Guide to Field Education

Document last updated 4.29.2014

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BUSSW MISSION STATEMENT

THE MSW PROGRAM

THE GOAL OF FIELD EDUCATION

A GUIDE TO THIS GUIDE

AN OVERVIEW OF FIELD EDUCATION

Required Hours

Schedule

Integrative Field Seminar

Specializations, Certificates, and Dual Degree Programs

THE SCHOOL ROLE IN FIELD EDUCATION

Agency Selection

The Placement Process

Faculty Advising

Employer Agency Placements

Problem Resolution

Status Review

THE AGENCY ROLE IN FIELD EDUCATION

Field Instructors

Expectations of Agencies

THE STUDENT IN THE AGENCY

Hours and Sick Leave

Vacations

Disclosure of Student or Trainee Status

CORI Check

Health Information

EDUCATIONAL ELEMENTS OF THE FIELD PLACEMENT

Supervision

The Learning Contract between the Field Instructor and Student

Recordings as a Learning/Teaching Tool

Assignments

Field Education Portfolio

Evaluation and Feedback

Grade for Field Education

Values and Ethics

Legal Issues

PLACEMENT SCHEDULE OPTIONS

Standard Concurrent

Summer Block

Modified Block

Twelve-Month Extended Placement

Additional Comments

FIELD EDUCATION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

Behavioral Standards for Social Work Students

Sexual Harassment Policy and Procedures

Definition of Sexual Harassment

Examples of Conduct Which May Constitute Sexual Harassment

Boston University School of Social Work Sexual Harassment Procedure

Sexual Harassment and Field Education

Procedures

Drug and Alcohol Policy

Safety Policy and Procedures

Responsibilities and Roles

Procedures for Reporting an Incident

Safety Tips for Students in the Field

Students with Disabilities

Professional Liability Coverage for Students

FIELD EDUCATION COMPETENCIES

The Urban Mission in Field Education

Foundation Competencies

Advanced Competencies

Advanced Clinical Competencies

Advanced Macro Competencies

BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

MISSION STATEMENT

 

 

 

The Boston University School of Social Work is dedicated to improving the lives of individuals, families, communities, and organizations within the urban environment. Subscribing to the priorities of the profession of social work, the School of Social Work has adopted the following mission:

 

 

“The Boston University School of Social Work (BUSSW) is committed to education which furthers social and economic justice in the urban environment and strives to incorporate this commitment into its programs and activities. The School is especially concerned with empowerment of all oppressed groups. BUSSW recognizes the ever-changing demands on the profession and strives to meet them through the highest quality of teaching, scholarship, research, practice, and political action.

BUSSW’s aim is to educate professional social workers who will become leaders in a complex, diverse, and multicultural society. They will possess the knowledge and the skills to address the needs and potentials of individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. The School offers an integrated program of study, including clinical and macro social work methods. It emphasizes the engagement of personal and community strengths as fundamental to the understanding, treatment, and prevention of individual and social problems.”

THE MSW PROGRAM

 

 

The School is committed to educating social workers who have excellent skills and practice within an ecological framework and social change context. Boston University School of Social Work graduates work not merely as “therapists,” “organizers,” or “planners,” but as professionals who are open to and ready for innovation and change, and possess the knowledge and skills required to meet the needs of individuals, groups, families, communities, and organizations.

The MSW degree is offered in both full-time and part-time programs. Part–time programs are available at the Charles River (Boston) campus, in northeastern Massachusetts, at two locations in southeastern Massachusetts, and online. Students who have earned a BSW from an accredited undergraduate program and who meet other criteria may be admitted to the Advanced Standing program, a one-year program of study leading to the MSW.

THE GOAL OF FIELD EDUCATION

The goal of field education is to prepare students for competence in social work practice. Through field education, students translate theoretical concepts and principles and research evidence into practice, applying these to work with individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations. The specific competencies for field education are described in the Guide to Field Education here.

A GUIDE TO THIS GUIDE

The Guide to Field Education is designed to:

  1. Identify the roles and responsibilities of the School, the agency, the field instructor, and the student in the field education experience;
  2. Outline Field Education policies and procedures;
  3. Identify foundation competencies to be acquired by all students; and
  4. Identify the advanced competencies to be developed by students in each of the social work concentrations offered (Clinical or Macro).

AN OVERVIEW OF FIELD EDUCATION

Foundation (first placement) students are assigned to settings that enable them to acquire a broad understanding of the field of social work, to recognize and use generalist principles and concepts, and to select intervention methods to meet individual, group, family, and community needs based on a careful and comprehensive assessment. While students in foundation placements will focus primarily in either clinical or macro practice, they should have exposure to all methods of practice within the parameters of the agency’s services. Advanced (second placement) students are assigned to field agencies that foster development of advanced competence in the student’s social work method concentration (clinical or macro practice).

Field Education is done concurrently with practice method courses, so that the field experience can be integrated with classroom learning.

Required Hours

The foundation placement is 480 hours and the advanced placement is 720 hours. The placement for advanced standing students is 1,000 hours.
While geographic considerations are factored into placement assignments, students can expect to travel up to an hour each way to get to and from the agency.

Schedule

Typically, foundation placements are on Thursday and Friday and advanced placements are on Monday, Tuesday, and Friday during normal business hours. In some cases, students arrange alternative schedules that can include evenings or blocks of time on different days.  See Placement Options for a more detailed description of schedule options. Any alternative schedule must meet with agency approval and cannot conflict with the student’s class schedule. Students should be at the agency when they can participate in the “life of the agency,” e.g., staff meetings, case conferences, and inservice training. Most placements run from mid-September through early May. Some school settings may require students to extend their placements until the middle or end of June and follow a different schedule from that of the School of Social Work.

Integrative Field Seminar

Students in foundation placements attend an Integrative Field Seminar designed to support the field placement experience. The seminar for on-campus students meets periodically during the foundation placement year. The seminars for off-campus and online students are scheduled throughout the program. Topics covered in the seminar include: the learning contract, recordings/analyses, and evaluation as learning tools; the supervisory relationship; ethical issues in practice; and working in culturally diverse settings and communities, etc.

Specializations, Certificates, and Dual Degree Programs

When students choose one of the specialization or certificate programs offered at the School (Clinical Practice with a Macro sub-specialization, Clinical Social Work and Behavioral Medicine, Family Therapy, Group Work, Gerontological Social Work, Human Service Management, Trauma), their advanced placement will need to meet specific criteria. The same may be true of students in the dual degree programs.

THE SCHOOL ROLE IN FIELD EDUCATION

Agency Selection

The Field Education Department is affiliated with many nonprofit and public agencies in Massachusetts and throughout New England. In keeping with the School’s urban mission, many agencies are located in urban communities. Agency availability for student internships is constantly changing in response to a number of factors, including funding, community needs and priorities, and staffing.  As a result, some placements may not be available for internships in a given year.

  • The Field Education Department is continually developing new placements to match student interest and need, new curriculum priorities and new directions in practice.  Agencies are approved for placements by the Field Education Department based on the agency’s ability to meet the School’s criteria and other considerations.
  • Recommendations from students for new field placement sites are always welcome.  Students who are interested in field placements in agencies with which the School is not currently affiliated should discuss their interest with a member of the Field Education staff before contacting the agency.

The Placement Process

The Field Education Department is responsible for arranging the field placements of all students. Students should not contact an agency directly without approval from the Field Education Department. Similarly, agencies that are interested in requesting the placement of a particular student should contact the Field Education Department. Such requests from agencies are given careful consideration and are met whenever feasible.

Incoming Students:  The placement process for incoming full-time students occurs during the spring and summer months prior to enrollment in the program. Placements are made based on a review of the following information by the Field Education staff:

  1. Student’s Admissions Application—Primary factors include past experience, future career goals, and interests.
  2. Student Placement Form—A form completed by the student indicating field interests and career goals.
  3. Student Résumé
  4. Agency Placement Form—Information from each agency indicating the number and year of students the agency can accommodate, specific characteristics of students who would benefit most within that setting, programs and clients/consumers served, and potential student assignments, location, and transportation accessibility.

Each student will have an in-person telephone or electronic interview with a member of the Field Education staff before an assignment to a specific agency is made.

Students are encouraged to share with the Field Education Department any information which might be important in making a field placement assignment. The Field Education Department assumes that this information may be shared with prospective agencies unless the student indicates otherwise. Routinely, the Field Education Department sends a copy of the student’s resume to prospective field placements.

Placement assignment is confirmed only after the student has been interviewed by the prospective agency. In most cases, this occurs over the summer before school begins in September.

Continuing Students: Continuing part-time students entering the foundation placement complete the Placement Form in an Advising Seminar and then meet individually with a Field Education staff member to identify a specific placement.

For continuing students entering the advanced (second) placement, the process begins in the December session of the Integrative Field Seminar with a description of the placement process and discussion of professional goals and agency settings. Simultaneously, students and their advisors meet to complete an education assessment and develop an agency profile. Students then meet individually with a member of the Field Education Department staff to identify possible agency options.

Continuing students will interview with agency personnel after the Field Education Department has assigned them to a placement. The assignment will be confirmed after the student and agency personnel met together. Prior to the start of the advanced placement, a copy of the student’s final foundation field evaluation is sent to the new agency.

Placement Reassignment: If at any time after the student has started the placement, the agency or student raises questions about the viability of the placement, the situation is reviewed by the Field Education staff and the parties involved. In some situations, a Problem Resolution Meeting may be convened to facilitate the decision-making process. In some circumstances, a decision is made to replace the student in a different setting. When a field placement is changed, the student may need to extend the placement beyond the normal ending date to accommodate the agency’s need and/or to develop required field education competencies.

