative GPA of 3.3 or higher and consent of instructor. Offered to students who seek practical applications of actuarial principles in insurance companies, financial institutions, pension consulting firms, and other related fields. Requires students to participate in an internship program with industry. Students need to submit monthly progress reports and a final semester report to the Chairman, Department of Actuarial Science at Boston University. Variable cr. Tuition: $780 per credit

Twelve-week course (May 20-August 8)

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SAS with Statistical Applications

MET MA 603

Prereq: MET MA214. Offers a unified and in-depth coverage of the statistical computer package SAS, and its statistical applications. Topics include the language of SAS, data formatting, creating and storing SAS data sets, file manipulations, macro procedure, and graphics. Also included are procedures for statistical techniques selected from analysis of variance, regression, factor analysis, scoring, and categorical data analysis. Several large data sets are used as case studies emphasizing hands-on experience with SAS for Windows. Laboratory course. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Administrative Sciences

Accounting I

MET MG 101

Basic principles of financial accounting underlying transaction analysis and the preparation of financial statements. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Personal Financial Planning

MET MG 202

The development of personal investment strategies using money and credit. Securities and portfolio management, budgeting, insurance, taxes, retirement programs, and estate planning. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Introduction to Management

MET MG 301

Management of an enterprise from the perspective of the chief executive officer. Covers the functions of organizing for successful management. Survey of theories and techniques. Examination of case studies. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Principles of Finance

MET MG 304

Prereq: MET MG 101. Introduction to tools of financial analysis and problems of financial management, including cash, profitability, and capital budgeting. Various sources of corporate funds are considered, including short-, intermediate-, and long-term arrangements. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Business Communication

MET MG 310

Organization and techniques for effective verbal and written communication in the business environment. Emphasis on developing communication skills through practical written and oral assignments. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Entrepreneurial Management: Starting, Innovating, and Managing Small-, Medium-, and Large-Sized Ventures

MET MG 410

Covers the four key elements of successful entrepreneurial management: choosing a business, organizing, financing, and marketing. Includes preparing a business plan, becoming an entrepreneur, raising venture capital, selling, negotiating, and building an effective organization. Topics given special consideration are the practice of innovation, the art of leadership, and how to relate talents to succeeding in an innovative managed venture and technology management. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Project Management

MET MG 415

Examination of project management concepts, including organizational forms, planning and control techniques, and the role of the project manager. Develops the skills vital to effective management of multidisciplinary tasks through lectures, case studies, and business simulations. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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International Marketing

MET MG 431

Organization of the marketing function in international business. How government policies and practices affect marketing. Comparative marketing strategies for doing business abroad. Examination of case studies. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Advertising

MET MG 435

The structure and operating procedures of advertising agencies and corporate advertising departments in relation to marketing. Active student participation in learning how advertising strategies and concepts are developed and executed. Includes readings, development of advertising strategies, screenings, and analysis of contemporary advertising. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Electronic Commerce, Systems, and Web Design

MET MG 448

First course in a two course sequence. Combines (1) the practical aspect of web design through the use of application software such as Dreamweaver to construct a commercial website with (2) a general overview of the marketing, supporting services, systems, security, and business strategy issues facing commercial enterprises. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Financial Concepts

MET MG 472

Emphasizes issues of accounting, finance, and economics that are important in most management contexts. Introduction to tools of financial analysis and the problems of financial management including cash, profitability, and capital budgeting. Various sources of corporate funds are considered - short-, intermediate-, and long-term arrangements. Stresses understanding financial statements, planning and control, cost and benefit evaluation, cash flow analysis, and capital budgeting. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Business in a Changing Society

MET MG 503

Examination of the management process and the social environment in which organizations operate, including a discussion of the manager's responsibilities to employees, customers, stockholders, and society. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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International Business Management

MET MG 520

Environmental, economic, political, and social constraints on doing business abroad. Examines the effects of overseas business investments on domestic and foreign economics; foreign market analysis and operational strategy of a firm; and development potential of international operations. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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The Innovation Process: Developing New Products and Services

MET MG 541

Addresses the specifics of new product and service development as well as the aspects of internal innovation and the use of technology to increase performance in small, medium, and large firms. Topics include generating and screening initial ideas; assessing user needs and interests; forecasting results; launching and/or improving products/services; and bringing innovation to commercial reality. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Business Communication for International Students

MET AD 501

Techniques for effective written and verbal communications. Course is a special offering for students for whom English is a second language. Departmental approval required for non-MSAS students. Prerequisite course: credits can not be used toward the MSAS degree. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Mathematics for Management

MET AD 510

An overview of fundamental mathematical concepts, with emphasis on the solution of word problems. Topics covered include quadratic equations, signed numbers, polynomials, graphs, roots and radicals, and basic concepts of differential and integral calculus. Prerequisite course which may not be used toward graduate credit. 2 cr. Tuition: $1200

Summer 1 (June 14-June 22)

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Financial and Managerial Accounting

MET AD 630

Introduction to the concepts, methods, and problems of financial and managerial accounting. Includes data accumulation, accounting principles, financial statement analysis, measurement and disclosure issues, cost analysis, budgeting and control, production costs, and standard costs. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Financial Concepts

MET AD 632

Introduction to the concepts, methods, and problems of accounting and financial analysis. Includes accounting principles, measurement and disclosure issues, financial statement analysis, time value of money, cash flow projection and analysis, capital budgeting and project evaluation, bond and equity valuation, cost of capital, and capital structure. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Project Management

MET AD 642

Examines concepts and applied techniques for cost-effective management of both long-term development programs and smaller short-term projects. Special focus on planning, controlling, and coordinating efforts of multiple individuals and/or working groups. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Project Risk and Cost Management

MET AD 644

This course introduces the art and science of project risk as well as continuity management and cost management. Managing the risk of a project as it relates to a three-part systematic process of identifying, analyzing, and responding is examined through actual case studies. Students learn how to manage the components of a project to assure it can be completed through both general and severe business disruptions on local, national, and international levels. Students learn the process of cost management, early cost estimation, detailed cost estimation, and cost control using earned value method. Students study in depth the issues of project procurement management and the different types of contracts for various scope scenarios. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Introduction to Electronic Commerce, Systems, and Web Design

