Writing

Courses in: Writing Seminar (098) | Writing Seminar (100)

College of Arts & Sciences

Please note: CAS WR 100 B2 is full.

Writing Seminar (098)

Academic Writing for ESL Students 2

CAS WR 098

Prereq: (CAS WR 097) or placement test results. Emphasis on critical reading and analytical writing in response to various theme-based texts. Review of grammar and mechanics in context. Intensive practice in the patterns of academic argumentation through multiple writing assignments of increasing complexity. Refinement of speaking skills through discussions and oral presentations. 4 cr. Tuition: $2560

Summer 2 (July 5-August 11)

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Writing Seminar (100)

Imaginative engagement through reading and writing with a theme or topic in literature, thought, and society. Emphasis on assimilation of challenging readings into essays that are clear, accurate, persuasive, and engaging. Practice in classroom discussion of ideas and refinement of speaking skills. Special attention to comparison and synthesis. Individual conferences.

Writing Seminar

CAS WR 100

Topic: Boston in Film and Literature. Beantown. The Hub. The Athens of America. Whatever its moniker, Boston has captivated writers and artists for centuries. In this seminar, we look at Boston as subject and setting of a number of very different works in order to understand the social, political, historical, and artistic forces that have shaped this great American city. Texts include the fiction of Nick Flynn and Dennis Lehane, the poetry of Robert Lowell and Elizabeth Bishop, and the films of Clint Eastwood and Martin Scorsese. This section is reserved for non-native English speakers. 4 cr. Tuition: $2560

Summer 2 (July 5-August 11)

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Writing Seminar

CAS WR 100

Topic: Heroes and Villains in American Business. Authors, journalists and filmmakers never seem quite sure what to do with business people. At times, American writers have held up business professionals as cultural heroes. At other points in U.S. history, though, business and business people have been cast as forces that threaten some of the nation’s most cherished values. Why does business seem to occupy a central, but uncertain, place in American culture? In this class, we take an interdisciplinary approach to this question by examining a range of business heroes and villains in American culture. We will read works by authors including Ida Tarbell, Ayn Rand, and Upton Sinclair, as well as examine more recent cultural artifacts about business, such as movies and television shows. Throughout, we consider these texts alongside recent scholarship about the history of American capitalism to consider the ways in which wider cultural, political, and social changes have shaped how Americans view the world of business. 4 cr. Tuition: $2560

Summer 2 (July 5-August 11)

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