Faculty Advising

Students and agency field instructors often have questions about the role of the advisor.  We hope the following information will be helpful to you and that you will feel free to call upon the advisor for help in any of the areas outlined below.

Advisors at the Boston University School of Social Work are either members of the full- or half-time faculty and administration or are hired to serve as adjunct advisors on a part-time basis. Their responsibilities include the following:

  1. Academic Advising
    1. Provides advice about course selection and sequencing, primary method choice, specializations, certificate and dual degree programs, and career  options;
    2. Serves as a resource when a learning problem develops or is identified; convenes problem resolution meetings when necessary and gathers information on the student’s performance in classes and field as part of that process;
    3. Serves as a reference for students applying to dual degree or certificate programs.
  2. Field Liaison (for students in field placement)
      1. Serves as a liaison between School and agency;
      2. Consults with the student and field instructor (agency supervisor) about assignments, learning contract, evaluation, etc.;
      3. Serves as the student’s advocate in ensuring that the School’s expectations of the agency are being met and that the student is meeting the agency’s requirements;
      4. Serves as a troubleshooter, problem-solver and mediator in the event that a problem in the field placement is identified;
      5. Visits the agency at least once each semester to meet with the student and field instructor(s) to assess progress toward goals;
      6. Works with the student in planning for advanced year placement;
      7. Recommends grade for Field Education course.
      1. General Resource
        1. Can serve as sounding board, referral source, and general support regarding personal problems or life issues that arise while the student is in school, e.g. health, family, financial, housing, workload, etc.

      Students will hear from their advisors during the first few weeks of school. Advisors will also be in touch with the field instructor during this time to make sure that the field experience is progressing as it should. Each student meets individually with his/her advisor during the early part of the semester to assess how his/her program is progressing and to address the student’s beginning questions or concerns.

      If you have any questions about or problems with your field placement, these should be discussed with your advisor before they are brought to the Field Education Department. If a problem or question arises before your advisor has contacted you, you should feel free to contact your advisor immediately.

      We look forward to an exciting year at the School, and encourage you to take full advantage of the many wonderful learning opportunities available to you.

      Employer Agency Placements

      The Field Education Department recognizes that some students are employed in agencies which can provide them with excellent learning experiences while they continue their employment at the agency. The employer agency option enables students to do one of their two placements at their employing agency as long as specified conditions are met. An employer agency placement is not a situation in which a student gets credit for work experiences. It is a field placement with an educational focus that happens to be at the student’s place of employment.

      The criteria for employer agency placements are:

      • the agency and field instructor meet the basic requirements for all field placements outlined in the “Criteria for Field Instructors and Agencies.”
      • the field placement time at the agency (16 hours for first [foundation] year and 24 hours for second [advanced] year) is spent in a different department, unit, or program of the agency from the one which the student is employed.
      • the field instructor is someone other than the supervisor to whom the student is accountable for their work assignment.
      • the student assignment is substantively different from the work assignment in terms of client population served, interventions used, and skills developed.

      Agencies wishing to develop employer agency placements for students need to complete an Employer Agency Proposal form.

      All employer agency proposals must be approved by the Field Education Department before the start of the placement.

      Advanced Standing students are not eligible to do employer agency placements.

      Problem Resolution

      1. Definition of a Problem Resolution

      Problem Resolution is a problem-solving and mediation process used when a concern in some part of a student’s education experience has not been resolved directly by the parties involved. A Problem Resolution meeting can be initiated by the faculty advisor, the student, or any other member of the School faculty or administration. If a student believes that s/he has been discriminated against by a faculty member, field instructor, or staff member, s/he can request a Problem Resolution meeting. There is a multi-step process for responding when concerns arise.

      a. Instructor or field instructor and student meet to address the concern. If the concern remains unresolved,

      b. The faculty advisor discusses the concern with the people involved. If the concern remains unresolved,

      c. A Problem Resolution meeting is held. If the concern continues to be unresolved,

      d.Either a follow-up Problem Resolution meeting is held or a request is made to the dean for a Status Review.

      2. Setting Up a Problem Resolution Meeting

      When a Problem Resolution meeting is to be held, a small group of relevant individuals is convened by the appropriate BUSSW administrator or faculty advisor. The group may include the following: the student, the faculty advisor, the field instructor and/or classroom teachers (if directly involved in the problem), and the faculty and administrators considered to have helpful information about the problem under discussion or about the student in general (e.g., Director of Student Services, Field Education, or Part-Time Programs staff). Students may invite someone (often another student) to accompany them to the Problem Resolution meeting. This person’s role is to support the student during and after the meeting and/or to observe the Problem Resolution process; this person does not actively participate in the meeting. The chair will review this person’s role when introducing those present at the meeting and is also available to respond to any questions about the role before the meeting. In the event of an allegation of discrimination, a group of relevant individuals is convened by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The chair of the Problem Resolution meeting or faculty advisor will talk to the student in advance of the meeting to review the purpose of the meeting and to respond to the student’s questions and concerns about the process.

      3. Notice of the Meeting

      A notice of the Problem Resolution meeting is sent to all participants of the meeting and is accompanied by a Problem Statement written by the faculty advisor or chair. The Problem Statement summarizes the problem as presented by the various parties, and an overview of the student’s academic and field history at School. Typically, the student’s classroom instructors are asked to provide feedback about the student’s classroom performance. In a case of alleged discrimination, the documentation is prepared by the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

      4. The Problem Resolution Meeting

      In general, the goals of the meeting include:

      • A clearer understanding of the concerns and the contributing factors;
      • Identification of strategies and steps to ameliorate the situation;
      • Goals to be reached;
      • Who will take responsibility for each specific step;
      • Criteria for assessing the extent to which the concern(s) or issue(s) has been resolved;
      • Dates by which goals are to be met or issue(s) to be reconsidered

      In most cases, the group will agree on the direction to be taken. If there is disagreement about the desired outcome, the following options are available: 1) after additional data or consultation has been obtained, a follow-up problem resolution meeting will be held; or 2) a Status Review hearing will be requested. In cases of alleged discrimination the group may recommend that the matter be brought to the attention of the Dean.

      5. Follow-up

      In situations where the goals and a plan have been established but progress toward identified goals has not been made or new issues emerge, another problem resolution meeting may be convened, or a request for a Status Review may be made to the Dean.

      6. Written Summary of the Meeting

      The faculty advisor or chair of the meeting will write a summary of the meeting, outlining the group’s understanding of the concerns, the goals to be reached, respective responsibility for reaching the goals, the criteria for assessing that the concern has been resolved, and the dates by which goals are to be met. Only those people who have responsibility for implementing or monitoring the resolution of the concerns will receive a copy of the summary.

      7. Confidentiality and Record Keeping

      In order to insure confidentiality in the Problem Resolution process, all written material distributed to meeting participants will be destroyed upon completion of the recommended steps. This information is not shared with others without the student’s knowledge.

      Status Review

       

       

      In a Status Review, a decision is reached concerning the student’s status as a master’s degree candidate. A Status Review will be initiated immediately if the possibility of plagiarism is involved, if a student receives an “F” in a required course, or if it appears that a student is or will be unable to meet the 3.0 GPA requirements in order to graduate. A Status Review may also be initiated immediately (with or without a previous Problem Resolution meeting) with an approved request to the Dean, if a student’s behavior in the classroom, field placement, or in the School’s overall community environment appears to be in serious violation of the BUSSW Behavioral Standards for Social Work Students or the Boston University Code of Student Responsibility.

      In addition, a Status Review may be requested after problem(s) have been identified in the advising process, and after the Problem Resolution process has been exhausted and adequate progress has not been made in resolving the problem(s). Deliberations involving a wider range of people, information, and ideas are then necessary, and the question of the student’s ability to remain in school and function satisfactorily should be considered and answered. At this point the Status Review process shall be initiated.

      Students referred to Status Review cannot continue in the program until a Status Review meeting has been convened and a decision reached by the Committee. Upon written request of the student to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, permission may be granted for the student to continue in current classes or internship pending a decision by the Status Review Committee, subject to such conditions as the Associate Dean may impose.

      1. The Status Review Committee shall consist of four (4) faculty members, one of whom shall serve as Chairperson, and two (2) students appointed by the Dean, one of whom will serve as student representative on the Committee and one who will serve as alternate student representative. In the event that neither of the student representatives is available to participate in the Status Review meeting, the Dean will appoint another student to serve as the representative for this proceeding, or the student may choose to waive student representation at the Status Review meeting. The student representative on the Status Review Committee functions in the same roles as other Committee members, but does not participate in voting. The Chairperson does not have voting rights.

      2. The Committee, acting as a whole, shall have the power to devise and promulgate operational guidelines for its functioning that are consistent with the policies described here.

      3. The student’s faculty advisor, the classroom instructor, or an appropriate administrator is responsible for initiating the Status Review process.

      4. The person initiating the Status Review shall ask the Dean to convene a Status Review process through a written letter/memorandum spelling out problem areas. Thereupon the Dean shall notify the student (through letter mailed “Return Receipt Requested,” unless other arrangements have been discussed) and the Chairperson of the Status Review Committee shall arrange a time for the meeting.

      5. The Chairperson will coordinate the gathering of relevant materials regarding the student’s situation and prepare a written notice with accompanying materials. This notice and materials will be sent to the student in advance of the meeting with copies sent to faculty members and student representatives of the Status Review Committee.

