Gastronomy

Metropolitan College

The following courses are electives within the Master in Liberal Arts in Gastronomy and the Food Studies Certificate. They are also open to non-degree students who have completed an undergraduate degree.

The Science of Food and Cooking

MET ML 619

Cooking is chemistry, and it is the chemistry of food that determines the outcome of culinary undertakings. In this course, basic chemical properties of food are explored in the context of modern and traditional cooking techniques. The impact of molecular changes resulting from preparation, cooking, and storage is the focus of academic inquiry. Illustrative, culturally specific culinary techniques are explored through the lens of food science and the food processing industry. Examination of "chemistry-in- the-pan" and sensory analysis techniques will be the focus of hands-on in- class and assigned cooking labs. 4 cr. Tuition: $3200

Summer 1 (May 20-June 24)

Top

Wild and Foraged Foods

MET ML 625

Humans have been foraging for food since prehistoric times, but the recent interest in wild and foraged foods raises interesting issues about our connection to nature amid the panorama of industrially oriented food systems. From political economy to Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK), this course explores how we interact with, perceive, and know our world through the procurement of food. Students take part in foraging activities and hands-on culinary labs in order to engage the senses in thinking about the connections between humans, food, and the environment. 4 cr. Tuition: $3200

Summer 1 (May 19-June 25)

Top

Anthropology of Food

MET ML 641

What can food tell us about human culture and social organization? Food offers us many opportunities to explore the ways in which humans go about their daily lives from breaking bread at the family table to haggling over the price of meat at the market to worrying about having enough to eat. Food can also tell us about larger social organizations and global interconnections through products like Spam that are traded around the globe and the ways in which a fruit like the tomato transformed the culinary culture of European nations. In this course we consider how the Anthropology of Food has developed as a subfield of cultural anthropology. We also look at the various methodologies and theoretical frameworks used by anthropologists to study food and culture. 4 cr. Tuition: $3200

Summer 1 (May 20-June 24)

Top

The Foundation of Beer and Spirits

MET ML 650

Explores the great variety of beer styles and spirit categories currently available and the role each plays in our culture. Surveys significant developments in the historical evolution, production, distribution, consumption, and cultural usage of these alcohol beverages in the United States. Includes tastings of beer and spirts to demonstrate examples of the most important categories and classifications. 2 cr. Tuition: $1600

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

Top

Fundamentals of Wine

MET ML 651

Suitable for students without previous knowledge of wine, this introductory survey explores the world of wine through lectures, tastings, and assigned readings. By the end of the course, students will be able to exhibit fundamental knowledge of the principal categories of wine, including major grape varieties, wine styles, and regions; correctly taste and classify wine attributes; understand general principles of food and wine pairing; and comprehend the process of grape growing and winemaking. 2 cr. Tuition: $1600; lab fee: $150; total charge: $1750

Ten-Week Course (June1-August 3)

Top

A Comprehensive Survey of Wine

MET ML 652

An intensive survey course designed for the avid consumer and serious student of wine. Offering detailed knowledge of wine through tastings, lectures, and assigned readings, the course is also useful for those who wish to enter the wine trade, or those already in the industry who want to hone their knowledge. By the end of the course, students will be able to exhibit detailed knowledge of wine regions, and grape varieties and styles; demonstrate refined tasting ability; and understand inherent characteristics of wine. 4 cr. Tuition: $3200; lab fee: $250; total charge: $3450

Twelve-week course (May 19-August 4)

Top

Nutrition and Diet: Why What You Eat Matters

MET ML 691

Introduces major concepts in nutrition and diet to students of food studies and other disciplines who have limited or no background in the biological sciences. The overarching goal is to develop a working understanding of the basic science of nutrition and apply this knowledge to personal health and professional settings. Begins with the fundamentals of nutrition and diet, focusing on macro- and micronutrient intakes and needs throughout the life course. Discusses food-based nutrition along with dietary guidelines, recommendations, and food labels. Moving from the individual level to the larger public health arena, the course also examines such topics as nutritional ecology, influences on dietary intakes, overnutrition, and undernutrition. A running theme throughout is critiquing how diet and nutrition are treated in the media and press. 4 cr. Tuition: $3200

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

Top

Laboratory in the Culinary Arts: Cooking

MET ML 698

Exposes students to a craft-based understanding of the culinary arts from which to better understand how food and cuisine fit into the liberal arts and other disciplines and cultures. Integrates personal experience and theory through discipline by training students in classic and modern techniques and theories of food production, through cooking and working efficiently, effectively, and safely. Also introduces students to foods of various cultures and cuisines from around the world. 4 cr. Tuition: $3200; lab fee: $1500; total charge: $4700

Summer 2 (June 29-August 4)

Top

Laboratory in the Culinary Arts: Baking

MET ML 699

Exposes students to a craft-based understanding of the culinary arts from which to better understand how food and cuisine fit into the liberal arts and other disciplines and cultures. Integrates personal experience and theory through discipline by training students in classic and modern techniques and theories of food production, through pastry and baking methods and working efficiently, effectively, and safely. Also introduces students to baking techniques from various cultures and cuisines from around the world. 4 cr. Tuition: $3200; lab fee: $1500; total charge: $4700

Summer 2 (July 1-August 6)

Top

Food Values: Local to Global Food Policy, Practice, and Performance

MET ML 719

Reviews various competing and sometimes conflicting frameworks for assessing what are "good" foods. Examines what global, national, state, and local food policies can do to promote the production and consumption of these foods. Participants learn how to conceptualize, measure, and assess varying ecological, economic, nutritional, health, cultural, political, and justice claims. Students analyze pathways connecting production and consumption of particular foodstuffs in the U.S. and the world. Emphasis is on comparative food systems and food value chains, and the respective institutional roles of science and technology, policy, and advocacy in shaping food supply and demand. 4 cr. Tuition: $3200

Summer 2 (June 29-August 5)

Top

Courses of Related Interest