Writing

Courses in: Writing Seminar (098) | Writing Seminar (100)

College of Arts & Sciences

For classes in Creative Writing see additional listings under English.

College of Arts & Sciences Writing Program

The purpose of the CAS Writing Program is to help students read challenging works with critical discernment, to write with a refined sense of style, and to speak with appropriate eloquence. Although the topics of the seminars differ, all seminars are designed to foster lively discussions about works of literature that serve as models for effective writing. Every writing seminar teaches grammatical correctness and stylistic versatility. All seminars lead students through a common assignment sequence that stresses the process of revision. Students enrolled in the College of Arts & Sciences are required to complete two courses of formal instruction in writing, reading, research, and speaking. The two-course sequence CAS WR 100 and WR 150 is the usual means of satisfying this requirement. WR 097 (not offered in summer) and WR 098 are reserved for ESL (English as a Second Language) students whose score on the ESL Writing Placement Test indicates a need for preparatory work prior to enrolling in WR 100-150.

Tutorial assistance is available to students enrolled in summer composition courses. To make an appointment with a tutor, please go to http://www.bu.edu/writingprogram/the-writing-center/ or call 617-358-1500.

Writing Seminar (098)

Academic Writing for ESL Students 2

CAS WR 098

Prereq: (CAS WR 097) or placement test results. Emphasis on critical reading and analytical writing in response to various theme-based texts. Review of grammar and mechanics in context. Intensive practice in the patterns of academic argumentation through multiple writing assignments of increasing complexity. Refinement of speaking skills through discussions and oral presentations. 4 cr. Tuition: $2480

Summer 2 (June 29-August 6)

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Writing Seminar (100)

PLEASE NOTE: CAS WR 100 B2 is currently full. Imaginative engagement through reading and writing with a theme or topic in literature, thought, and society. Emphasis on assimilation of challenging readings into essays that are clear, accurate, persuasive, and engaging. Practice in classroom discussion of ideas and refinement of speaking skills. Special attention to comparison and synthesis. Individual conferences.

Writing Seminar

CAS WR 100

Topic: Elements of Danger in American Short Fiction. The danger tale may be the oldest narrative form. It serves as a warning, an entertainment, a history, and a means by which to challenge social norms. Sometimes, it performs these functions simultaneously. The central task of this course is to explore the idea of danger. In one story, characters may risk embarrassment. In another, they may risk their lives. Are the stakes the same within the stories’ contexts? Can a story of manners be as compelling as a violent drama? Over the millennia, danger narratives have developed and refined their structures and mechanisms for delivering their messages. Can these systems remain effective, even if readers recognize and categorize the devices? The course will principally focus on American short fiction, but may also explore poetry, non-fiction, art, and film to test theories about form and content. Authors include Ernest Hemingway, Shirley Jackson, Bharati Mukherjee, Chuck Palahniuk, and Stephen King, among others. 4 cr. Tuition: $2480

Summer 2 (June 29-August 6)

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Writing Seminar

CAS WR 100

Topic: Boston in Film and Literature. This course looks at Boston as the subject and setting of a number of works across genres. Texts include the fiction of Nick Flynn and Dennis Lehane; the poetry of Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, and Robert Lowell; and the films of Clint Eastwood, Ben Affleck, and Martin Scorsese. This section is reserved for non-native English speakers. 4 cr. Tuition: $2480

Summer 2 (June 29-August 6)

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