By Christopher Broadwell

Micah and Jocelyn in Peru!

October 18th, 2013 in Alumni/ae News

Here’s a link to a recent newsletter from Notre Dame Mission Volunteers that contains an update from our alumni and friends, Micah and Jocelyn. They are currently serving in Peru, teaching English at two different high schools and serving in the local mission. What an exciting journey they are taking.

Micah and Jocelyn in NDMV

Jeff Lane (STH ’10)

October 2nd, 2013 in Alumni/ae Publications

Jeff Lane (STH ’10) has shared his recent publication with us: The Samaritan Project (Beacon Hill Press of Kansas City)

The Samaritan Project takes the familiar parable of an injured traveler and invites the reader to engage the story in a way that will change how they view themselves and the people in their world. Learn the importance of story, discover the revealing nature of questions and explore the distance we have created between ourselves and those God has called us to love.

[The authors] incite the reader to action as they wrestle with what it means to see, love and be a neighbor. Whether one reads this alone or in community, the questions and experiential projects throughout each chapter will provide practical ways to serve.
Through The Samaritan Project, the reader will re-imagine what it looks like to embody the compassion of a neighbor.

http://www.nph.com/nphweb/html/bhol/itempage.jsp?itemId=9780834128392&catalogId=BHOL&catSecCd=LOSR&subCatSecCd=NA&subSubCatSecCd=NA&lid=dsc

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Joas Adiprasetya (STH ’09)

October 2nd, 2013 in Alumni/ae Publications

An Imaginative Glimpse: The Trinity and Multiple Religious Participations is the newest publication from Joas Adiprasetya. Joas Adiprasetya is the President of Jakarta Theological Seminary, Indonesia, where he also teaches systematic theology and theology of religions. Here’s the book’s description:

“In contrast to the popular notion that the doctrine of the Trinity hinders Christians from engaging with the reality of religious diversity, this book argues that the doctrine is the best way of constructing contemporary theology of religions. An Imaginative Glimpse reexamines three prominent Trinitarian theologians of religions (Raimundo Panikkar, Gavin D’Costa, and S. Mark Heim) and proposes a fresh and creative model by bringing the classical idea of perichoresis to its present-day multifaith situation. Opening a new alternative in both Trinitarian theology and theology of religions, Adiprasetya’s approach adds a distinctive contribution to the ongoing and challenging discussion in both fields. By using perichoresis imaginatively as a multidimensional category for multiple religious participations within the Trinity, Adiprasetya argues that the model is able to respect all religions on their own terms, while at the same time being faithful to the Christian standpoint.”

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Dr. Donald F. Megnin (STH ’60)

October 2nd, 2013 in Alumni/ae Publications

Since his retirement as a professor of International Politics, Donald F. Megnin (STH ’60) has been writing books of personal and historical interest and finds this activity most satisfying in his retirement years.

Dr. Megnin books in order of publication are: The Security of SilenceA Conspiracy of SilenceThe Struggle to SurviveA Farm Boy Sees The WorldMoments in Time: A MemoirA Medley of Short StoriesGlimpses of the Past: Letters From Overseas, andQuestions We Need To Ask Ourselves. Dr. Megnin is currently writing a book on jokes and funny stories.

He writes of his experience at Boston University School of Theology:

“My class was 1960 and I had worked for Dean Howard Thurman during my last two years in Seminary. I set up the Children’s Chapel Program for Marsh Chapel so that the children could attend church school while their parents attended the adult Marsh Chapel service.

During my first year in Seminary, I worked for the Waltham Methodist Church under the direction of the Rev. Ernest Case. Having sold my car to attend the first Cultural Exchange Program between the United States and the Soviet Union (Summer of 1958), I was no longer able to travel any distance to serve in a local church. Fortunately, I was able to borrow cars to present my program on Our Soviet Union visit among the churches in Massachusetts served by various classmates and graduate students with whom I had become acquainted in seminary.”

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