Gastronomy

Metropolitan College

The following courses are electives within the Master in Liberal Arts in Gastronomy and the Food Studies Certificate. They are also open to non-degree students who have completed an undergraduate degree.

Special Topics in Gastronomy

MET ML 609

Topic for 2014: A History of Distilled Spirits. The sudden renaissance of distilled spirits has captured the public imagination and artisan craftspeople have overcome remarkable legal and logistic hurdles. But this is nothing new. This course traces the origin of distillates from the Middle Ages to the present, recounting the technical details of manufacture, transport and marketing; social attitudes toward alcohol; and the religious, medical and cultural manifestations of drinking practices. Hands-on workshops and tastings round out the lectures with particular focus on brandy, scotch, rum, tequila, bourbon, vodka, absinthe, shochu and other drinks around the world and how they are mixed into cocktails. 2 cr. Tuition: $1560

Summer 1 (June 5-June 14)

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Special Topics in Gastronomy

MET ML 610

Topic for 2014: The Science of Food and Cooking. Cooking is chemistry and it is the chemistry of food that determines the outcome of culinary undertakings. In this course, basic chemical properties of food are explored in the context of modern and traditional cooking techniques. The impact of molecular changes resulting from preparation, cooking, and storage is the focus of academic inquiry. Illustrative, culturally specific culinary techniques are explored through the lens of food science and the food processing industry. Examination of “chemistry-in-the-pan” and sensory analysis techniques will be the focus of hands-on, in-class and assigned cooking labs. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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Special Topics in Gastronomy

MET ML 610

Topic for 2014: Wild and Foraged Foods. Humans have been foraging for food since prehistoric times but the recent interest in wild and foraged foods raises interesting issues about our connection to nature amid the panorama of industrially oriented food systems. From political economy to Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) this course explores how we interact with, perceive, and know our world through the procurement of food. Students take part in foraging activities and hands-on culinary labs in order to engage the senses in thinking about the connections between humans, food, and the environment. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 1 (May 20-June 26)

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Special Topics in Gastronomy

MET ML 610

Topic for 2014: Food Values: Local to Global Food Policy, Practice, and Performance. Reviews various competing and sometimes conflicting frameworks for assessing what are “good” foods. Examines what global, national, state, and local food policies can do to promote the production and consumption of these foods. Participants learn how to conceptualize, measure, and assess varying ecological, economic, nutritional, health, cultural, political, and justice claims. We analyze pathways connecting production and consumption of particular foodstuffs in the U.S. and the world. Emphasis is on comparative food systems and food value chains, and the respective institutional roles of science and technology, policy, and advocacy in shaping food supply and demand. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Special Topics in Gastronomy

MET ML 610

Topic for 2014: Approaches to Feeding Children. Even as a new food culture has arisen, one that is devoted to fresh, local, and authentic foods, we are still offering our children highly processed foods having little nutritional value. Indeed, children are besieged with cultural messages of all kinds, often contradictory, in regard to food. By looking at how families all along the economic spectrum provide for their children, this course deciphers the cultural meanings behind the foods children are being fed. Students will do research on such topics as childhood nutrition, school lunches, edible schoolyards, and farm-to-school practices. Food stamps, SNAP, junk food, fast food, and advertising to children will also be discussed. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Fundamentals of Wine

MET ML 651

Suitable for students without previous knowledge of wine, this introductory survey explores the world of wine through lectures, tastings, and assigned readings. By the end of the course, students will be able to exhibit fundamental knowledge of the principal categories of wine, including major grape varieties, wine styles, and regions; correctly taste and classify wine attributes; understand general principles of food and wine pairing; and comprehend the process of grape growing and winemaking. 2 cr. Tuition: $1560; lab fee: $150; total charge: $1710

Summer 1 (May 21-June 25)

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A Comprehensive Survey of Wine

MET ML 652

An intensive survey course designed for the avid consumer and serious student of wine. Offering detailed knowledge of wine through tastings, lectures, and assigned readings, the course is also useful for those who wish to enter the wine trade, or those already in the industry who want to hone their knowledge. By the end of the course, students will be able to exhibit detailed knowledge of wine regions, grape varieties, and styles; demonstrate refined tasting ability; and understand inherent characteristics of wine. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120; lab fee: $250; total charge: $3370

Twelve-week course (May 20-August 5)

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Nutrition and Diet: Why What You Eat Matters

MET ML 691

Introduces major concepts in nutrition and diet to students of food studies and other disciplines who have limited or no background in the biological sciences. The overarching goal is to develop a working understanding of the basic science of nutrition and apply this knowledge to personal health and professional settings. The course begins with the fundamentals of nutrition and diet, focusing on macro- and micronutrient intakes and needs throughout the life course. Food-based nutrition is discussed, alongside dietary guidelines, recommendations, and food labels. Moving from the individual level to the larger public health arena, we also examine such topics as nutritional ecology, influences on dietary intakes, overnutrition, and undernutrition. A running theme throughout will be critiquing how diet and nutrition are treated in the media and press. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

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Laboratory in the Culinary Arts: Cooking

MET ML 698

Exposes students to a craft-based understanding of the culinary arts from which to better understand how food and cuisine fit into the liberal arts and other disciplines and cultures. Integrates personal experience and theory through discipline by training students in the classic and modern techniques and theories of food production, through cooking and working efficiently, effectively, and safely. Also introduces students to foods of various cultures and cuisines from around the world. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120; lab fee: $1500; total charge: $4620

Summer 2 (June 30-August 5)

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Laboratory in the Culinary Arts: Baking

MET ML 699

Exposes students to a craft-based understanding of the culinary arts from which to better understand how food and cuisine fit into the liberal arts and other disciplines and cultures. Integrates personal experience and theory through discipline by training students in the classic and modern techniques and theories of food production, through pastry and baking methods and working efficiently, effectively, and safely. Also introduces students to baking techniques from various cultures and cuisines from around the world. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120; lab fee: $1500; total charge: $4620

Summer 2 (July 2-August 7)

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Urban Agriculture

MET ML 714

Growing food in urban contexts raises interesting questions about food access, nutrition education, perceptions of public spaces, and the place of nature in the urban environment. This course focuses on urban agriculture in Boston and a number of case studies from around the globe. Students visit gardens, learn basic cultivation skills through hands-on activities, and study the social and cultural sides of urban agriculture, as well as the political and city planning aspects of urban agriculture projects. 4 cr. Tuition: $3120

Summer 2 (June 30-August 6)

Read a BU Today article about this course: One Class, One Day: Urban Agriculture Takes Root.

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