MET AD 648

A detailed examination of how businesses can successfully use Internet and web technology. Students are introduced to the concepts and issues of electronic commerce. Topics include comparison of e-commerce procedures, payment mechanisms, applications in different industry sectors, security, the challenges of starting and maintaining an electronic business site, as well as a comparison with traditional business practices. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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International Business, Economics & Cultures

MET AD 655

Considers macroeconomic factors of relevance to the firm: aggregate economic activity, cyclical movements, and fiscal and monetary policies. Reviews the problems of decision-making related to demand, production, costs, market structure, and price; as well as provides an analysis of the interplay between governments, economic systems, labor, and multinational corporations (MNCs). Topics include the basis for the existence, organization, and growth of MNCs; a comparison of major economic and government systems; areas include the impact on the firm's business transactions and trade due to taxation, regulation, legal environment, and labor influences. Additionally investigates the relationship between the interaction of national culture and development. Topics range from developing nations' rain forest and species management to pollution generated by developed nations. Culture, policy, and development are also discussed in relation to the impact of the business interactions (agriculture, fishing, technology transfer, etc.) among developing and developed nations. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Innovation, Global Competitiveness, and National Economic Development

MET AD 667

Examines various approaches to developing high tech innovation-based economies as a route to self sufficiency and growth. Factors studied include both structural reforms in the political, legal and economic areas, and government sponsored initiatives in higher education, basic research, private venture capital, grants to support new product development by promising ventures, and the creation of science and technology parks and incubators. Students independently research, write, and present studies of the strategies of various countries. This will be augmented by case studies, reading, and guest speakers on strategies being employed in such countries as Taiwan, Thailand, and Brazil. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Financial Markets and Institutions

MET AD 712

Prereq: MET AD 731. Investigation and analysis of organization, structure, and performance of U.S. money and capital markets and institutions. Examines regulation of the financial industry and the role of financial instruments. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Mergers and Acquisitions

MET AD 714

Examines the process by which takeovers and other corporate control transactions take place. Of particular interest are the defensive measures by management against hostile bids, buyout transactions, the relation of takeovers to capital structure changes, and insider trading in takeover contests. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Quantitative and Qualitative Decision-Making

MET AD 715

Explores decision-making and policy formulation in organizations. Includes goal setting and the planning process, rational models of decision-making, evaluation of alternatives, prediction of outcomes, cost-benefit analysis, decision trees, uncertainty and risk assessment, and procedures for evaluation of outcomes. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management

MET AD 717

Prereq: MET AD 731. Mechanics of securities markets, types of available investments, an introduction to determination of securities values, and portfolio optimization. Problems of investment policy are approached through studies of portfolio selection methods and the valuation of special classes of securities (e.g., growth stocks). 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Negotiations and Organizational Conflict Resolution

MET AD 725

Communication skills course designed to better understand the nature of conflict and its resolution through persuasion, collaboration, and negotiation. Students learn theories of interpersonal and organizational conflict and their resolution as applied to personal, corporate, historical, and political contexts. Students assess their own styles, skills, and values, and develop techniques to better resolve disputes, achieve objectives, and exert influence. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Corporate Finance

MET AD 731

Prereq: MET AD 630. Emphasizes issues of accounting, finance, and economics that are important in most management contexts. Stresses understanding financial statements, planning and control, cost and benefit evaluation, cash flow analysis, and capital budgeting. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Leadership in Management

MET AD 733

A comprehensive overview of leadership skills and abilities through an examination of traditional and contemporary models of leadership. Students examine personal attitudes and perceptions as they relate to their leadership abilities and explore such areas as team building, motivation, and reward. This course includes a weekend at Nature's Classroom at Sargent Center in New Hampshire from June 6-8. The program fee includes room and board for this weekend of experiential learning. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120; program fee: $240; total charge: $3360

Summer 1 (May 21-June 18)

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The Innovation Process: Developing New Products and Services

MET AD 741

Studies the global challenge of innovation and the impact of marketing and management issues on the development of new products and services and their introduction. Concepts for creating added value are applied to a range of innovations, radical and incremental, technological and procedural, and in different settings such as start-up companies and large corporations. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Venture Capital and Financing Innovation

MET AD 744

Prereq: MET AD 731. An analysis of the economics of innovation and the means by which firms secure the necessary capital to begin or expand operations. Discusses procedures for raising venture capital through investment institutions and individuals. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Competitive Strategies for Dynamic Environments

MET AD 745

Reviews the process whereby organizations establish and pursue goals within internal and external constraints, resources, and opportunities. Topics include strategy and tactics; the process of strategic choice and adjustment; resource assessment; environmental and competitor analysis; stakeholders and values; and strategy implementation, control, and valuation. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Business Law and Regulation in a Global Environment

MET AD 746

Examines legal issues that affect high-technology firms. Topics include copyright, reverse engineering, trade secrets, patents, international legal differences, the Uniform Commercial Code, and product liability. Cases drawn from high-tech industries are used to emphasize current and future developments. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Multinational Finance and Trade

MET AD 763

Grad Prereq: (MET AD 731). Applies the concepts of corporate finance to the problems of multinational financial management. Major topics include private and public institutions, foreign exchange rates, capital flows, speculation, analysis of alternative foreign investments, analysis of sources and uses of corporate funds abroad, multinational tax and profit planning, international risk analysis, and capital budgeting. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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International Business Simulation

MET AD 773

Through the use of an international business simulation, students develop the ability to manage in the shifting international environment by integrating finance, strategy, and marketing skills to expand their company globally. By selling, exporting, or manufacturing in up to fourteen countries the simulation is intended to provide the student with a "real life" approach to international expansion, environmental stability, inflation and currency issues, financial operations, as well as international sales and manufacturing issues. The objective of the course is to offer an overview of the factors affecting global business operations in a stimulating learning environment that is enjoyable and challenging. Intensive course. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (April 30-May 15)

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Marketing Strategies

MET AD 857

eLive offering. Strategic and operational marketing issues arising in the firm's operations. Topics include market screening, decisions, entry strategies, product/service development, as well as designing the marketing plan and its implementation. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 28-June 22)

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Advertising

Principles and Practices of Advertising

MET CM 708

Provides an application driven overview of the advertising industry. Content includes a breakdown of the foundations of advertising in general, an overview of the agency structure, market/brand analysis, target audience definition and an understanding of consumer insight. The principles of creative strategy and execution are introduced, along with media basics. Students, in teams, apply content from the course through a simulation of a digital marketing problem provided by an industry professional. Through this simulation students have the opportunity to apply strategic concepts and creative executions thus gaining an understanding of a number of traditional and new advertising practices. Permission required for non-MET students. Contact Metropolitan College, 755 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 103 (617-353-3000) for more information. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Video in the Digital Age

