Arts Administration

Note: Course details for Summer 2019 will be available on December 15. The courses below were offered in Summer 2018 and can serve as a guide to what is typically offered.

Metropolitan College

Capital Campaigns

MET AR 711

This course is designed to broaden the student's understanding of capital campaign fundraising. Topics include: feasibility studies; strategic planning and budgeting; private and public phases; ethical responsibilities; staff, donor, volunteer, board, and trustee management; major gift solicitation; campaign communications; trend analysis; and evaluation. The course curriculum includes readings, case studies, guest speakers, and analysis of current capital campaign projects. 4 cr.

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Comparative Cultural Policy and Administration

MET AR 777

Prereq: (MET AR 690). Drawing on the resources of Boston University in Boston, London, and Dublin, this course examines the nature of cultural policy in the United States, United Kingdom, Ireland, and the European Union from 1945 to the present. Through lectures and readings (drawn from public policy and economics), lectures by leading arts administration faculty members in Dublin and London, and visits to important international cultural venues, this course examines the impact of cultural and national differences on the cultural policy making process. Meets on the Boston University Charles River campus prior to a week in Dublin and London. 4 cr.

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Special Topics in Arts Administration

MET AR 781

Topic for Summer 2018: The Creative Economy and Creative Placemaking. This course examines the origins and development of the concept of the creative economy and the roles that individuals, businesses, nonprofits, and the public sector play in stimulating local economies and forming clusters of distinct economic activity. We consider the various lenses through which the notion of creative economy has been viewed within the U.S. and abroad, and review the debates that have arisen concerning its perceived positive and negative effects, including those of revitalization, gentrification, and displacement; as well as issues of cultural identity, appropriation, and commodification. With culture and creativity placed in relation to geographic space, the creative economy movement has in turn led to the concept of creative placemaking, in which policy intervention seeks to animate local communities and bridge sectors. Using a case study approach, we will examine specific examples of creative placemaking intervention to consider promising practices for weaving culture and community. 4 cr.

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Special Topics in Arts Administration

MET AR 781

Topic for Summer 2018: The Modern Nonprofit Sector. This course examines the nonprofit sector from the perspective of its key stakeholders: nonprofit leaders and their funders. Students have the opportunity to explore the complex relationships between these partners, and begin to unravel their internal decision-making processes as they seek common ground among funding priorities, constituent needs, and programming challenges. Because nonprofit funding opportunities rely so heavily on relationship building, partnerships, and politics, much of this course focuses on understanding the dynamics and perspective each partner brings to the conversation and identifying methods to achieve success for both parties. Key topics of study include nonprofit approaches to grant writing, especially balancing programmatic and operational needs, grant review, and due diligence. The course includes panel discussions with nonprofit leaders and funders in the community, an inside look at grant writing, and application review. Students analyze flaws in the nonprofit sector’s infrastructure and discover and study innovative ways to solve them. 4 cr.

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Internship in Arts Administration I

MET AR 802

The purpose of this course is to provide guidance in identifying, securing, and preparing for your internship experience. There will be three class meetings which operate basically on a seminar model. Students will have the opportunity to discuss their plans and concerns as they begin the process of identifying an internship site and applying for internships. Class sessions will also include specific instructions on preparation of resumes, job-hunting techniques, effective presentation, and the like. There are also two Saturday morning workshops, one devoted to resume preparation (required) and one on making effective presentations (optional but strongly recommended). Arts Administration degree students only. 2 cr.

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Internship in Arts Administration II

MET AR 803

The purpose of this course is to provide guidance as you go through your internship experience, helping you to ensure that you gain career insights as well as specific job skills. There will be three class meetings which operate basically on a seminar model. Students will have the opportunity to share their experiences and "lessons learned" with their classmates, and to provide advice and guidance to students who are in the planning stages of their own internships. Class sessions will also include specific instructions on preparation of resumes, job-hunting techniques, effective presentation, and the like. There are also two Saturday morning workshops, one devoted to resume preparation (optional, if you have already attended this workshop when you took AR802, Internship1) and one on making effective presentations (optional but strongly recommended). Students may not register for MET AR 803, or begin their actual internship until they have completed a minimum of six of the ten required courses. Arts Administration degree students only. 2 cr.

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