      6. The Status Review Chairperson will arrange to meet individually with the student prior to convening the Status Review meeting to hear the student’s perspective on the problems which prompted the request for the Status Review and to answer any questions he or she should have regarding the process.Upon receiving notice, the student has the following options:

      1. To appear personally before the Committee and participate fully in all deliberations other than decision-making.

      2. To give written notice of his/her intent not to contest the assertions in the Status Review notice to him/her, but to present a request to the Committee asking for a particular outcome.

      3. To waive representation by the student committee member at the Status Review meeting. This decision shall be communicated to the Chairperson of the Committee prior to the meeting.

      4. To bring before the Committee people with additional relevant information on the matters described in the Status Review notice, or who may serve as an emotional support to the student, subject to a decision by the Chairperson that each of these individuals has an appropriate role to play. This request shall be communicated by the student to the Chairperson, with a brief description of the role each person would play and the information each would provide, prior to the meeting. The student may be accompanied by a person of his or her choice to serve as an advisor. This person may be an attorney; however the advisor or attorney is there to advise the student and may not participate directly in the proceedings except with permission of the Chair.

      5. To request the replacement of a Committee member for the student’s Status Review meeting on the grounds that a Committee member is or would be biased. This request shall be made to the Committee Chairperson, prior to the convening of the Status Review meeting, outlining the reasons for the request. The Chair shall rule on the merits of the student’s request.

      6. In the event that the student challenges the Chairperson’s objectivity to lead the proceeding, a request to the Dean to replace the Chairperson for a student’s Status Review meeting must be made prior to the convening of the Status Review meeting, and the Dean shall rule on the merits of the student’s request.

      7. To have communications and documents transmitted electronically (email) in lieu of printed copies. This applies to materials and information to the student and from the student.

      8. All communications, including electronic (email) communications, shall become part of the official meeting record. Any ruling of the Chairperson against the student with respect to the above options shall be a part of the written record.

      9. In no case may the student’s faculty advisor or other person initiating the process be part of the Committee deciding the matter under review. However, they may participate fully in the procedure up to the point of final decision-making.

      10. The Committee and the student shall have in advance of its deliberations sufficient written material to illuminate the student’s situation. This shall consist of the material prepared in the Problem Resolution Process (if held), any supplemental material, and materials which the student chooses to submit, including electronic (email communications.

      11. The Committee shall seek to maximize sharing of information and points of view within its deliberations in order to allow every participant full expression of views, and to consider all possible alternative courses of action. Careful regard will be given to confidentiality outside of the Committee. All members of the Committee will assess the situation from an objective stance on the basis of the information presented.Once the presentation of information and discussion are complete, the Committee members deliberate in private and a final vote is taken. A majority vote will prevail. The decision shall be communicated in writing to the student and the Dean. It is expected that the Committee will arrive at one of three possible decisions:

      a. The student has made satisfactory progress toward the resolution of the problem(s) and is removed from the Status Review process.

      b.The student has not made satisfactory progress but there is a reasonable likelihood he/she can do so, if certain specified steps are taken (including leave of absence).

      c. The student has not demonstrated sufficient progress in meeting the requirements of the MSW program and is withdrawn from the School.

      All decisions of the Committee will be considered final, subject only to the use of the Appeal Process by the student.

      1. The student may appeal the decision of the Status Review Committee but there are only two grounds on which an appeal can be made:
        1. Violation of due process, or
        2. Significant new information pertinent to the student’s situation is available.

      Such an appeal must be made in writing to the Dean no later than one month following Committee’s decision. The Dean shall make all the decisions about an appeal and shall engage in whatever activities are deemed necessary to implement such decisions.

      THE AGENCY ROLE IN FIELD EDUCATION

      Both the agency and the field instructor play critical roles in the professional education of the student.  The School chooses field placement agencies which support the mission of the social work profession and the Boston University School of Social Work through the work they do and the communities they serve.  Similarly, field instructors demonstrate their commitment to the profession’s knowledge, values and skills in their supervision and support of students and their own competent and ethical practice.

      Field Instructors

      The field instructor plays a key role in the professional education of the social work student. The field instructor, who has the closest and most continuous relationship with the student, serves as both a role model and a teacher.

      Field instructors are qualified staff members selected by agency administrators and approved by the School. Students must receive a minimum of two hours each week of formal supervision. One hour each week must be individual supervision provided by the primary MSW field instructor. The second hour may be provided by an approved secondary supervisor and/or may be provided in a group supervision format. All secondary supervisors must be approved by the Field Education Department. Students in extended (12-month) placements are required to have a minimum of 1.5 hours of supervision per week. At least one hour must be individual supervision provided by the primary MSW field instructor.  In addition to time spent with the students, field instructors are expected to read students’ recordings, attend meetings and seminars, and consult with School representatives. All field instructors are invited to participate in other seminars and workshops offered to them by the School. See more about field instructor benefits .

      Many agencies assign a contact person who is responsible for coordinating student placements with the School and for transmitting information between the School and the agency. The contact person may also be a field instructor, although this is not always the case.

      The following are criteria for the selection of field instructors:

      1. Master’s degree from an accredited school of social work (not required for advanced placement Macro students).
      2. Minimum of two years, relevant full-time, supervised post-MSW experience.
      3. LICSW (or equivalent for agencies outside Massachusetts) is preferred for field instructors in advanced clinical placements. An LCSW is required for field instructors who supervise students in foundation placements. Exceptions may apply in some state and municipal agencies.
      4. Sufficient term of employment at the agency to ensure familiarity with agency policies and procedures and availability to meet the student’s needs.
      5. Agreement to act as a field instructor on a continuing basis during the academic year or a full placement period.
      6. Commitment to:
        1. Ensure that two hours of supervision per week are provided. A minimum of one hour of individual supervision per week must be provided by the primary MSW field instructor. A second hour of supervision must be provided to the student and can be given by either the primary field instructor or another qualified professional either individually or in a small group (staff meetings do not qualify as supervision. See supervision requirements for students in extended (12-month) placements. It is the responsibility of the primary field instructor to ensure both the quality and quantity of supervision.
        2. Read student materials, and meet and consult with School representatives.
        3. Use recordings/analyses as a teaching tool in supervisory conferences. See Recording/Analyses as a Learning/Teaching Tool.
        4. Develop a written educational contract with the student.
        5. Provide appropriate assignments for the student at the start of placement.
      7. Field instructors who are acting as primary supervisors to MSW students for the first time are required to participate in a seminar that examines the content and process of field instruction. Prospective primary field instructors who are unable to participate in the seminar may not be considered even though they meet all the other criteria listed above. Social workers who have served as a primary field instructor for MSW students from another school are not required to take the course but may do so if they wish.
      8. If the field instructor and the student have had a pre-existing professional or social relationship, this information should be shared with the Field Education Department so that the appropriateness of the placement can be determined.
      9. The field instructor is expected to evaluate the student’s practice on a continuing basis and provide written evaluations consistent with the School’s calendar and deadlines.
      10. Field Instructor Benefits:
        1. Use of Boston University library facilities.
        2. One tuition-free continuing education workshop provided by the Boston University School of Social Work Professional Education Programs in the academic year in which they supervise. Field instructors should be aware that only two tuition-free slots will be held in each workshop, so we recommend early registration for the workshop in which the benefit is to be used. If two field instructors work with one student, only one continuing education benefit applies.
        3. Participation in continuing education seminars and workshops offered by the Field Education Department and the New England Consortium of Field Education Directors (NECON).

      Expectations of Agencies

      Agencies are expected to support the mission, goals, and values of the social work profession and the educational objectives of Boston University School of Social Work

      To ensure the student’s learning in the field, the agency is expected to provide the student with the following:

      1. A sufficient number and variety of assignments to support the progression of learning. We expect students to become involved in practice activities within two to three weeks of the start of the placement.
      2. An orientation to the agency’s missions, programs, and communities served.
      3. An orientation to the agency’s safety policies and procedures and ongoing support to ensure safety in the field.
      4. An orientation to legal and ethical issues and documentation requirements specific to the agency’s mission and programs.
      5. Adequate work space and access to telephones, computers, agency email, databases, records, etc., to fulfill the requirements of the agency and School.
      6. Reimbursement for expenses involved in rendering agency services, e.g., home visit travel costs.
      7. Adequate insurance coverage for student who are expected to use personal vehicles for agency purposes and who do not have their own insurance coverage for this type of activity.
      8. Access to staff, committee, and seminar meetings when appropriate.
      9. Use of selected agency records (appropriately disguised to ensure client and agency confidentiality) for class assignments.
      10. Use of agency consultation resources when appropriate.
      11. Adequate time so that the field instructor can meet the School’s criteria for supervising a student.

      THE STUDENT IN THE AGENCY

      Hours and Sick Leave

      The School recognizes that policies and procedures vary from agency to agency. Students are expected to adhere to their assigned agency’s personnel practices, policies, and procedures. They are expected to adhere to the same workday hours as the professional social work staff in their assigned agency. Students are expected to make up time missed for illness, lateness, or other personal reasons. Protracted absences of more than two consecutive weeks will be reviewed on an individual basis by the field instructor and the faculty advisor. In those cases in which disruption of the field experience due to repeated or protracted absence interferes with student learning and/or services to clients, a decision regarding the student’s continuation in the field placement will be made in accordance with the Problem Resolution and/or Status Review process. Requests for time off for religious observance and professional conferences should be assessed on an individual basis, and arrangements to make up such time should be made in accordance with clients’ service needs and the student’s learning needs.  In all cases, students should ensure that they meet the required number of hours for the field placement (480 for foundation placement; 720 for advanced placement).