MET CM 714

Prereq: MET CM 716, MET CM 717, or MET CM 744. The role of video has become even more significant in terms of the digital environment for branded content, webisodes, viral video, corporate micro-documentaries, and instructional/educational website content. How this is integrated with, and disseminated by, social media is key. In addition, budgetary constraints in relation to work for the web often require a different creative approach than traditional broadcast media. This course explores the creative development of video concepts and introduces students to basic production techniques as they relate to the development of video geared for the web. This is mainly a writing and concept development course. Some rudimentary editing techniques are discussed throughout the semester. Permission required for non-MET students. Contact Metropolitan College, 755 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 103 (617-353-3000) for more information. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Digital Communication

MET CM 716

Designed to introduce students to using new media tools for creating media communication. Students build an integrated campaign and website using Photoshop, InDesign, iMovie, Dreamweaver, and Flash. Students develop an understanding of the process of design consisting of ideation, strategy, and execution. Permission required for non-MET students. Contact Metropolitan College, 755 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 103 (617-353-3000) for more information. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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New & Traditional Media Strategies

MET CM 736

Prereq: MET CM708. Examines media planning, buying, and sales as performed by advertising agencies, clients, and the media. Evaluates research sources that provide data on media audiences and product usage. Examines contemporary trends in communications media and their effects on advertisers. Permission required for non-MET students. Contact Metropolitan College, 755 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 103 (617-353-3000) for more information. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Arts Administration

Capital Campaigns

MET AR 711

This course is designed to broaden the student's understanding of capital campaign fundraising. Topics include: feasibility studies; strategic planning and budgeting; private and public phases; ethical responsibilities; staff, donor, volunteer, board, and trustee management; major gift solicitation; campaign communications; trend analysis; and evaluation. The course curriculum includes readings, case studies, guest speakers, and analysis of current capital campaign projects. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Comparative Cultural Policy and Administration

MET AR 777

Grad Prereq: MET AR690. Prereq: MET AR690. Examines the nature of cultural policy in the United States, United Kingdom, and the European Union from 1950 to the present. Through lectures and readings drawn from public policy, economics, and law, this course discusses the impact of cultural and national differences on the cultural policy decision-making process. Meets on the Boston University Charles River campus for four weeks prior to a week in London. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (June 3-July 15)

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Special Topics

MET AR 781

Topic for Summer 2014: Managing the Arts in Higher Education. Through select readings, case studies, and guest speakers, this course examines the value and place of the arts on a college campus, explores the variety of arenas in which one can find the arts on campus, and considers key skills useful in nurturing and managing arts programs and activities in this unique setting. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Cultural Entrepreneurship

MET AR 789

Explores the emerging field of cultural entrepreneurship. The course covers a variety of topics, including the artist as entrepreneur; new business models for arts organizations; art and social change; and the role of entrepreneurs in cultural organizations. Through case studies, guest speakers, readings, and group exercises, students will learn about innovative entrepreneurial initiatives that straddle the boundaries between the private, nonprofit, and public sectors. Guided exercises enable students to assess and develop their skills as future change agents. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Internship in Arts Administration

MET AR 802

Two consecutive two-credit courses for planning (AR 802) and fieldwork (AR 803) phases of the internship. Arts Administration degree students only. 2 cr. Tuition: $1560

Summer 1 (June 2-August 4)

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Internship in Arts Administration II

MET AR 803

Two consecutive two-credit courses for planning (AR 802) and fieldwork (AR 803) phases of the internship. Students may not register for MET AR 803, or begin their actual internship until they have completed a minimum of six of the ten required courses. Arts Administration degree students only. 2 cr. Tuition: $1560

Summer 1 (June 2-August 4)

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Computer Science

For more information on our blended eLive format courses, visit www.bu.edu/met/elive.

Computers and Their Applications

MET CS 101

For students with no previous experience with computers. Organization and function of computer systems; application of computers in today's society; social impact of computers. Introduction to algorithms and various types of application packages and the Internet. Not for computer science majors. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Fundamentals of Information Technology

MET CS 200

A technically-oriented introductory survey of information technology. Students learn about basic computer information, different types of business systems and basic systems analysis, design, and development. Students also study basic mathematics, software development, and create simple Java programs. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Twelve-week course (May 21-August 6)

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Introduction to Programming

MET CS 201

Introduction to problem-solving methods and algorithm development. Includes procedural and data abstractions, program design, debugging, testing, and documentation. Covers data types, control structures, functions, parameter passing, library functions, and arrays. Laboratory exercises in C++. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Programming with C++

MET CS 231

Prereq: (MET CS 201) or instructor's consent. Covers the elements of object-oriented programming and the C++ language. Data types, control structures, functions, library functions, classes, inheritance, and multiple inheritance. Use of constructors, destructors, function and operator overloading, reference parameters and default values, friend functions, input and output streams, templates, and exceptions. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Programming with Java

MET CS 232

Prereq: (MET CS 201) or instructor's consent. Covers the elements of object-oriented programming and the Java Programming Language. Primitive data types, control structures, methods, classes, arrays and strings, inheritance and polymorphism, interfaces, creating user interfaces, applets, exceptions and streams. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Discrete Mathematics

MET CS 248

Fundamentals of logic (the laws of logic, rules of inferences, quantifiers, proofs of theorems), Fundamental principles of counting (permutations, combinations), set theory, relations and functions, graphs, trees and sorting, shortest path and minimal spanning trees algorithms. Monoids and Groups. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Data Structures with Java

MET CS 342

Prereq: (MET CS 232) or instructor's consent. Covers data structures using the Java Programming Language. Topics include data abstraction, encapsulation, information hiding, and the use of recursion, creation, and manipulation of various data structures: lists, queues, tables, trees, heaps, and graphs, and searching and sorting algorithms. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Introduction to Web Application Development

MET CS 401

Prereq: (MET CS 231 or MET CS 232) or instructor's consent. Focuses on building core competencies in web design and development. Begins with a complete immersion into HTML, essentially XHTML and Dynamic HTML (DHTML). Students are exposed to Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), as well as Dynamic CSS. Fundamentals of JavaScript language including object-oriented JavaScript are covered comprehensively. AJAX with XML and JSON are covered, as they are the primary means to transfer data from client and server. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Twelve-week course (May 21-August 6)

