Writing

College of Arts & Sciences

For classes in Creative Writing see additional listings under Creative Writing.

College of Arts & Sciences Writing Program

The purpose of the CAS Writing Program is to help students read challenging works with critical discernment, to write with a refined sense of style, and to speak with appropriate eloquence. Although the topics of the seminars differ, all seminars are designed to foster lively discussions about works of literature that serve as models for effective writing. Every writing seminar teaches grammatical correctness and stylistic versatility. All seminars lead students through a common assignment sequence that stresses the process of revision. Students enrolled in the College of Arts & Sciences are required to complete two courses of formal instruction in writing, reading, research, and speaking. The two-course sequence CAS WR 100 and WR 150 is the usual means of satisfying this requirement. WR 097 (not offered in summer) and WR 098 are reserved for ESL (English as a Second Language) students whose score on the ESL Writing Placement Test indicates a need for preparatory work prior to enrolling in WR 100-150.

Tutorial assistance is available to students enrolled in summer composition courses. To make an appointment with a tutor, please go to http://www.bu.edu/writingprogram/the-writing-center/ or call 617-358-1500.

Writing Seminar (100)

Imaginative engagement through reading and writing with a theme or topic in literature, thought, and society. Emphasis on assimilation of challenging readings into essays that are clear, accurate, persuasive, and engaging. Practice in classroom discussion of ideas and refinement of speaking skills. Special attention to comparison and synthesis. Individual conferences.

Writing Seminar

CAS WR 100

Topic: Ethical Missteps in Public Health. This course addresses the contemporary relevance of selected ethics issues that have arisen in the public health arena over the last 100 years. Topics include theories about the biology of race and “fitness” in the Progressive Era; the U.S. Public Health Service’s 40-year Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis; and the American eugenics movement, which culminated in the Supreme Court decision in Buck v. Bell. Students read firsthand accounts by public health practitioners and policymakers at the time, as well as more recent scholarship that seeks to make reasoned “trans-historical moral judgments” about past wrongs. 4 cr. Tuition: $2640

Summer 2 (July 3-August 10)

Top

Writing Seminar

CAS WR 100

Topic: Revisiting Fairy Tales. Students in this course read multiple versions of several fairy tales, examining themes of violence, adolescence, and maturation, side by side with critical essays by scholars working from anthropological, literary-critical, and psychological viewpoints. The course engages students with issues including oral vs print transmission and the significance of the continual revisioning of tales, as well as the meanings of recurring motifs such as the monstrous bride/groom. Authors examined include the Brothers Grimm, Charles Perrault, Nalo Hopkinson, Anne Sexton, and Angela Carter, among others. This section is reserved for non-native English speakers. 4 cr. Tuition: $2640

Summer 2 (July 3-August 10)

Top