Gastronomy

Metropolitan College

The following courses are electives within the Master in Liberal Arts in Gastronomy graduate program and the Food Studies Graduate Certificate. They are also open to non-degree students who have completed an undergraduate degree.

Culture and Cuisine: New England

MET ML 638

How are the foodways of New England's inhabitants, past and present, intertwined with the history and culture of this region? In this course, students have the opportunity to examine the cultural uses and meanings of foods and foodways in New England using historical, archaeological, oral, and material evidence. We focus on key cultural, religious, and political movements that have affected foodways in the region, as well as the movement of people. 4 cr. Tuition: $3520

Summer 2 (July 2-August 8)

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Anthropology of Food

MET ML 641

What can food tell us about human culture and social organization? Food offers us many opportunities to explore the ways in which humans go about their daily lives, from breaking bread at the family table to haggling over the price of meat at the market to worrying about having enough to eat. Food can also tell us about larger social organizations and global interconnections through products like Spam that are traded around the globe and the ways in which a fruit like the tomato transformed the culinary culture of European nations. In this course we consider how the anthropology of food has developed as a subfield of cultural anthropology. We also look at the various methodologies and theoretical frameworks used by anthropologists to study food and culture. 4 cr. Tuition: $3520

Summer 1 (May 22-June 26)

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Fundamentals of Wine

MET ML 651

Suitable for students without previous knowledge of wine, this introductory survey explores the world of wine through lectures, tastings, and assigned readings. By the end of the course, students will be able to exhibit fundamental knowledge of the principal categories of wine, including major grape varieties, wine styles, and regions; correctly taste and classify wine attributes; understand general principles of food and wine pairing; and comprehend the process of grape growing and winemaking. 2 cr. Tuition: $1760; lab fee: $200; total charge: $1960

WINE GLASSES: Students are required to purchase wine glasses, which are available for purchase for $20 on the first day of class. You may pay cash, check, or credit card to your instructor.

Summer 1 (May 21-June 18)

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Survey of Food and Film

MET ML 673

We can all take pleasure in eating good food, but what about watching other people eat or cook food? This course surveys the history of food in film. It pays particular attention to how food and foodways are depicted as expressions of culture, politics, and group or personal identity. We will watch a significant number of films, both fiction and non-fiction, classic and modern. A good portion of class time will also be given to discussing the readings in combination with hands-on, in-depth analysis of the films themselves. 4 cr. Tuition: $3520

Summer 1 (May 22-June 26)

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Special Topics

MET ML 702

Prereq: a passing grade or higher in Level 2, or a grade of B- or higher in MET ML 652. Topic for Summer 2019: Grapevine Varieties and their Varietal Wine. This survey course provides advanced wine students with a thorough knowledge of the wine world's principal grape vine varieties and their respective varietal wines. Students will learn about their history and their role in the market. Class wine tastings will illustrate diverse examples of varietal wines -- exploring the impact of geographic, clonal, viticultural and enological factors on varietal wine expression. 4 cr. Tuition: $3520; lab fee: $200; total charge: $3720

WINE GLASSES: Students are required to purchase wine glasses, which are available for purchase for $20 on the first day of class. You may pay cash, check, or credit card to your instructor.

Summer 2 (July 2-August 8)

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Agricultural History

MET ML 713

This course surveys the history of American agriculture from the colonial era to the present. It examines how farmers understood markets, made crop choices, adopted new technologies, developed political identities, and sought government assistance. Emphasis is on the environmental, ideological, and institutional impact of farm modernization and industrialization. 4 cr. Tuition: $3520

Summer 2 (July 1-August 7)

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Urban Agriculture

MET ML 714

Growing food in urban contexts raises interesting questions about food access, nutrition education, perceptions of public spaces, and the place of nature in the urban environment. This course focuses on urban agriculture in Boston and a number of case studies from around the globe. Students visit gardens, learn basic cultivation skills through hands-on activities, and study the social and cultural sides of urban agriculture, as well as the political and city planning aspects of urban agriculture projects. 4 cr. Tuition: $3520

Summer 1 (May 21-June 27)

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