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Introduction to Business Data and Communication Networks

MET CS 425

eLive offering. Prereq: MET CS 201 and (MET CS 231 or MET CS 232) or instructor's consent. Basic concepts of data communications and computer networks; hardware, software, and reference models; TCP/IP protocol suit. Overview of voice communication, LAN, network development life cycle, security, and management. IT Economics: Total Cost Ownership, Return on Investment and IT Project Portfolio Management. Restrictions: May not be taken in conjunction with CS 535 or CS 625. Only one of these courses can be counted towards degree requirements. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 20-June 27)

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Introduction to IT Project Management

MET CS 432

Provides a comprehensive overview of IT Project Management and the key processes associated with planning, organizing, and controlling of software Projects. The course will focus on various knowledge areas such as: project scope management, risk management, quality management, communications management, and integration management. Students will be required to submit a term paper. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

This course can be taken either on campus (section C1) or as an eLive offering (section EL). The C1 section meets on campus every Tuesday throughout the twelve weeks. The EL section meets on campus on five Tuesdays and online during the intervening weeks.

Twelve-week course (May 20-August 5)

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Introduction to Database Design and Implementation for Business

MET CS 469

Database concepts, relational and entity-relationship (ER) data models, normalization, object-relational modeling, database life cycle, the Structured Query Language (SQL). Preview of advanced database concepts, including transaction management, performance tuning, distributed databases, and data warehousing. Includes undergraduate-level exercises, quizzes, final, and an optional term project. Restriction: May not be taken in conjunction with CS 579 or CS 669. Only one of these courses can be counted toward degree requirements. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

This course can be taken either on campus (section C1) or as an eLive offering (section EL). The C1 section meets on campus every Wednesday throughout the twelve weeks. The EL section meets on campus on five Wednesdays and online during the intervening weeks.

Twelve-week course (May 21-August 6)

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Computer Architecture

MET CS 472

Prereq: (MET CS 231 or MET CS 232) or instructor's consent. Computer organization with emphasis on processors, memory, and input/output. Includes pipelining, ALUs, caches, virtual memory, parallelism, measuring performance, and basic operating systems concepts. Discussion of assembly language instruction sets and programming as well as internal representation of instructions. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Computer Networks

MET CS 535

Prereq: MET CS 575 and MET CS 201 or MET CS 231 or MET CS 232; or instructor's consent. Overview of data communication and computer networks, including network hardware and software, as well as reference models, example networks, data communication services and network standardization. OSI and the Internet (TCP/IP) network models are discussed. Covers each network layer in detail, starting from the Physical layer to the Application layer, and includes an overview of network security topics. Other topics covered include encoding digital and analog signals, transmission media, protocols, circuit, packet, message, switching techniques, internetworking devices, topologies, LANs/WANs, Ethernet, IP, TCP, UDP, and web applications. Labs on network analysis. Restrictions: May not be taken in conjunction with CS 425 or CS 625. Only one of these courses can be counted toward degree requirements. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Twelve-week course (May 20-August 5)

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Analysis of Algorithms

MET CS 566

Prereq: (MET CS 248) and (CS341 or CS342) or instructor's consent. Discusses basic methods for designing and analyzing efficient algorithms emphasizing methods useful in practice. Topics include sorting, searching, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, advanced data structures, graph algorithms (shortest path, spanning trees, tree traversals), matrix operations, string matching, and NP completeness. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Twelve-week course (May 21-August 6)

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Enterprise Systems Using SAP

MET CS 567

Introduces the technical and business fundamentals of enterprise systems, enterprise system architecture, the design of enterprise systems, and the complex process of implementing enterprise systems. This course offers methodologies and hands-on techniques for a successful implementation of enterprise systems in organizations. In the first part of the course, participants configure an SAP ERP system to support the main business processes for a fictitious company. In the second part of the course, students review and discuss literature pertinent to the implementation and management of enterprise systems. This course enables students to identify both high-level technical implementation requirements, and organizational/employee resistors to information systems implementation. Through a variety of technological and Human Resources/Organizational Development technologies, we provide a comprehensive understanding of the technical and behavioral do's and don'ts of managing enterprise system implementation. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Twelve-week course (May 22-August 7)

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Operating Systems

MET CS 575

Prereq: (MET CS 472) and (CS 231 or CS 232) or instructor's consent. Overview of operating system characteristics, design objectives, and structures. Topics include concurrent processes, coordination of asynchronous events, file systems, resource sharing, memory management, security, scheduling, and deadlock problems. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Twelve-week course (May 20-August 5)

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Database Management

MET CS 579

Prereq: (MET CS 231 or MET CS 232) or consent of instructor. Provides a theoretical yet modern presentation of database topics ranging from Data and Object Modeling to advanced topics such as using C++/Java to develop web-based database applications. Other topics include relational data model, SQL and manipulating relational data; applications programming for relational databases; physical characteristics of databases; achieving performance and reliability with database systems; object-oriented and distributed information systems. Restrictions: May not be taken in conjunction with CS 669 or CS 469 (undergraduate). Only one of these courses can be counted towards degree requirements. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Twelve-week course (May 22-August 7)

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Health Informatics

MET CS 580

Prereq: (MET CS 570) or instructor's consent. Presents the fundamental principles, concepts, and technological elements that make up the building blocks of Health Informatics. The first part of the course covers the basic concepts, background disciplines, and history overview of health informatics. It also introduces the knowledge hierarchy, healthcare terminology, and clinical data types. The second part introduces healthcare processes, hospital functions, medical algorithms, clinical decision making, and clinical process modeling. The final part covers standards used in health informatics, knowledge management systems, and hospital informatics systems. The course has a term project providing students an experience in design and research related to medical algorithms and clinical decision making. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Web Application Development

MET CS 601

Prereq: For CIS students: (MET CS 200) or instructor's consent. For CS and TC students: (MET CS 231 or MET CS 232) or instructor's consent. Focuses on building core competencies in web design and development. Begins with a complete immersion into HTML, essentially XHTML and Dynamic HTML (DHTML). Students are exposed to Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), as well as Dynamic CSS. The fundamentals of JavaScript language including object-oriented JavaScript are covered comprehensively. AJAX with XML and JSON are covered, as they are the primary means to transfer data from client and server. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

This course can be taken either on campus (section C1) or as an eLive offering (section EL). The C1 section meets on the main campus every Tuesday throughout the twelve weeks. The EL section meets on the main campus on five Tuesdays and online during the intervening weeks.