      Vacations

      Student vacations should be taken according to the School of Social Work calendar unless otherwise negotiated with the field instructor and documented in the student’s learning contract. In some cases, an agency may be closed for religious and local holidays, and in those settings, students may take those days off as well. In some school settings, students will be required to adapt their vacations to the school calendar. In all cases, students should arrange their schedules to ensure that they meet the required number of hours for the field placement (480 for foundation placement; 720 for advanced placement).

       

      Disclosure of Student or Trainee Status

      In accordance with Massachusetts Patients’ Bill of Rights, (May 1979), the Massachusetts NASW Board of Directors made the following recommendation in December 1980, and the Boston University School of Social Work requires:

      “…that social work students identify themselves as trainees/students/interns to patients/clients either verbally or through the use of name tags except in emergency situations where it is clinically contraindicated as determined by the student and supervisor. Student’s status should be clearly designated in signing notes in the record.”

      The Boston University School of Social Work further recommends early disclosure of the length of student availability when possible.

      CORI Check

      Most agencies require a Criminal Offender Record Information (CORI) of social work interns. The agencies are responsible for conducting these evaluations, and will discuss the process with the intern. In the case of a positive CORI, the agency may decide not to accept a student. Students who have any concerns about undergoing a CORI can discuss these with a member of the Field Education Department or their faculty advisor. Placement options will be limited for students who have a record of a felony conviction. Many employers and state licensing boards also have policies regarding criminal histories which may limit employment and licensure options.

      Health Information

      In some settings (e.g., hospitals, clinics, schools) interns may be required to show evidence of immunizations or other health records. Since Massachusetts law requires that all university students be immunized against a number of diseases, providing this information to the field placement agency should not be difficult.

      EDUCATIONAL ELEMENTS OF THE FIELD PLACEMENT

      An early focus of field instruction with the student is the educational assessment, which incorporates the student’s knowledge, skills, strengths, and areas for growth into a formulation of learning goals and a learning plan. The educational assessment is based on a review of previous education and work history, an evaluation of learning style and learning phase, an understanding of the student’s professional goals, cultural factors which influence both the student’s approach to learning and the agency context, and identification of the strengths and challenges with which the student approaches the identified learning tasks. The overarching framework of social work competencies supports the content and focus of each student’s assignments.

      It is important for the field instructor to be aware of his/her characteristic teaching style, knowledge, skills, strengths and limitations, and cultural perspective, as these will influence transactions with the student. The field instructor may be called upon to develop new approaches to the teaching tasks to meet the learning needs of individual students.

      Supervision

      Field Instruction is an essential part of a student’s experience at the internship.  Boston University School of Social Work requires two hours of weekly supervision.  A minimum of one of those hours must be individual face- to-face, closed door supervision focused on the student’s learning and professional development provided by the primary MSW field instructor.  Although administrative issues are a component of supervision, the educational and supportive aspects of field instruction should be the primary focus of the individual supervision hour.  The student is practicing under the auspices of the agency and the field instructor’s license so it is important that there be enough time to discuss the student’s work.  This individual hour of supervision can include:

      • role plays
      • discussion of process recordings/analyses
      • attention to ethical dilemmas
      • application of relevant theories and research that are raised through the work that the student is doing
      • other activities that help the student develop and achieve competence.
      • observation of the student’s professional activities and immediate feedback from the field instructor can also be incorporated into this hour of supervision.

      The second hour of required weekly supervision can be provided more flexibly in the context of the agency culture and an assessment of the student’s learning needs.  The second hour can be provided by someone with an MSW, another related Master’s degree, a Ph.D., or by a Bachelor’s level staff person with expertise and program responsibility. All secondary supervisors must be approved by the BUSSW Field Education Department. Possible formats include:

      • Individual supervision provided by the primary MSW field instructor
      • Several shorter interactions with the primary field instructor (e.g., after client contacts, on the way to home or auxiliary site visits)
      • Individual supervision provided by the secondary supervisor
      • Group format such as group or dyad supervision, or clinical or other team meetings focused on the participants’ practice and learning rather than administrative issues;

      Supervision should be described in the student’s learning contract including format, who will provide the supervision, and days and times that supervision will take place.

      The Learning Contract between Field Instructor and Student

      The School expects each field instructor and student to develop a written learning contract that defines the student’s educational and professional goals and the role of the field placement in helping the student achieve required social work competencies. The School uses a standard Learning Contract which should be completed by the field instructor and student collaboratively within the first four to six weeks of the placement. A signed copy should then be sent to the faculty advisor for review and approval. The learning contract can be reviewed regularly and revised to accommodate changes in learning goals, circumstances in the agency, or logistical considerations, such as schedule changes.

      Recordings as a Learning/Teaching Tool

      The Field Education Department requires the use of process recordings/analyses as a teaching and learning tool in the field placement.

      1. Definition: Recordings refer to detailed written accounts of professional interactions, and include the following components:
        • Written by the student:
          • goals and proposed interventions (written in advance of the contract);
          • the verbal and nonverbal content of the interaction in verbatim form;
          • the student’s observations, assessment, and plans for future interventions;
          • student’s self-reflection, including feelings, barriers, successes, concerns, conclusions;
          • questions for supervision.
        • Written by the field instructor:
          • comments, questions for discussion in supervision;
          • suggestions about alternative interventions;
          • feedback regarding growth in skills over time
      2. Purposes: Recordings have a number of educational and administrative purposes including:
        • Student’s skills in sorting and remembering important information;
        • Student’s self-reflection about his/her developing skills;
        • Student’s understanding of the client(s), consumers, project;
        • Evidence of the student’s perception of the interaction and his/her own interventions;
        • Student’s ability to apply theory and empirical evidence to his/her practice;
        • Student’s ability to plan ahead;
        • A tool for evaluating the student’s progress over time;
        • A source of information for the field instructor about the student’s activities;
        • A framework for supervisory conferences.
      3. Types of Recording: Field instructors and students are encouraged to use a format that accommodates the student’s learning needs, goals, style, and the practice in the agency.
        • Clinical practice assignments, the most common form of recording is the process recording, a written account of the interactions between student and client(s). All process recording s include goals and plans for the session, the content of the interview, including the student’s interventions; the student’s impressions, reactions, observations, and assessment; plans for the next session; questions for supervision. Students will most often record face-to-face sessions with clients. Students may also record telephone or in-person contacts with family members, colleagues, or professionals in other settings. These provide opportunities to examine the interactions and use of self in other contexts and professional roles. Examples of process recording outlines are available here.
        • Macro practice assignments, the most common form of recording is the process analysis. This may take the form of a weekly journal entry that follows and analyzes the processes through which project goals and objectives are formulated and attained. Or it may be an analysis of a one-time meeting, phone call, or project. Student observations and interpretations regarding the ways that power dynamics and the use of differential leadership skills influence goal achievement and task completion are typical themes in each entry. Similar to clinical process recordings, process analyses provide an opportunity for students to integrate their observations of an activity with self-reflection focused on their professional development. However, macro practice process analysis is different from clinical process recordings  in that it is not a comprehensive verbatim account of what took place. It is also different from written work products, e.g., surveys, grant applications, minutes of meetings, work plans, reports, evaluations, etc. However, these written products often serve as the basis for process analysis as students describe and reflect on their experiences, accomplishments, learning needs, and skill levels as product developers, project leaders, and social change agents. An example of a process analysis outline is available here.
      4. Recording Policies
        • The School requires that students write at least 12 process recordings or process analyses per semester, with the intent that these will be written over the course of the semester, approximately one per week.  Field instructors may require more than this number and this expectation should be clarified in the interview process and documented in the student’s learning contract. In addition, once each semester students will write a 2-3 page reflection describing their development of the competencies in the field. Guidelines for these reflections will be given to students at the beginning of their internships. The reflection pieces may be shared with the field instructor although the advisor will be person responsible for reviewing them. Students in extended (12 month) field placements are required to write at least twelve (12) process recordings (for clinical students) or process analyses (for macro students) each semester for use in supervision.  As always, process and other reflective recordings should be used flexibly to support the student’s learning goals and level of knowledge and skill. Recording expectations should be specified in the Learning Contract.
        • Recordings are in addition to the documentation required by the agency for its own records or files.
        • Some time should be allotted in the student’s schedule at the agency to work on recordings, although students may need outside time to complete the recordings.
        • Students should be informed of and adhere to the agency’s policies regarding removal of case records and recordings from the agency premises.
        • Recordings should be sufficiently disguised to protect the confidentiality of clients or consumers .
        • Recordings should be destroyed at a point in the student’s internship when they no longer serve their educational usefulness (end of contact, end of semester, end of placement). This should be done in compliance with state law and agency policy.
        • Other forms of recording—e.g., audiotape, videotape, log—can be very useful learning tools, but do not serve the same educational or supervisory functions as written recordings. At the discretion of the field instructor, these forms of recordings may be used in addition to, but not in place of, written recordings.
        • Examples of different models or recordings are available here. Field instructors may also choose recording formats with which they are familiar and which are appropriate for the type of assignment and the student’s learning goals and needs.
        • Failure to adhere to the policies and procedures regarding recordings may lead to the convening of a Problem Resolution meeting and/or may be reflected in the student’s grade in Field Education
        • In addition, please note that teaching recordings skills is primarily the responsibility of the field instructor, although this learning is supported and reinforced in methods courses at the School.
      5. Guide for Disguise of Confidential Practice Material (e.g., Process Recordings, Case Records, Meeting Minutes, Group Recordings). Students and field instructors should ensure that agency documents and recordings are de-identified in accordance with HIPAA regulations. Agencies are expected to provide students with the same training provided to employees regarding HIPAA regulations related to the specific setting. In settings which are not covered by HIPAA, students are expected to protect client confidentiality in accordance with professional practice standards, including but not necessarily limited to the following:
        • Delete any reference to the agency name and/or worker names.
        • Change client names (first and last) and initials.
        • Delete any reference to address or any information specifying geographical area, such as street names, businesses, or hospitals.
        • Delete any information that would enable identification of clients, agencies, or agency personnel.

