Category: SSW Media Features

Dean and Professor Gail Steketee Quoted in Martha Stewart Living Magazine

May 7th, 2014 in Homepage, SSW Headlines, SSW In the News, SSW Media Features

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Boston University School of Social Work Dean and Professor Gail Steketee, PhD, was recently interviewed for an article by Miranda Silva in Martha Stewart Living. “For the Love of Lightening Up” discusses the benefits of relinquishing goods while honoring happy memories.

Steketee acknowledges the various reasons people decide to hold on to things. “Sometimes it’s just simply joy or aesthetics – there’s pleasure in seeing an object,” she explains in the article. “But often nostalgia, guilt, and anxiety play a role.”

To combat the clutter buildup, Steketee suggests a thorough examination of the reasons for holding onto an item. If it is a struggle to justify keeping something, or it is kept out of mere obligation, it is time to let it go. Further, she reminds readers of the benefits of finding a good home for their cherished items. “The good feeling that comes from donating helps counter any guilt,” Steketee explains.

The complete article and further information about the emotional and physical ramifications of clutter buildup can be found in the How-To Handbook section of the April 2014 issue of Martha Stewart Living.

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AHSR Registration Now Open!

May 1st, 2014 in Homepage, SSW Headlines, SSW In the News, SSW Media Features, SSW News Releases

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Registration is now open for the 2014 Addiction Health Services Research (AHSR) Conference. The theme of this year’s conference is, “Research on integrating addiction, mental health and medical care services,” and posters, oral presentations and symposia are now being accepted.

The conference will be held in the heart of Boston, Massachusetts, at the Hyatt Boston Harbor on October 15-17, 2014.

To learn more about the conference and to register, please visit the AHSR 2014 website: http://sites.bu.edu/ahsr2014/.

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“Hubie Jones On the Record” Published in the Boston Globe

March 25th, 2014 in Homepage, SSW Headlines, SSW In the News, SSW Media Features, SSW News Releases

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Today, an article titled, “Hubie Jones On the Record,” was published in the Boston Globe. The piece highlighted SSW Dean Emeritus Hubie Jones as a civic activist and educator, and prominently featured the oral history project begun by Clinical Professor Betty J. Ruth and Associate Dean for Enrollment Services & External Relations Ken Schulman. To read the full article, click here. See an excerpt about the project below:

“The bottom line is he started or cofounded more than two dozen organizations himself, and they’re all still doing well,” said Betty J. Ruth, a Boston University social work professor who, along with her husband, Ken Schulman, has commissioned the oral history of Jones’s life.

 

Ruth and Schulman have no firm plans yet for Jones’s recordings, other than turning them into a written record of his life at some point. “Hubie’s impact has been profound, both within social work and beyond, and while he’s gotten some recognition for his work,” Ruth said, “I’m not sure anyone has unpacked the specific ingredients that made his leadership so successful and transformative.”

President Obama Announces BUSSW Alum Douglas M. Brooks, MSW, as Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy

March 24th, 2014 in Homepage, SSW Headlines, SSW In the News, SSW Media Features, SSW News Releases

WASHINGTON, DC – Today, President Obama announced the appointment of Douglas M. Brooks, MSW, as the Director of the White House Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP). A leading HIV/AIDS policy expert, Douglas most recently served as Senior Vice President for Community, Health, and Public Policy at the Justice Resource Institute (JRI).  As the Director of ONAP, he will lead the Administration’s work to reduce new HIV infections, improve health outcomes for people living with HIV, and eliminate HIV health disparities in the United States.

“Douglas’s policy expertise combined with his extensive experience working in the community makes him uniquely suited to the task of helping to achieve the goal of an AIDS-free generation, which is within our reach,” President Obama said.  “I look forward to having him lead our efforts from the White House.”

A component of the White House Domestic Policy Council, ONAP coordinates the ongoing implementation of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy  and the HIV Care Continuum initiative, while working together with public and private partners to advance the federal response to HIV/AIDS. ONAP also works with the White House National Security Council,  the State Department’s Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator, and international bodies to ensure that America’s response to the global pandemic is fully integrated with prevention, care, and treatment efforts around the world. Through the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) initiative, the U.S. has made enormous progress in responding to the global HIV/AIDS pandemic, working with countries heavily impacted by HIV/AIDS to help expand access to treatment, care, and prevention.