Twelve-week course (May 20-August 5)

Complete a Graduate Certificate in One Summer

Metropolitan College Department of Computer Science is offering students the opportunity to complete a four course graduate certificate in Information Technology over one 12 week summer session.

The Graduate Certificate in Information Technology requires completion of MET CS625, CS669, CS682, and CS782.

More information about this certificate can be found in our Summer Highlights section.

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Business Data Communication and Networks

MET CS 625

eLive Offering. Prereq: (MET CS 200) or instructor's consent. Presents the foundations of data communications and takes a bottom-up approach to computer networks. Concludes with an overview of basic network security and management concepts. Restrictions: MS CIS only. May not be taken in conjunction with CS 425 (undergraduate) or CS 535. Only one of these courses can be counted towards degree requirements. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 20-June 27)

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Information Technology Project Management

MET CS 632

Provides students with a comprehensive overview of the principles, processes, and practices of software project management. Students learn techniques for planning, organizing, scheduling, and controlling software projects. Substantial focus on software cost estimation and software risk management. Students obtain practical project management skills and competencies related to the definition of a software project, establishment of project communications, managing project changes and managing distributed software teams and projects. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

This course can be taken either on campus (section C1) or as an eLive offering (section EL). The C1 section meets on campus every Tuesday throughout the twelve weeks. The EL section meets on campus on five Tuesdays and online during the intervening weeks.

Twelve-week course (May 20-August 5)

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Computer Language Theory

MET CS 662

Prereq: (MET CS 566) or instructor's consent. Theory of finite automata and regular expressions and properties of regular sets. Context-free grammars, context-free languages, and pushdown automata. Turing machines, undecidability problems, and the Chomsky hierarchy. Introduction to computational complexity theory and the study of NP-complete problems. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Twelve-week course (May 20-August 5)

Class meets at 100 Apollo Drive, Chelmsford, MA.

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Enterprise Java

MET CS 667

Prereq: MET CS 565 or instructor's consent. The Java Enterprise Edition (Java EE) architecture is explored starting with the presentation layer which includes the servlets and Java Server Pages (JSP). Java Server Faces (JSF) are briefly covered. The business layer is examined using the enterprise java beans (EJB). The persistence layer is studied through the Java Persistence API (JPA) and the Hibernate framework. Jave based web services are explored using JAX-WS (SOAP based) and JAX-RS (REST based) APIs. The Spring framework is compared as an alternative architecture. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Database Design and Implementation for Business

MET CS 669

Studies the latest relational and object-relational tools and techniques for persistent data and object modeling and management. Students gain extensive hands-on experience using Oracle or Microsoft SQL Server as they learn the Structured Query Language (SQL) and design and implement databases. Students design and implement a database system as a term project. Restrictions: Only for MS CIS. This course may not be taken in conjunction with CS 469 (undergraduate) or CS 579. Only one of these courses can be counted toward degree requirements. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

This course can be taken either on campus (section C1) or as an eLive offering (section EL). The C1 section meets on campus every Wednesday throughout the twelve weeks. The EL section meets on campus on five Wednesdays and online during the intervening weeks.

Twelve-week course (May 21-August 6)

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Information Systems Analysis and Design

MET CS 682

Prereq: Basic programming knowledge or instructor's consent. Object-oriented methods of information systems analysis and design for organizations with data-processing needs. System feasibility; requirements analysis; database utilization; Unified Modeling Language; software system architecture, design, and implementation, management; project control; and systems-level testing. Laboratory course. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

This course can be taken either on campus (section C1) or as an eLive offering (section EL). The C1 section meets on campus every Thursday throughout the twelve weeks. The EL section meets on campus on five Thursdays and online during the intervening weeks.

Twelve-week course (May 22-August 7)

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Network Security

MET CS 690

Prereq: (MET CS 535 or MET CS 625) or instructor's consent. Covers advanced network security issues and solutions. Main focus on the first part of the course is on Security basics, i.e. security services, access controls, vulnerabilities, threats and risk, network architectures and attacks. In the second part of the course, particular focus and emphasis is given to network security capabilities and mechanisms (Access Control on wire-line and wireless networks), IPsec, Firewalls, Deep Packet Inspection and Transport security. The final portion of the course addresses Network Application security (Email, Ad-hoc, XML/SAML) and Services Oriented Architecture security. As part of our course review we explore a number of Network Use Cases. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Twelve-week course (May 20-August 5)

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Digital Forensics and Investigations

MET CS 693

Provides a comprehensive understanding of digital forensics and investigation tools and techniques. Laboratory and hands-on assignments either in solo or in teams. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

This course can be taken either on campus (section C1) or as an eLive offering (section EL). The C1 section meets on the main campus every Tuesday throughout the twelve weeks. The EL section meets on the main campus on five Tuesdays and online during the intervening weeks.

Twelve-week course (May 20-August 5)

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Enterprise Information Security

MET CS 695

Prereq: (MET CS 625) or instructor's consent. Provides an in-depth presentation of security issues in computer systems, networks, and applications. Formal security models are presented and illustrated on operating system security aspects, more specifically memory protection, access control and authentication, file system security, backup and recovery management, and intrusion and virus protection mechanisms. Application level security focuses on language level security and various security policies including conventional and public keys encryption, authentication, message digest, and digital signatures. Internet and intranet topics include security in IP, routers, proxy servers, and firewalls, application-level gateways, web servers, and file and mail servers. Discussion of remote access issues, such as dial-up servers, modems, and VPN gateways and clients. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Twelve-week course (May 19-August 4)

Twelve-week course (May 19-August 4)

The main campus course can be taken either on campus (section C1) or as an eLive offering (section EL). The C1 section meets on campus every Monday throughout the twelve weeks. The EL section meets on campus on five Mondays and online during the intervening weeks.

The W3 section of this class meets at 100 Apollo Drive, Chelmsford, MA.