      Assignments

      The Field Education Department expects students to become involved in supervised independent practice activities within the first few weeks of field placement. Early work with clients, groups, committees, or projects allows students to begin integrating learning from class and field and it enables field instructors to begin the educational assessment of the student.

      Foundation-year students are expected to spend half of their placement time in independent practice activities—e.g., face-to-face contacts with clients, preparation for practice activities, family meetings, team meetings and case conferences around their clients, participation in committee or community group meetings, resource development, telephone contacts, and recruitment for groups. Advanced-year students should spend two-thirds of their time in this way. The remaining hours for all students include time for supervision, inservice trainings, administrative meetings, documentation, and recordings. Any questions regarding sufficiency of assignment load should be addressed with the faculty advisor.

      Assignments are based on consideration of service needs, the student’s skill development and learning goals, and in some cases recognition of the student’s personal and professional experiences that may influence the learning process.

      Field Education Portfolio

      All students are required to create a Field Education Portfolio, either digital or hard copy, in which they keep material related to their learning in the field.

      1. The purposes of the portfolio are:
        • To provide organized evidence of field education learning
        • To ensure that the student has copies of the learning contract and evaluations from both field placements
        • To ensure that the student is meeting process recording or process analysis requirements
      2. The portfolio includes:
        • Syllabus for the Integrative Field Seminar (for foundation students)
        • A copy of her/his learning contract
        • Agency material (e.g., orientation, workshop, or seminar outlines) that describes learning experiences in the setting
        • Process recordings or process analyses, appropriately disguised
        • Field instructor evaluations from both semesters
        • For clinical students, copies of two psychosocial assessments, appropriately disguised (can be from clinical course or agency assignments)
        • Any other evidence of projects or activities in which the student played a role and which demonstrates his/her learning. Examples could include group curriculum used by student in leading a group, outline and handouts from a workshop designed and run by student, material developed for a community education project, grant proposal, press release, etc.
        • Assignments from classroom courses that relate specifically to the students field placement (MP 759 assignment) or Task Force reports (WP 701).

      The Portfolio may be requested for Field Education meetings or agency interviews.

      Evaluation and Feedback

      Field instructors are responsible for evaluating the student’s performance at the end of each semester using the School’s assessment/evaluation tool. The content of the evaluation is consistent with the Competencies for Field Education and should be reviewed and incorporated into the student’s learning contract. By the end of the foundation practicum, students are expected to demonstrate competence. By the end of the advanced practicum, students are expected to again achieve competence ratings in advanced competencies specific to their method concentration (Clinical or Macro).

      Assessment of the student’s learning should be an ongoing process, and the student and field instructor should regularly give feedback to each other regarding the field education experience. Feedback in the written evaluation should not be new to the student or the field instructor. Students and field instructors should discuss any concerns as they emerge, and not just at the formal evaluation time. Student participation in the evaluation process is required and should be discussed early in the placement. If a student believes s/he has been evaluated unfairly or incorrectly, even after discussing this with the field instructor, the faculty advisor should be contacted for help in resolving the differences.  If the student continues to believe that the evaluation is not accurate, s/he is encouraged to write an addendum to the evaluation describing the differences in assessment and including any other relevant information.  If these differences are representative of significant problems in the supervisory relationship or the field placement experience, a Problem Resolution meeting will be convened.

      Students have the opportunity to complete an assessment of their placement at the end of each semester. This information is reviewed by the Field Education Department and is one tool used to monitor the field experience. Students’ assessments of their placements are kept in agency files which are available for all students to read. In addition, students and field instructors have the opportunity to provide feedback to the Field Education Department about their experience working with their faculty advisor.

      Grade for Field Education

      Field Education is graded on a Pass-Fail basis. The grade is recommended by the faculty advisor in consultation with the field instructor(s). Students must complete the entire placement in order to receive credit and a grade for the course.

      Values and Ethics

      Professional social work practice is guided by social work values and ethics. Students are expected to understand their personal values as well as those of the profession and to examine the application of these values in their work with clients, consumers, agencies, and colleagues. In addition, students should be helped to identify and sort out, in an open atmosphere, value and ethical dilemmas that emerge in their work and in the larger agency context, and to make thoughtful decisions with appropriate supervision regarding social work practice in these situations. The faculty advisor is also available to consult with the field instructor about ethical and value issues that evolve in the student’s experience at the agency. Field instructors should refer to the NASW and other relevant codes of ethics and to state licensing laws in their discussions with students about ethical behavior.

      Legal Issues

      Students should also be informed of the relevant legal aspects of practice within the particular agency setting. Examples include, but are not limited to, confidentiality and its exceptions, duty to warn, mandated reporting, informed consent, definitions of malpractice, and record-keeping. In situations where legal issues are involved, students should be given appropriate supervision, administrative sanction, and access to and support from legal expertise.

      PLACEMENT SCHEDULE OPTIONS

      Standard Concurrent

       

       

      Standard concurrent placements run from mid-September through the first week in May. Generally, students in foundation (first) placements are in the field two days/week (16 hours), and students in advanced (second) placements are in the field three days/week (24 hours). In some cases, students arrange alternative schedules that might include evenings or blocks of time on different days.

      This concurrent placement arrangement is used by the majority of full-time and some part-time students.  In some situations, part-time students in the advanced year in field education opt to start their two-semester placement in January or May and continue through August or December respectively. Students interested in exploring this variation of the concurrent placement should first meet with the Director of Student Services or, for off-campus students, with the Director of the Off-Campus Program to ensure that their course requirements can be met under this arrangement.

      Summer Block

       

       

      The summer block option may be available (subject to enrollment) to part-time Charles River campus students for their foundation placement. Students are in placement 32 hours/week for fifteen weeks from mid-May through the end of August. The Introduction to Methods courses (Clinical Practice with Individuals, Groups and Families, and Communities and Organizations) are offered at the Charles River Campus concurrent with the summer block placement and are required of students who choose this program.

      To be considered for a summer block placement, students must meet the following criteria:

      • two years of continuous work and/or internship experience in a social service setting;
      • 3.0 GPA on admission to the MSW program;
      • 3.0 average in courses graded at the time they begin the summer block.

      Modified Block

      Students may do their advanced placements in a block format of 28, 32, or 36 hours/week for 26, 22.5, or 20 weeks, respectively, as long as the concurrency requirements of method courses are met.

      Twelve-Month Extended Placement

      (January-January, May-May, September-September)

      In the extended placement option, students complete their advanced-year field placements over twelve months. Consistent with the requirements for all the options, students must spend a minimum of 16 hours/week in placement and can begin only in January, May, or September. Again, students choosing this option need to arrange their academic curse schedule so that they can take major methods courses concurrently with the field placement. Students choosing this option will be required to pay tuition for three semesters of Field Education.

      Additional Comments

      • The Field Education Department and the Off-Campus Program Directors are available to discuss an individual student’s needs regarding field placement structure. Students are expected to complete the majority of their field placement time during regular weekday business hours. Some agencies require or are able to offer limited evening and/or weekend time for placement.
      • Students choosing any option other than the standard concurrent model should clarify tuition and registration arrangements with the Field Education Department or Off-Campus Program Director.

      FIELD EDUCATION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

      Behavioral Standards for Social Work Students

      Becoming a social worker involves acquiring knowledge and skills as well as demonstrating attitudes and values that are congruent with professional standards. Attention to the standards will be paid by faculty responsible for evaluating students’ classroom performance, by field instructors, faculty advisors, and other agency personnel responsible for evaluating field performance, and by administrators and others with whom the students interact within the School of Social Work community.

      Social work students are expected to adhere to standards in the classroom, field, and within the larger Boston University School of Social Work community .

      • Behavior: in interactions with faculty, administrators, staff, agency personnel, clients/consumers, and other students, act in accordance with the mission of the Boston University School of Social Work, and the goals and standards of social work as outlined in the NASW Code of Ethics, e.g., commitment to social and economic justice, client self-determination, integrity, human dignity and human diversity (www.socialworkers.org/pubs/code/code.asp), the Boston University Code of Student Responsibility (http://www.bu.edu/dos/policies/student-responsibilities/), the Boston University School of Social Work Academic Standards, and the Boston University School of Social Work Sexual Harassment Policy and Procedures.
      • Self-awareness: openness to new ideas, differing opinions and feedback from others, and integration of these into professional and student roles and performance; an understanding of the effect of one’s statements and behaviors on others; the ability to modulate one’s behavior to promote a productive professional environment and appropriate relationships; a willingness to examine one’s beliefs, values, and assumptions, and change one’s behavior to ensure ethical professional practice.
      • Academic: critical evaluation and application of knowledge and research findings to professional performance; classroom participation that promotes academic freedom, complies with guidelines for respectful classroom behavior, complies with instructor’s directives, and allows for course instruction and participation of all students.
      • Interpersonal: interpersonal skills needed to relate effectively to students, faculty, school personnel, agency staff, clients, and other professionals; these include compassion, empathy, integrity, respect and consideration, reliability, and responsibility for one’s own behavior.
      • Self-care: the ability to engage in appropriate self-care and seek resources and/or treatment for medical and emotional problems that interfere with academic and professional performance.
      • Appropriate use of existing channels of communication (e.g., faculty advisor, classroom instructors, department chairs, Boston University School of Social Work administrators, field instructors) and procedures for addressing problems and concerns at the School of Social Work as outlined in the Student Handbook: Ways and Means and this Guide.