Brooks, a person living with HIV, was most recently the Senior Vice President for Community, Health, and Public Policy at JRI, a health and human service agency based in Boston. He served as executive director of the Sidney Borum Jr. Community Health Center at JRI, has managed programs in urban and rural environments and has served as a consultant to domestic and international governments and non-governmental organizations assisting their efforts  to serve populations living with and at greatest risk for HIV/AIDS. Brooks was a Visiting Fellow at the McCormack School Center for Social Policy at the University of Massachusetts, Boston and was Chair of the Board of Trustees of AIDS United in Washington, DC.

In 2010, Brooks was appointed to the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS (PACHA) and served as its liaison to the CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee and successfully led those bodies to achieve the tasks assigned to them in the National HIV/AIDS Strategy. He has directly managed federally funded programs, meeting or exceeding targets for Ryan White projects, CDC Prevention for African American/Black youth, a HRSA Special Project of National Significance (SPNS), and a HOPWA SPNS. Brooks received a Master of Social Work degree from Boston University and is a licensed clinical social worker.

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Synergy of Social Justice and Public Health: Dr. Troutman Offers High Praise

September 6th, 2013 in Homepage, SSW Headlines, SSW In the News, SSW Media Features, SSW News Releases

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(L-R) Dean Emeritus Hubie Jones laughs with Dr. Adewale Troutman

“I love talking to social workers because you guys get it. You understand it, you live it, you breath it. You understand all the implications of societal forces on issues that you work on,” said Dr. Adewale Troutman, president of the American Public Health Association. A human rights, health equity, and social justice activist, Troutman was the keynote speaker at the Second Annual Hubie Jones Lecture in Urban Health, held April 27, 2013. He opened by speaking about his childhood growing up in the South Bronx.

“We were so poor. True to our urban environment, there was very little green space; we used public transportation; and we were surrounded by domestic violence, alcoholism, abandonment, poverty and racial tension,” he described.

Troutman discussed his involvement in the civil rights movement, which fueled his interest in equity and justice. “I thought I could change the world. And I still do. I believe the power of one is extremely important: the opportunity to do what you can do can in fact make a difference in the world,” he said.

Troutman identifies himself through his commitment to social justice, human rights, community activism, health equity and national and global health. His life’s work has been a testimony to this fact. Troutman has over 40 years of dedicated practice through action to the principles of universal freedoms, and the elimination of racism, injustice and oppression. His experience includes special consultancies with the World Health Organization in Thailand and Japan, health assessment missions in Angola, Jamaica and Zaire, and training in India and Austria. His commitment to justice has evolved into his nationally recognized efforts to create health equity and the supremacy of the social determinants of health, the founding of the first Center for Health Equity at a local health department, and the creation of the Mayors Healthy Hometown Movement. He is also credited with the passage of one of the strongest anti-smoking ordinances in the country.

Encouraging the collaboration between public health and social work, Troutman applauded the public health social work dual degree program at Boston University. “An MSW/MPH is a direction we should all be taking — prevention is a guiding light,” he said.

In his presentation, Troutman spoke of reframing the following:

  • Health vs. Healthcare
  • Individual vs. Population Health
  • Market Justice vs. Social Justice
  • Rights vs. Privileges
  • Biological/Behavioral Determinants vs. Social Determinants
  • Creating Health Equity vs. Eliminating Health

“Social justice says societal factors affect what happens it us as individuals and populations. It needs to be part of the equation for us to understand what we need to do,” said Troutman.

Emphasizing equality, Troutman shared different case studies surrounding community health initiatives and discussed health policy. He also encouraged the audience to engage the medical community, identify non-traditional partners in the community, and recognize the importance of empowerment and capacity.