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Cloud Computing

MET CS 755

Cloud computing leverages the World Wide Web to fulfill computing needs. It packages applications, computing power, and storage as a metered service similar to a utility. The model is designed to supplant the traditional mechanism of desktop computing. This course covers the origin, theory, enabling technology, and hands-on labs for key concepts in cloud computing. Students: (1) Learn the unique set of problems and challenges in developing cloud computing applications; (2) Learn the platform, tools, technology, and processes for developing cloud computing applications using Hadoop as the main example; and (3) Propose, develop, and run applications for the platforms covered. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Twelve-week course (May 22-August 7)

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Advanced Health Informatics

MET CS 781

Prereq: (MET CS 580) or instructor's consent. Presents the details of health care data and information, health care information systems (HCIS), and the management of information technology (IT) challenges. The first part of the course introduces health care data, information, regulations, laws, and standards related to health care information. The second part covers the history of HCISs, the technologies behind it, the details of HCIS acquisition, development, implementation and support, and HCIS standards and security issues. The last part starts with an introduction to the roles, responsibilities, and functions of the IT staff and services in health care environment, followed by topics on organizing IT services and staff, the development of IT strategic plans, and IT budgeting. A serial of case studies are used to demonstrate the application of the concepts and theories taught in the course. The course has a term project providing students a hands-on experience in HCIS design and research. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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IT Strategy and Management

MET CS 782

Provides an overview of contemporary IT management. Explains the relevant issues of effectively managing information services. Highlights areas of greatest current and potential application of IT to business needs and reviews electronic business, enterprise business systems, and decision support systems. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

This course can be taken either on campus (section C1) or as an eLive offering (section EL). The C1 section meets on campus every Monday throughout the twelve weeks. The EL section meets on campus on five Mondays and online during the intervening weeks.

Twelve-week course (May 19-August 4)

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Enterprise Architecture

MET CS 783

Grad Prereq: (MET CS 682) or strategic IT experience or instructor's consent. Builds upon the strong technical foundation of our MSCIS and MSCS curricula, by providing students with the CIO-level management perspective and skills of enterprise architecture, in the context of the technologies that implement those architectures. Students learn that enterprise architectures are best developed incrementally, by system development projects that are architected to conform to and become part of the overall enterprise architecture. Online content therefore includes many real enterprise system development case studies, showing how these enterprise systems contributed to and helped define the overall enterprise architecture. Also includes a number of realistic enterprise architecture assignments and an incremental term project with components spanning the course, to provide students with hands-on enterprise architecture experience. Provides students with the understanding and skills needed to define and implement successful enterprise architectures that provide real value to organizations. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Twelve-week course (May 22-August 7)

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Criminal Justice

Corrections: Concepts, Systems, and Issues

MET CJ 271

Provides an overview of models of punishment and rehabilitation from the perspectives of the humanities and social sciences, including a review of correctional practices and procedures, institutional treatment, probation, parole, prison conditions, programs for juveniles, and comparative systems. Correction administration topics are covered including personnel, legal, operating practices, overcrowding, and planning. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Courts, Society & Criminal Procedure

MET CJ 352

Prereq: (MET CJ 351) or consent of instructor. Federal, state, and local criminal courts and their relationship to contemporary social and political issues. Historical background of the current criminal court system. Institutional functions of the courts. Role of the courts in reducing crime. Judicial process and criminal procedure, case studies and court decisions. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Special Topics in Criminal Justice

MET CJ 510

Topic for Summer 2014: Special Populations in Corrections. There are several million prisoners in this country, and within this population there are many who present significant and complex challenges to correctional administrators - so called "special populations." Due to correctional agencies playing a primary role in mental health services in American today, the largest and most important group includes people possessing various mental illnesses. Other groups include sex offenders, people with chronic health illnesses, and gang members. This course examines the history of managing special populations, with a primary focus on the mentally ill. Through interactive lectures, discussions, facility tours, and presentations from current practitioners, students explore the impact of social trends, philosophy, and resultant laws and policies on the marginalization of some of the most challenging yet vulnerable offenders. Students consider what types of policies and practices might lead to more effectively managing and treating these populations and decreasing the burden on the correctional system and society. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Policing in a Democratic Society

MET CJ 750

Police agencies play a critical role in a democratic society. While seeking to maintain order, enforce the law and deliver services effectively, police agencies are held accountable to a wide-variety of values by a number of powerful stakeholders. Police leaders, managers, and other personnel must understand the complexities of the police role in society, the political and legal constraints placed on them in addition to being experts in effective, evidence-based approaches to dealing with crime problems in the community. By applying theory, policy, and evaluation literature to the cutting-edge practices in the field, this course provides students with an advanced understanding in the field of police leadership, management, strategy, and accountability within a democratic society. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Criminal Justice Administration

MET CJ 831

Complex bureaucratic organizations are central to the administration of justice in modern society. The effectiveness of policies, strategies, and programs designed to address crime depend largely on successful agency implementation of these new approaches. At the same time, accountability concerns (i.e. abuse of authority, excessive force, prison misconduct) are best understood as organizational outcomes connected to the administrative practices of criminal justice agencies. With an aim toward understanding how to improve the effectiveness and accountability of agencies, the course examines the ways in which criminal justice system organizations work. Drawing on organization theory and literature, the course discusses organization structure; leadership, management, and supervision processes; interagency collaboration; organizational learning; and socialization and culture within criminal justice organizations. The course further examines the role of the complex environment in which criminal justice operates, emphasizing the relationship between criminal justice agencies and the public and political and legal authorities. Throughout the course and working with local agencies, we use case studies to apply these concepts to contemporary challenges and controversies within criminal justice. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Distance Education/Online

Note: Distance Education/Online Courses may not be taken for credit by Boston University students toward any CAS, CGS, GRS, or SMG degree. MET EN 240 is not open to students enrolled in the Metropolitan College Online Undergraduate Degree Completion Program.