      Failure to act in accordance with these standards may result in suspension or termination from Boston University School of Social Work. In addition to any sanction imposed by the University’s Dean of Students, a student who has been found guilty by the University’s Dean of Students for a violation of the University Code of Student Responsibilities is subject to suspension or termination by the Boston University School of Social Work Dean following the procedures of the Boston University School of Social Work Status Review. If in the judgment of the Boston University School of Social Work Dean, interim steps are appropriate, pending the determination of a matter by Status Review, the Dean may impose such interim conditions, which may include an interim suspension from courses and/or field placement.

      Sexual Harassment Policy and Procedures

      Boston University is committed to the principle that no employee, student, or applicant for employment or admission should be subject to sexual harassment. The University strives to provide workplaces and learning environments that promote equal opportunity and are free from illegal discriminatory practices, including sexual harassment.

      Sexual harassment is a violation of federal and state laws and University policy, as is retaliation against any individual who in good faith files a complaint of sexual harassment or retaliation, Boston University will undertake a fair and thorough investigation, with due regard for the rights of all parties. Every reasonable effort will be made to protect the confidentialities of the parties during the investigation. After an investigation, any person who is found to have sexually harassed or retaliated against another will be subject to discipline, up to and including termination of employment and, if a student, expulsion from Boston University.

      1. Definition of Sexual Harassment
        • Sexual harassment is defined as sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and any other verbal or physical contact of a sexual nature, whether intentional or unintentional, where:
          • an individual’s submission to or rejection of the conduct is made, either explicitly or the conduct implicitly, a term or condition of employment or of status in a course, program or activity, or is used as a basis for an employment or academic decision; or,
          • has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance, academic performance, or educational experience, or of creating an intimidating, hostile, humiliating or offensive working, educational, or living environment.
      2. Examples of Conduct Which May Constitute Sexual Harassment
        • It is not possible to list all circumstances that might constitute sexual harassment. It encompasses any sexually related conduct which causes others discomfort, embarrassment, or humiliation, and any harassing conduct, sexually related or otherwise, directed toward an individual because of an individual’s sex. Such conduct is subject to this policy whenever it occurs in a context related to the employment or academic environments, or if it is imposed upon an individual by virtue of an employment or academic relationship.A determination of whether conduct constitutes sexual harassment is dependent upon the totality of the circumstances, including the pervasiveness or severity of the conduct. The Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination lists the following as examples of conduct which may constitute sexual harassment:
          • Unwelcome sexual advances, whether they involve physical touching or not;
          • Sexual epithets, jokes, written or oral references to sexual conduct, gossip regarding one’s sex life;
          • Comment on an individual’s body, comment about an individual’s sexual activity, deficiencies, or prowess
          • Displaying sexually suggestive objects, pictures, or cartoons;
          • Unwelcome leering, whistling, brushing against the body, sexual gestures, or suggestive or insulting comments;
          • Inquiries into one’s sexual experiences; and
          • Discussion of one’s sexual activities.
        • As a university, Boston University, its employees and students also must be aware of the need for freedom of inquiry and openness of discussion in its educational and research programs, and must strive to create and maintain an atmosphere of intellectual seriousness and mutual tolerance in which these essential features of academic life can thrive. No university can or should guarantee that every idea expressed in its classroom laboratories will be inoffensive to all; pursued seriously, education and scholarship necessarily entail raising questions about received opinion and conventional interpretation. Boston University does guarantee, however, that credible accusations of inappropriate sexual remarks or actual will be investigated promptly, thoroughly, and fairly.
      3. Boston University School of Social Work Sexual Harassment Procedure
        • Should any student have a question, wish to discuss an issue, or wish to file a complaint, the Boston University School of Social Work procedure on sexual harassment is as follows. For concerns regarding interactions in the classroom or in the BUSSW environment, students may contact the University’s Equal Opportunity Officer, at 617-353-9286. Please refer to http://www.bu.edu/eoo/policies-procedures/complaint/ for a description of the investigation process.
      4. Sexual Harassment and Field Education
        • While we recognize that field instructors and other agency personnel are not employees of Boston University, and students are not employees of the agency, the School of Social Work is committed to the protection of all parties in the field education process from sexual harassment. Accordingly, we advise all agencies to apprise students of their policies regarding sexual harassment and to discuss agency procedures for reporting incidents of sexual harassment.
      5. Procedures
        • A student who believes s/he has been sexually harassed by a field instructor, other agency employee, or client should contact the Assistant Dean for Field Education to discuss the situation and to determine what steps should be taken regarding his/her status at the agency. The Assistant Dean for Field Education, in consultation with the University’s Equal Opportunity officer, will investigate the complaint. This investigation could involve discussions with the field instructor, other relevant agency personnel, and the person alleged to have committed the harassment. It should be noted that the investigation may be restricted by the jurisdiction the School has over the agency. In addition, the student may have rights to a complaint filed with and investigated by the agency itself or appropriate government agencies.At the conclusion of the investigation, the Assistant Dean for Field Education and the student will make a judgment regarding the student’s status at the agency:
          • The agency has satisfactorily addressed the complaint, and the student is willing to remain in the placement.
          • The agency has satisfactorily addressed the complaint, but the student should be placed in another setting.
          • The agency has not responded satisfactorily, and the student should be placed in another setting.
          • The complaint of sexual harassment is unfounded, and further investigation into the situation is warranted.
        • Where a complaint against an agency or its personnel is found to be justified, the agency’s response and corrective action will also be taken into account by the School in determining whether that agency will be used for future placements.
        • If a complaint if sexual harassment is made by a client or agency employee against a student, the School will invoke the above procedure and will cooperate with any additional steps taken by the agency. The School’s goal in such a situation is to work collaboratively with the agency toward a mutually acceptable outcome. The School recognizes the agency’s right to terminate the placement of any student who has violated the law and/or agency policy.

      Drug and Alcohol Policy

      The Boston University “Policy on Illegal Drugs and Alcohol” describes the University’s position on alcohol and drug use on campus.  In addition, social work students have a professional obligation articulated in the NASW Code of Ethics, to “not allow their own personal problems, psychosocial distress, legal problems, substance abuse, or mental health difficulties to interfere with their professional judgment and performance or to jeopardize the best interests of people for whom they have a professional responsibility.” Accordingly, students are expected to abide by the University’s policy and to refrain from drug or alcohol use while at in their internships or engaged in activities on behalf of their internship assignments.

      Safety Policy and Procedures

      The Field Education Department oversees the student’ experiences in their field placements and their safety in the field. The following guidelines, procedures, and tips were created in recognition of the fact that physical vulnerability of professional social workers and violence in the lives of clients/consumers/communities are current realities. This policy clarifies the respective roles of the School, the agency, and the student with the goal of collaboration to maximize safe practice. While social workers may be more aware of these issues in inner-city areas, we believe issues of safety are relevant in all communities and settings.

      1. Responsibilities and Roles
        • Boston University School of Social Work will:
          • Provide students with an overview of safety in the field through the Integrative Field Seminar.
          • Provide students with a copy of the School’s Safety Policy and Procedures.
          • Provide a workshop for students to teach knowledge and skills that promotes safe social work practice.
          • Encourage faculty to incorporate content related to safety into lectures and discussions in the classroom.
          • Provide training to faculty advisors about student safety and orientation to the School’s Safety Policy and Procedures. Faculty advisors will discuss safety issues at the site visit.
          • Offer workshops that address social worker safety to field placement agencies through the BUSSW Professional Education Programs, New England Consortium of Field Education Directors (NECON) Professional Development Series, and other continuing education opportunities provided by the Field Education Department.
        • Field Placement Agencies will:
          • Orient students to the safety policies and procedures of the agency. Such orientation should include, but not be limited to, discussion of safety issues in the community, within the agency building(s), and with particular clients. Security of personal belongings should be included. Students should also be informed of and trained in health precautions and protocols appropriate for the setting. Procedures for the student(s) to follow in the event of a safety or security problem should be reviewed.
          • Include in the learning contract information about the agency’s orientation to safety and the training opportunities it provides to students to develop skills and knowledge that will maximize safe social work practice.
          • Not require students to engage in assignments in which they feel physically at risk.
          • Make the same accommodations to ensure students’ safety as they make for their staff.
          • Contact the student’s faculty advisor if the student’s concerns about safety interfere with the learning process. In consultation with the faculty advisor (and in some instances with a member of the Field Education staff) develop a plan that addresses the student’s educational needs and the agency’s requirement to provide services.
        • Social Work Students should:
          • Read and be familiar with the safety policy and procedures of the School and of the agency where they are place and abide by health precautions and protocols related to the specific agency setting.
          • Attend orientation, workshops, and training programs related to safety and safe social work practice offered at the School and their agency.
          • Read and be familiar with Safety Tips for Students in the Field.
          • Not engage in assignments in which they feel physically at risk. If a student is concerned about his/her safety, the student should inform the field instructor. The faculty advisor and field instructor should consult to determine the best course of action to support the student’s education.

