Tips

Get help in using the CHARTBOOK. Click on the links below for suggestions on how to accurately use the data.

 

State Children’s Agency Background Characteristics

Tip: Consent Decree
A consent decree is a settlement from a court order. Although a consent decree may apply to multiple situations, in child welfare a consent decree often results in the courts requiring child welfare systems to comply with specific service delivery requirements. The court maintains oversight of the agency’s performance in these required areas.

Demographics of Children in Out-of-Home Placements

Tip: Out-of-Home Placement
Children in out-of-home placement have been removed from their biological family home and are in the care of the child welfare system. Out-of-home placements include foster homes, kinship homes, and residential care settings.

State’s Enhanced Models of Service Delivery in Foster Care

Tip: Enhanced Foster Care
Enhanced foster care is a generic term for the diverse range of enhanced, intensive, specialized, and/or therapeutic models of foster care.

Tip: Kinship Foster Care
“Kinship care is the full-time care, nurturing and protection of children by relatives, members of their tribes or clans, godparents, stepparents, or any adult who has a kinship bond with a child. This definition is designed to be inclusive and respectful of cultural values and ties of affection. It allows a child to grow to adulthood in a family environment.” [Source: http://www.cwla.org/programs/kinship/factsheet.htm]

Tip: Congregate Care
Congregate care describes placement settings for children in the child welfare system not living in foster homes or kinship homes; it includes group homes, residential treatment centers, and institutions.

Medicaid-Funded Programs Utilized by Children in Foster Care

Tip: Managed Care Enrollment
Managed care enrollment is a health service financing and delivery model in which Medicaid-eligible populations, possibly including children in foster care, receive health services through a health plan that often receives capitated payment arrangements.

Tip: Behavioral Health Carve Out
Behavioral health carve out is a health service financing and delivery model in which mental health and substance abuse treatment services are provided by a vendor outside of the usual provider.

Tip: 1915i HCBS Program
The 1915i HCBS Program is a Medicaid state plan option that allows states to offer home- and community-based services to individuals who otherwise would need an institutional level of care.

Tip: Title IV-E
Title IV-E of the Social Security Act provides states (tribes and identified territories) reimbursement from the federal government to help meet costs of providing services to children in foster care, transitional independent living and adoption assistance for children with special needs. States must meet specific eligibility requirements of Title IV-E to receive these funds. These include reimbursement for care of children in foster care, pre-adoptive homes, and institutions; administration of foster care services; training for staff, foster parents and adoptive parents.
(Source: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/OP_Home/ssact/title04/0400.htm)

Tip: Private Nonmedical Institutions (PNMI)
Private Nonmedical Institutions (PNMI) provide residential child care as part of the state’s Medicaid program. The facilities provide treatment for children and adolescents and families to help children return to their homes and communities whenever possible and appropriate.

Tip:  Rehabilitation Option
Rehabilitation (or rehab) option provides for coverage of services for the maximum reduction of disability and restoration of function. States can identify specific codes for services for children in foster care.

Child Welfare Revenue and Expenditures

Tip: Title IV-E
Title IV-E of the Social Security Act provides states (tribes and identified territories) reimbursement from the federal government to help meet costs of providing services to children in foster care, transitional independent living and adoption assistance for children with special needs. States must meet specific eligibility requirements of Title IV-E to receive these funds. These include reimbursement for care of children in foster care, pre-adoptive homes, and institutions; administration of foster care services; training for staff, foster parents and adoptive parents.
(Source: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/OP_Home/ssact/title04/0400.htm)

Tip: Title IV-B
Title IV-B of the Social Security Act provides funding to states (tribes and identified territories) for provision of services to children and families. Under IV-B 1 it includes funds to support, preserve or reunite children with their families and under Title IV-B it includes funds for family support, family preservation, time limited family reunification, adoption promotion and support.
(Source: http://www.napcwa.org/Home/docs/CRS_IV-Breport-6-13-2011-R41860.pdf)

Tip: SACWIS
SACWIS refers to the Statewide Automated Child Welfare Information System, which was a federal funding project offered to states. It began in 1993 and reimbursed states 50–75% of their costs for creating an automated data and case management system to help them better collect information and manage workload.

Tip:  MSIS
The Medicaid Statistical Information System (MSIS), the source for this data, is the federal CMS data system to which states submit Medicaid claims and eligibility data.

Tip:  Targeted Case Management
The provision of case management services to specific groups of Medicaid clients, designed to provide clients with needed services while promoting the cost-effective use of community resources.

Tip:  Rehabilitation
Rehabilitation (or rehab option) provides for coverage of services for the maximum reduction of disability and restoration of function.

Foster Care Permanency Outcomes

Children in Foster Care Well-Being Outcomes Assessed by State in Addition to CSFR Measures

State Key Initiatives and Innovative Programs or Practices in Foster Care