The Sounds of Poetry

MET EN 240

Online offering. This course is based on the idea that the art of poetry, like speech itself, is both intellectual and physical: vocal, though not necessarily performative. The Favorite Poem Project, founded by Robert Pinsky, is dedicated to celebrating, documenting and encouraging poetry's role in Americans' lives. Through watching the FPP videos, reading the accompanying anthology, An Invitation to Poetry, as well as Professor Pinsky's guide, The Sounds of Poetry, students gain a better understanding of poetry, hear more of what is happening in poems, and are able to better articulate the ways in which words can have an effect on a speaker/listener/reader. Students write weekly responses to poems and videos, watch poetry lectures by distinguished contemporary poets, and compile their own personal poetry anthologies. The course culminates in a presentation of a Favorite Poem video as well as a discussion with Robert Pinsky about the Favorite Poem Project and all things poetry. For further information, please call the Office of Distance Education at 617-358-1960. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400; technology fee: $240; total charge: $2640

Summer 2 (June 30-August 8)

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Earth Sciences

Special Topics

MET ES 141

Topic for Summer 2014: Investigation on Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay. Examines the flora and fauna of the Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay ecosystems on the beach, at the shore, in the Harbor Islands, and on the waters of Boston Harbor and Mass Bay. With 50 miles of protected water, four sheltered bays, seven river systems, dozens of islands, and a nine-foot average tide, Boston Harbor is one of the most diverse urban ecosystems in America. Students keep daily records of their experiences, record and analyze data for a research paper, and learn to use GIS Datalayers, species maps, and field work guides. Intensive four-week course. Students in this course will incur additional field-trip related expenses. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 2 (July 11-August 8)

Read a BU Today article about this course: One Class, One Day: Understanding Boston Harbor.

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Gastronomy

Special Topics in Gastronomy

MET ML 609

Topic for 2014: A History of Distilled Spirits. The sudden renaissance of distilled spirits has captured the public imagination and artisan craftspeople have overcome remarkable legal and logistic hurdles. But this is nothing new. This course traces the origin of distillates from the Middle Ages to the present, recounting the technical details of manufacture, transport and marketing; social attitudes toward alcohol; and the religious, medical and cultural manifestations of drinking practices. Hands-on workshops and tastings round out the lectures with particular focus on brandy, scotch, rum, tequila, bourbon, vodka, absinthe, shochu and other drinks around the world and how they are mixed into cocktails. 2 cr. Tuition: $1560

Summer 1 (June 5-June 14)

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Special Topics in Gastronomy

MET ML 610

Topic for 2014: The Science of Food and Cooking. Cooking is chemistry and it is the chemistry of food that determines the outcome of culinary undertakings. In this course, basic chemical properties of food are explored in the context of modern and traditional cooking techniques. The impact of molecular changes resulting from preparation, cooking, and storage is the focus of academic inquiry. Illustrative, culturally specific culinary techniques are explored through the lens of food science and the food processing industry. Examination of “chemistry-in-the-pan” and sensory analysis techniques will be the focus of hands-on, in-class and assigned cooking labs. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Special Topics in Gastronomy

MET ML 610

Topic for 2014: Wild and Foraged Foods. Humans have been foraging for food since prehistoric times but the recent interest in wild and foraged foods raises interesting issues about our connection to nature amid the panorama of industrially oriented food systems. From political economy to Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) this course explores how we interact with, perceive, and know our world through the procurement of food. Students take part in foraging activities and hands-on culinary labs in order to engage the senses in thinking about the connections between humans, food, and the environment. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Special Topics in Gastronomy

MET ML 610

Topic for 2014: Food Values: Local to Global Food Policy, Practice, and Performance. Reviews various competing and sometimes conflicting frameworks for assessing what are “good” foods. Examines what global, national, state, and local food policies can do to promote the production and consumption of these foods. Participants learn how to conceptualize, measure, and assess varying ecological, economic, nutritional, health, cultural, political, and justice claims. We analyze pathways connecting production and consumption of particular foodstuffs in the U.S. and the world. Emphasis is on comparative food systems and food value chains, and the respective institutional roles of science and technology, policy, and advocacy in shaping food supply and demand. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Special Topics in Gastronomy

MET ML 610

Topic for 2014: Approaches to Feeding Children. Even as a new food culture has arisen, one that is devoted to fresh, local, and authentic foods, we are still offering our children highly processed foods having little nutritional value. Indeed, children are besieged with cultural messages of all kinds, often contradictory, in regard to food. By looking at how families all along the economic spectrum provide for their children, this course deciphers the cultural meanings behind the foods children are being fed. Students will do research on such topics as childhood nutrition, school lunches, edible schoolyards, and farm-to-school practices. Food stamps, SNAP, junk food, fast food, and advertising to children will also be discussed. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Fundamentals of Wine

MET ML 651

Suitable for students without previous knowledge of wine, this introductory survey explores the world of wine through lectures, tastings, and assigned readings. By the end of the course, students will be able to exhibit fundamental knowledge of the principal categories of wine, including major grape varieties, wine styles, and regions; correctly taste and classify wine attributes; understand general principles of food and wine pairing; and comprehend the process of grape growing and winemaking. 2 cr. Tuition: $1560; lab fee: $150; total charge: $1710

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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A Comprehensive Survey of Wine

MET ML 652

An intensive survey course designed for the avid consumer and serious student of wine. Offering detailed knowledge of wine through tastings, lectures, and assigned readings, the course is also useful for those who wish to enter the wine trade, or those already in the industry who want to hone their knowledge. By the end of the course, students will be able to exhibit detailed knowledge of wine regions, grape varieties, and styles; demonstrate refined tasting ability; and understand inherent characteristics of wine. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120; lab fee: $250; total charge: $3370

Twelve-week course (May 20-August 5)

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Nutrition and Diet: Why What You Eat Matters

MET ML 691

Introduces major concepts in nutrition and diet to students of food studies and other disciplines who have limited or no background in the biological sciences. The overarching goal is to develop a working understanding of the basic science of nutrition and apply this knowledge to personal health and professional settings. The course begins with the fundamentals of nutrition and diet, focusing on macro- and micronutrient intakes and needs throughout the life course. Food-based nutrition is discussed, alongside dietary guidelines, recommendations, and food labels. Moving from the individual level to the larger public health arena, we also examine such topics as nutritional ecology, influences on dietary intakes, overnutrition, and undernutrition. A running theme throughout will be critiquing how diet and nutrition are treated in the media and press. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Laboratory in the Culinary Arts: Cooking

MET ML 698

Exposes students to a craft-based understanding of the culinary arts from which to better understand how food and cuisine fit into the liberal arts and other disciplines and cultures. Integrates personal experience and theory through discipline by training students in the classic and modern techniques and theories of food production, through cooking and working efficiently, effectively, and safely. Also introduces students to foods of various cultures and cuisines from around the world. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120; lab fee: $1500; total charge: $4620

