Technology

Library Classroom

Public Computers

We have over 20 computers available for public use at the Theology Library, including 7 near the front of the library and 16 in the Library Instruction Room (209, off the library Reading Room). Most computers require a BU log-in; two are reserved in the front of the library for visitor access.

Three of our computers have BibleWorks installed (see our tutorials to get started!) Most computers in the library can print using BU IS&T’s MyPrint system (see below for more information).

Scanning

Self-service flatbed scanners are available free of charge at the School of Theology Library to all library visitors. Materials can be scanned into 5MB PDF, text-searchable PDF, JPEG, and Word file formats. The scanners are halfway down the main hallway of the library on the left. Using our scanners, you are able to:

Send scanned material to your email address
Save scanned material on a USB drive
Upload scanned material to Google Drive
Save scanned material to your iPhone or iPad

All document scanning is subject to U.S. Copyright Law.

Printing

All the computers in the School of Theology Library are connected to BU IS&T’s MyPrint system, allowing BU students, faculty, and staff to print documents from our computers using their printing allocation, which is updated each semester. The School of Theology Library has a MyPrint printer located by the scanners. Most of our public computers are connected to the MyPrint system; simply click “print” on a document and choose the printer “MyPrintBW” for black and white printing or “MyPrintColor” for color printing. Note: You cannot use your free sheets to print in color. You can print in color only by purchasing and using Convenience Points on the StudentLink.

The BU MyPrint printers are self-releasing. To release a print job, go to any printer on BU’s campus (including the one by the scanners in the STH Library) and scan your BU ID (or type in your BU username and password). Select the document you wish to print on the touchscreen, and it will begin printing immediately.

You can set up your personal computer to print to any MyPrint printer, including the one at the School of Theology Library. Consult BU IS&T’s step-by-step guide on setting up your computer to print to the MyPrint printer or consult the guide available here and at the School of Theology Library circulation desk!

If you exceed your print sheet allocation for the semester, you can still print using BU Convenience Points, which can be purchased on the StudentLink.

Setting up Wi-Fi

All Boston University students, faculty, and staff can access Wi-Fi by simply connecting to BU (802.1x) with your wireless enabled device and entering your BU username and password.

As a visitor, you can also access Wi-Fi on your wireless enabled device. Connect to network BU Guest (unencrypted). After attempting to navigate to any website on your browser, you will be redirected to a page where you set up a guest account. Click on “Request a Guest Account” and fill out the information. Note you will need access to your email (by using, for example, one of our public access computers) or receive SMS text messages on your cell phone. You will be sent a username and password to use to sign in that is good for 30 days. You can repeat the same process over again at the end of the 30 days. BU IS&T has provided an online tutorial for the process.

Copyright Law

As mentioned above, the copyright law of the United States (Title 17 of the United States Code) governs the scanning, photocopying, and other reproductions of copyright material. When you scan something at the School of Theology Library, you are agreeing to abide by this law.

Copyright Law is designed to protect the rights of the creator of a work. The doctrine of fair use of an original work tends to apply in libraries. If you are interested in learning more about the concept of copyrighted works and the fair use for educational purposes of that work, the American Library Association has a good summary. To quote from the ALA article:

Fair use is a copyright principle based on the idea that the public is entitled to freely use portions of copyrighted works for educational and informational purposes. Under fair use, someone other than the copyright holder may freely copy, display, perform, and distribute copyrighted material, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research.

If you have any questions, click here or email us at sthref@bu.edu.

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