      2. Procedures for Reporting an Incident
        • If an incident occurs in which a student is threatened or hurt, the field instructor, agency contact person, or agency director should contact the Assistant Dean for Field Education immediately to discuss the actions the agency and school should take to ensure the student’s physical and emotional well-being.
        • The Assistant Dean for Field Education will document the incident and the steps taken to address it. She will meet with the student and faculty advisor to discuss the situation, assess the immediate and ongoing risk, and find a resolution that promotes the student’s sense of well-being and the learning process.
      3. Safety Tips for Students in the Field
        • Agency Protocol
          • It is important for students to know the agency’s protocol for safety and security. The following are guidelines and suggestions that may be helpful to students, field instructors, and faculty advisors as they consider the particular safety issues in their settings. Specific steps taken by students or agency personnel will obviously have to be determined by the individual situation, the nature of the setting, etc. The agency should know the student’s schedule and whereabouts at all times, especially when the student is working outside the building.
        • Security of Belongings
          • The agency is responsible for providing students with a secure place to keep belongings while at placement. It is preferable that the space be one that can be locked (e.g., a desk drawer or filing cabinet). Students should not leave cell phones, laptops, backpacks, purses, and other personal articles visible and unattended, even in an office with the door closed. Valuables should not be brought to placement settings. Items of value should not be left in cars, and should not be placed out of view just prior to leaving a vehicle.
        • Safety Issues Related to Working with Clients
          • Social work students work with clients/consumers in a range of settings and situations. Some of these include work with individuals dealing with overwhelming emotions and environmental stressors that result in behaviors that are or appear to be threatening. These behaviors may include (but are not limited to) swearing, yelling, insulting, threatening or acting to cause physical harm, and other out-of-control behavior.

            Some individuals may be prone to violence and may possess a weapon. Others may be intoxicated, high on drugs, in withdrawal, or may have other medical, psychiatric, or neurological disorders. Again, we would like to emphasize that students should always consult with agency field instructors regarding preparation for and handling of specific situations that are potentially difficult or threatening, such as medical emergencies, suicide or homicide risks, potential abuse of others, and the presence of weapons.
        • Safety Tips for Office Meetings
          • When considering the location of an office meeting, it is important to consider what is in the room, whether there is more than one exit, and where each person will sit. When scheduling an appointment, it is helpful to think about whether other people should be around and available at the time of the meeting for help if needed. Also, it is important to have a plan for assistance in the event that a client/consumer becomes agitated. This may include having another staff person in the meeting.

            Clothing that is provocative is never appropriate and, in some instances, may impede one’s ability to act in an unsafe situation, e.g., high heeled shoes, tight skirts, long scarves. Jewelry can also be used to injure the worker.
        • Safety Tips for Travel
          • When a student is traveling by car for field education activities, it is advisable to have clear directions and know where he or she is going. In general, it is important to be alert and attentive to one’s surroundings, and to lock doors and close windows. Valuables should be placed out of sight in one’s vehicle prior to parking at the destination.

            When traveling by foot or public transportation, it is advisable that students carry as little as possible. Money, license, keys, and other essentials should be carried in a pocket if possible. If a bag or briefcase is grabbed, it is best to let go of it. It is advisable to dress in comfortable clothes that are loose fitting, and to wear sturdy, flat walking shoes. It is also helpful to be alert, and to walk with a purpose, as if one has a clear destination. One should be aware of people in the immediate area, without staring or maintaining eye contact.
        • Safety Tips for Home Visits
          • Prior to making a home visit, the student should discuss any issues related to safety with their field instructor. On an initial home visit, it is often advisable to go with another worker. Most agencies will want to know the location and scheduling of the home visits. Some agencies require a confirming telephone call upon arrival and departure from the home visit. If the student feels unsafe upon arrival or at any time during the visit, s/he should not proceed with the meeting. It might be preferable to meet at a neutral location.

            Students and Field Instructors can access helpful information and resources related to the safety of social workers in the field on the NASW Mass Chapter web page.

      Students with Disabilities

      Students with disabilities who may need accommodation in the field placement are strongly encouraged to talk with a member of the Field Education staff.  Efforts will be made to work with prospective agencies and field instructors to ensure that students will receive the supports they need to function well within the agency setting.  Students are also encouraged to talk with Director of Student Services at the School of Social Work who is the liaison to Boston University Disability Services.

      Professional Liability Coverage for Students

      Students in the field are covered by the University’s liability insurance only for the semesters in which they are registered for a Field Education course.  If a student begins placement prior to the first day of the semester or continues beyond the last day, the student is considered a volunteer or, if paid, an employee of the agency and should be covered under the agency’s liability policy. A certificate of insurance is available upon request to the Field Education Department.

      FIELD EDUCATION COMPETENCIES

      The Urban Mission in Field Education

      The Boston University School of Social Work educates social work practitioners who possess the knowledge and skills to address the needs and potentials of individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities using clinical and macro practice methods. The integrated program of classroom and field education emphasizes the engagement of personal and community strengths to understand, prevent, and resolve individual and social problems, particularly in urban and diverse communities. The Boston University School of Social Work is committed to education which furthers social and economic justice in the urban environment. This urban mission emphasizes empowerment of oppressed groups, leadership that strengthens urban communities, and the unique capacities and challenges of urban settings with diverse populations. Students should have the opportunity in their field placements to learn and demonstrate knowledge, skills and values that will prepare them to practice in accordance with the mission of the school and the profession.

      The School’s MSW program and urban mission guide the sequencing, content, and structure of both the classroom and field curricula. The following field education competencies outline the essential social work values, knowledge, and skills that students are expected to demonstrate in their work with clients and consumers.

      Students come to both placements with a range of educational, internship, and work experiences and some may require a more sustained introduction to the social work profession and to their professional roles and activities. However, by the end of both placements, all students are expected to demonstrate competence in the following:

      Foundation Competencies

      Advanced Clinical Competencies

      Advanced Macro Competencies

      Foundation Competencies

      1Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly.

      • advocate for client/consumer/community access to services
      • demonstrate self-reflection that supports professional growth
      • function within clearly defined professional roles and boundaries
      • demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and communication
      • engage in professional development opportunities that set the stage for career-long learning, e.g., agency seminars, conferences, workshops
      • use supervision and consultation within the agency structure and in keeping with lines of authority and the student role
      • follow safety protocols and procedures of the agency

      2Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice.

      • identify personal values and biases to ensure behavior consistent with professional values
      • make ethical decisions by applying NASW Code of Ethics
      • tolerate ambiguity in resolving ethical conflicts
      • apply strategies of ethical reasoning in consultation with field instructors, and others with expertise and authority

      3Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments.

      • Identify, evaluate and integrate multiple sources of knowledge
      • recognize underlying values, biases and assumptions in oneself, other people and in sources of knowledge
      • critically analyze models of assessment, prevention, intervention, and evaluation
      • demonstrate effective communication:
        • in writing
        • verbally
        • electronically

      4Engage diversity and difference in practice.

      • recognize how cultures may support or oppress clients/consumers and communities
      • demonstrate self-awareness to minimize the influence of personal biases and values in working with people
      • understand how differences can shape life experiences and apply this understanding in social work practice
      • learn about culture from multiple sources including clients/consumers

      5Advance human rights and social and economic justice.

      • understand how oppression and discrimination impact the agency, community and clients/consumers
      • engage in practices that advance social and economic justice and human rights for clients/consumers and communities

      6Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research.

      • use research evidence to inform practice
      • understand how practice experience can inform the research process

      7Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment (HBSE).

      • Apply and critique relevant HBSE theory to guide prevention, assessment, intervention and evaluation

      8Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services.

      • analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies (e.g., agency, program, legislative) that advance client/consumer and/or community well-being
      • collaborate with colleagues and clients/consumers for effective policy action

      9Respond to contexts that shape practice.

      • recognize how social, cultural, economic and technological changes impact services provided
      • provide leadership, appropriate to the student role, to promote improved service delivery

      10(a)–(d)Engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

      (a)Engagement

      • apply  social work knowledge to engage individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities
      • use professional and interpersonal skills to facilitate engagement
      • develop a mutually agreed-on focus of work and desired outcomes within the agency’s mandate

      (b)Assessment

      • collect, organize, and interpret client/consumer/community data
      • assess client/consumer/community strengths and limitations
      • develop mutually agreed-on intervention goals and objectives
      • write an assessment in agency format appropriate to the focus of the assignment
      • select appropriate intervention strategies

      (c)Intervention

      • implement appropriate prevention and intervention strategies that build upon and enhance client/consumer/community capacities
      • help clients/consumers/communities resolve problems
      • negotiate, mediate, and advocate with and on behalf of clients/consumers/communities
      • facilitate transitions and endings

      (d)Evaluation

      • critically analyze, monitor, and evaluate interventions

      ADVANCED COMPETENCIES

      Students in the advanced field placement concentrate in either Clinical or Macro Practice and a majority of their assignments should reflect their area of concentration. In addition to mastering new skills, advanced students are expected to demonstrate increased independence and initiative in their assignments and in supervision.

      Some students may concentrate in Clinical Practice with a Macro sub-specialization. Students may also choose to focus their studies in one of the MSW certificate or specialization programs (Clinical Social Work and Behavioral Medicine, Family Therapy, Group Work, Gerontological Social Work, Human Service Management, Trauma).

      Field education guidelines for method specializations:

      • Clinical Practice with a Macro sub-specialization: 15-20% of the student’s assignment should include a substantive macro practice project with field instruction that incorporates a macro practice framework.
      • Clinical Social Work and Behavioral Medicine Certificate: the student should have the opportunity to develop knowledge and skills related to the behavioral aspects of complex illnesses and disorders such as Alzheimer’s, the addictions, HIV/AIDS, and mental illness.
      • Family Therapy Certificate Program: the student’s assignment should include clinical practice with families, with field instruction that incorporates a family systems theoretical framework.
      • Gerontological Social Work: the student’s assignments should focus on services and programs for older adults and their families.
      • Group Work Specialization: the student should work with at least two groups in a leadership or co-leadership role with field instruction that incorporates group work theory.
      • Trauma Certificate Program: the student should have the opportunity to practice with clients who have experienced significant trauma with field instruction that incorporates a trauma theory perspective.
      • Management Certificate: the student should have the opportunity to be exposed to and practice an array of management and administrative functions.