Summer 2 (June 30-August 5)

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Laboratory in the Culinary Arts: Baking

MET ML 699

Exposes students to a craft-based understanding of the culinary arts from which to better understand how food and cuisine fit into the liberal arts and other disciplines and cultures. Integrates personal experience and theory through discipline by training students in the classic and modern techniques and theories of food production, through pastry and baking methods and working efficiently, effectively, and safely. Also introduces students to baking techniques from various cultures and cuisines from around the world. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120; lab fee: $1500; total charge: $4620

Summer 2 (July 2-August 7)

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Urban Agriculture

MET ML 714

Growing food in urban contexts raises interesting questions about food access, nutrition education, perceptions of public spaces, and the place of nature in the urban environment. This course focuses on urban agriculture in Boston and a number of case studies from around the globe. Students visit gardens, learn basic cultivation skills through hands-on activities, and study the social and cultural sides of urban agriculture, as well as the political and city planning aspects of urban agriculture projects. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

Read a BU Today article about this course: One Class, One Day: Urban Agriculture Takes Root.

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Psychology

Counseling and Motivational Interviewing

MET PS 275

Prereq: MET PS 101 or consent of instructor. Basic theories of counseling and motivational interviewing are compared and contrasted. Emphasis is placed on investigating the various contexts in which these theories and techniques are particularly applicable (e.g., sports psychology, weight loss, smoking cessation, crises management, etc.). 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Leadership in the Workplace

MET PS 330

Prereq: (MET PS 101). Studies the interplay between psychology, leadership, and workplace dynamics within organizations. Focuses on the practical as well as the applied and theoretical aspects of organization psychology. Investigates actual work related case studies and leadership and work related issues, as well as the dynamic nature of the field. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Special Topics in Psychology

MET PS 501

Topic for Summer 2014: The Psychology of Adult Life. This course covers the ways psychologists view adulthood, life events, and transitions. We investigate the role of contexts and identity (including culture, gender, and cohort), as well as rites of passage. Topics include work and career development, cognition and learning, relationships, making meaning, dealing with trauma and stress, the aging process, and end of life experiences. Research studies, biographies, documentaries, and student-conducted interviews provide material through which we investigate themes and variations of adulthood. This course is useful for people planning careers in counseling/clinical psychology and human services, as well as those with an interest in exploring and understanding the experiences, phases, transitions, and challenges in adulthood. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Sociology

Sexuality and Social Life

MET SO 240

Explores patterns of human sexual behavior and attitudes with a focus on contemporary urban society in the United States. Examines theories of human sexuality that aid in the interpretation of empirical research on sexual behavior. Special emphasis on how gender, race, social class, and sexualities intersect. Special consideration of contemporary social issues such as online dating and hook-up culture, cybersex, "new" orientations such as polyamory and asexual identity, and the public health and policy implications of commercial sex and sex crimes. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Violence in the Family

MET SO 305

Explores American family violence across the life span including child abuse, teen dating violence, wife battering, and elder abuse. Physical, emotional, and sexual abuse is examined. Considers how family violence differs by class and ethnic group and its differential impact on women. Institutional responses to family violence in the legal, medical, and social service systems are included as well as the role played by the women's shelter movement. Ideological supports for family violence in gender expectations, religious teaching, and the media are also studied. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Special Topics in Sociology

MET SO 501

Topic for Summer 2014: A Social History of Boston's North End. A socio-cultural history of Boston's North End that surveys changes in the region from the colonial period to the present. Centers on the dynamics of culture change among North End's Italian immigrants. Examines the causes of immigration conflicts and competition with Irish immigrants; the importance of religious societies and festivals as an expression of anticlerical Catholicism; kinship and regional factors in residential distribution; the context, content, and influence of W.F. Whyte's Street Corner Society; myths and realities of the Boston Mafia; the impact of drugs and drug related youth violence in the 1980s; and the changes brought about through gentrification, demographic change, and economic stratification. Also examines the re-creation of the North End as an Italian style neighborhood through studies of tourism, the marketing of ethnic cuisine and lifestyle, and research on ethnic theme parks. Course includes 2 visits to the North End. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400; additional fee: $100; total charge: $2500

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Understanding Moral Panics

MET SO 511

Introduces students to the concept of Moral Panics. Moral panics are a social phenomenon triggered by an incident or series of incidents that appear to threaten a society's culture or way of life. Policymakers, legislators, and prosecutors react to these fears despite a trivial or non-existent threat. In this course we analyze in detail five moral panics to advance our understanding of the theoretical framework and the media's role in their construction. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Urban Affairs

History and Theory of Urban Planning

MET UA 515

History, concepts, methods, and debates of contemporary urban and regional planning practice. Governmental, nonprofit, and private settings of professional planning; plans, research, and policy development; uses and implementation of planning. Political analysis of planning issues, such as comprehensiveness, public interest, advocacy, negotiation, and future orientation. Case materials drawn from redevelopment, growth management, land use conflicts, and service delivery. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Boston Experience

MET UA 580

Topic for Summer 2014: The Role of Architecture in Creating a Sense of Place. An introduction to the formal study of architecture. Introduces the concept that the role of architecture is to develop and maintain a sense of place. Establishes why and how a 'sense of place' is important to humans for social and psychological reasons and is also important to societies for economic, political, and health and recreational reasons. The city of Boston serves as a living laboratory for this introductory study of architecture. Using this laboratory, students work on issues of historic preservation, upkeep, repair, restoration, improvement, modification, removal, adaptive renewal, and new construction as these processes relate to the importance of a sense of place. 4 cr. Tuition: $2400

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Designing Urban Space

MET UA 613

The role of urban design in the community development process. Examines human behavior, aesthetic foundations of design methods, citizen/client participation, and public policy issues. Analysis of actual community spaces. Student design exercises. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Urbanization and the Environment

MET UA 629

Interrelationships between physical environment and processes of urbanization. Case studies develop historical perspective on social, economic, and physical aspects of the quality of urban life. Special attention to the preparation of environmental impact statements and assessment of urban environmental quality. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Urban Problems and Policy Responses

MET UA 701

Major problems confronting urban areas and the process of policy formulation and implementation. Emphasis on problem interdependence and systems characteristics. Analysis of problem definitions (housing, crime, poverty), goals, public/private responsibilities, existing programs, and policy options. Analysis of selected comparative international experiences. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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