      ADVANCED CLINICAL COMPETENCIES

      1Identify as a professional clinical social worker and conduct oneself accordingly.

      • advocate for client access to social work services within the context of the clinical  relationship
      • demonstrate self-reflection through understanding and application of transference/countertransference; demonstrate ability to monitor one’s responses to clients’ presentation based on a clinical assessment of the client
      • function within clearly-defined professional roles and boundaries based on the needs of the client, the agency context, the type of service provided, and differential use of self
      • demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and communication appropriate to the clinical relationship and setting
      • engage in career-long learning by identifying areas for professional development and seeking additional learning opportunities
      • engage in supervision with increased initiative, independence, responsibility for agenda and appropriate use of consultation within the agency structure and lines of authority
      • follow safety protocols and procedures of the agency

      2Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice.

      • integrate personal with professional values to appropriately guide clinical practice
      • make ethical decisions in clinical practice by applying standards of the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics and by using additional ethical decision making models and resources; (e.g. ethics hotline, committees)
      • take action to resolve complex ethical conflicts in clinical practice while acknowledging ambiguity
      • apply strategies of ethical reasoning related to clinical practice to arrive at principled decisions using consultation appropriately

      3Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments.

      • identify, evaluate and integrate multiple sources of knowledge (e.g., clinical theory, evidenced based practices and practice wisdom)
      • recognize underlying values, biases and assumptions in oneself, other people and in sources of knowledge
      • apply critical analysis to models of clinical prevention, assessment, prevention, intervention, and evaluation
      • demonstrate communication
        • in writing (client records, reports, group curricula)
        • verbally (team meetings, case conferences, communication with collaterals)
        • electronically (record keeping, e-mails)

      4Engage diversity and difference in practice.

      • recognize how culture may oppress, marginalize, or create privilege and power which may be replicated in the clinical relationship and practice
      • develop culturally sensitive and relevant clinical skills that integrate self awareness with knowledge from clients and other sources
      • develop relationships based on understanding how culture shapes life experiences and impacts clinical work

      5Advance human rights and social and economic justice.

      • engage in clinical practice that advances human rights and social and economic justice

      6Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research.

      • use an evidenced based process to identify effective clinical interventions for particular populations, problems and settings
      • where possible, apply practice experience to the development of new knowledge through participation in research

      7Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment (HBSE).

      • critique and apply HBSE theories (e.g., strengths, ecological, cognitive-behavioral, interpersonal, family systems, life-span development, psychodynamic) to guide clinical prevention, assessment, intervention, and evaluation

      8Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services.

      • analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies (e.g., agency, program, legislative) that advance social well-being for individuals and families
      • collaborate with colleagues and clients for effective policy action that promotes social and economic justice

      9Respond to contexts that shape practice.

      • provide relevant services based on changes within communities and populations, scientific and technological developments, and emerging societal trends
      • provide leadership consistent with the student’s role to promote changes in service delivery

      10(a)–(d)Engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

      (a)Engagement

      • develop relationships with clients that are professional, purposeful, and differentiated characterized by clear boundaries
      • develop relationships that are culturally appropriate
      • encourage clients to be equal partners in the establishment of treatment goals and methods
      • utilize a range of skills to facilitate engagement

      (b)Assessment

      • clarify the client’s request for help and presenting problem
      • identify strengths and resources available to the client                                                         
      • gather and organize appropriate information including history from a variety of sources
      • formulate an understanding of the client including precipitants to the presenting problem, interpersonal dynamics and historically relevant events                                       
      • when appropriate, utilize this formulation to aid in diagnosis              
      • collaborate with the client to define goals within the context of the agency’s services           
      • routinely write biopsychosocial assessments in agency format

      (c)Intervention

      • initiate and implement treatment plans and contracts with the client to meet goals, based on appropriate theory and research evidence
      • document as required in agency record
      • utilize clinical frameworks and treatment protocols appropriately                                    
      • appropriately facilitate termination and/or referral for continued service

      (d)Evaluation

      • evaluate client progress and intervention effectiveness (e.g., client self-assessment and satisfaction, collateral reports, behavioral outcome measures)        
      • document the client’s progress in agency records as required

      ADVANCED MACRO COMPETENCIES

      1Identify as a professional macro practice social worker and conduct oneself accordingly.

      • advocate for access to social work services based on consumer, constituent, community and organization needs and assets
      • demonstrate self- reflection related to one’s strengths, motivation, limitations, and work-style
      • function in professional roles based on the needs of the consumers or constituents, the organization and community, the type of service provided, clear role definition and differential use of self
      • demonstrate professional demeanor in behavior, appearance, and communication appropriate to the macro role and setting
      • engage in career-long learning by identifying areas for professional development and seeking additional learning opportunities
      • engage in supervision with increased initiative, independence, collaboration and consultation within the agency structure in keeping with lines of authority and the student role
      • Follow safety protocols and procedures of the agency

      2Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice.

      • integrate personal with professional values to appropriately guide macro practice
      • make ethical decisions by applying standards of the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics and by using additional ethical decision making models and resources (e.g. ethics hotline, committees)
      • take action to resolve complex ethical dilemmas in macro practice while acknowledging ambiguity
      • apply strategies of ethical reasoning and decision-making related to macro practice to arrive at principled decisions using consultation appropriately
      • develop professional relationships that recognize the power differences between clients and workers and take steps to minimize harm related to the misuse of power

      3Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments.

      • identify, evaluate, and integrate multiple sources of knowledge (e.g., macro theories and evidence-based research and practice)
      • recognize underlying values, biases and assumptions in oneself, other people and in sources of knowledge
      • apply critical analysis to macro practice models of prevention, assessment, intervention, and evaluation
      • demonstrate effective communication with constituents/consumers, organizations, communities, and colleagues:
        • in writing (e.g., proposals, press releases, newsletters)
        • verbally (e.g., public speaking, chairing meeting)
        • electronically (e.g., use of electronic media, website development)

      4Engage diversity and difference in practice.

      • recognize how culture may oppress, marginalize, or create privilege and power dynamics which are replicated in services and policies in institutions and communities;
      • minimize the influence of personal biases and values in macro practice
      • develop cultural competence that integrates self-awareness and knowledge from a variety of sources
      • build professional relationships with diverse consumers, constituents, communities and organizations to provide culturally competent services and programs

      5Advance human rights and social and economic justice.

      • engage with and support the empowerment of community members who have the least power and are often the most vulnerable in terms of access to community resources, opportunities, and decision-making forums.
      • advocate for inclusive strategies that help all community members reach their full potential
      • reduce structural and cultural barriers that discriminate against people

      6Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research.

      • use an evidenced based process to identify effective macro interventions for consumers, communities and organizations
      • Where possible, apply practice experience to development of new knowledge through participation in research
      • utilize qualitative and quantitative research to understand the nature of communities and organizations and the best practices to improve well-being in these macro systems

      7Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment (HBSE).

      • Apply HBSE theories including systems, organizational, empowerment and social capital to guide assessment, Intervention and evaluation
      • critique and apply these theoretical frameworks to macro practice

      8Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services.

      • analyze, formulate, and advocate for policies (e.g., agency, program, legislative) that advance social well-being of constituents, communities and organizations
      • collaborate with colleagues, consumers and constituents for effective policy action that promotes social and economic justice
      • actively engage in the policy arena on behalf of community and organizational interests, working collaboratively to formulate policies that improve the effectiveness of social services and the wellbeing of people, especially for the most vulnerable

      9Respond to contexts that shape practice.

      • provide relevant services based on changes within communities and populations, scientific and technological developments, and emerging societal trends
      • provide leadership consistent with student’s role to promote sustainable changes in communities and organizations

      10(a)–(d)Engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

      (a)Engagement

      • develop partnerships with and among consumers, constituents, organizations and communities  that are based on participation, empowerment, collaboration, indigenous leadership
      • develop partnerships that are culturally appropriate
      • utilize a range of skills that facilitate engagement e.g., outreach and recruitment, collaboration, coalition building

      (b)Assessment

      • identify assets, resources and needs of the consumer, community or organization                  
      • gather and organize appropriate information from a variety of sources
      • analyze assessment data to develop agreed-upon outcomes
      • engage formal & informal (nontraditional) sectors of the community in the assessment process

      (c)Intervention

      • collaborate with consumers, communities and/or organizations to identify desired process and outcomes objectives, and time and project management
      • develop a strategic and tactical action plan to achieve outcomes and objectives
      • plans with communities & organizations to apply interventions through a variety of models appropriate to local contexts
      • initiate appropriate actions, (e.g., coalition-building, mediation, grass-roots organizing, program planning, leadership development, proposal writing, board development, supervision and staff development)
      • create necessary documents for projects or actions, (e.g., strategic plan, grant proposal, personnel manual, marketing materials)
      • complete necessary steps in activity or project and transfer responsibility for ongoing maintenance where appropriate

      (d)Evaluation

      • utilize a variety of methods/tools to evaluate and document intervention outcomes and effectiveness (e.g., program evaluation, consumer satisfaction survey, external review)
      • utilize and demonstrate skill in a variety of process and output methods that stress participatory principles
      • use evaluation results to inform an/or improve future intervention