“We are all connected in public health, and it is our responsibility to continue to fight for policies and resources that create opportunities for people to live healthily and prosper,” he said. “You can’t have anything without a vision. We talk a lot about health equity and social justice, but how often do we visualize that? It takes a risk.”

Troutman closed by sharing the following poem:

To laugh is to risk appearing the fool
To weep is to risk appearing sentimental
To reach out to others is to risk involvement
To expose feelings is to risk exposing your true self
To place your ideas, your dreams before a crowd is to risk their loss
To love is to risk not being loved in return
To live is to risk dying
To hope is to risk despair
To try is to risk failure
But risks must be taken, because the greatest hazard in life is to risk nothing.

The person who risks nothing, does nothing, has nothing, and is nothing.
They may avoid suffering and sorrow, but they cannot learn, feel, change, grow, love, live.
Chained by their servitude, they are a slave, they forfeited their freedom.

Only the person who risks is free.

 

About Dr. Adewale Troutman
Dr. Troutman has a Doctor of Medicine from New Jersey Medical School, a master’s in Public Health from Columbia University, a master’s in Black Studies from the State University of New York in Albany, and board certification from the National Board of Public Health Examiners. His career has included clinical emergency medicine, hospital administration, academic, and public health practice. He served as an Associate Professor at the University of Louisville’s School of Public Health & Information Sciences, while directing the Metro-Louisville Department of Public Health & Wellness.

Troutman has had multiple publications including “What if We Were Equal?,” co-authored with former Surgeon General and Assistant Secretary of Health Dr. David Satcher; and numerous awards and recognitions. He is featured in the nationally televised PBS series Unnatural Causes: Is Inequality Making Us Sick? Troutman also serves on a variety of boards including the National Board of Public Health Examiners, the Health & Human Services Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Health Promotion Disease & the Committee on Infant Mortality, the Board of Directors of Public Health Law and Policy, the Executive Board of the American Public Health Association, the African American Heritage Center and is an active member of the Black Caucus of Health Workers (BCHW) and he has also served as a former BCHW President.

About the Hubie Jones Lecture on Urban Health
Wrapping up the month of Global Days of Service 2013, the endowed lecture is an annual symposium addressing vexing health issues distinct to the urban context featuring prominent national and international leaders toiling at the intersection of health and social justice. The series honors the vision of Hubie Jones, dean emeritus of Boston University’s School of Social Work, who inspired and shaped the School’s urban mission during his 16-year tenure and who continues to influence and define the social and civic landscape of Boston as a leader, bridge-builder, and advocate.

A Message About the Boston Marathon Bombing

April 23rd, 2013 in Homepage, SSW Headlines, SSW Media Features, Uncategorized

Starting with the horrific bombings at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, the last week has been difficult for all of us, as we have been touched by the tragedy, fear, and uncertainty caused by terrorism. We have grieved for all those killed and injured by these acts—they and their families are in our hearts.

We’d like to express our sincere appreciation to the first responders, law enforcement, medical personnel, caregivers, and the MA National Guard/Reserve, and thank them for extending their extraordinary skill and boundless compassion to save lives and comfort families and friends in their loss. We are profoundly grateful for these acts of service.

As you return to work and school after an extremely difficult week, we want to share the following thoughts and resources.

Please call us if we can be helpful in navigating your own emotional responses, supporting your work with your clients, or other concerns that may have arisen due to the bombings and their aftermath.

We hope that you feel well equipped to help others make sense of their automatic reactions, and to be forgiving and gentle with themselves as we all heal. The meaning and worldview questions also will be very individual and will evolve, and may be influenced by what we learn about the motivations of the perpetrators.

Below are a few resources that may be of assistance as we recover together; we hope they are helpful:

National Center for PTSD
Resources for survivors and the public following sudden trauma
http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/survivors_disaster.asp

National Child Traumatic Stress Network
http://www.nctsnet.org/
Psychological First Aid Guide

Zero to Three, Inc.
Resources for parents and providers of very young children
http://zerotothree.org/

Massachusetts Office for Victim Assistance (MOVA)
Marathon Bombings FAQ for Victims

Self-Care Toolkit
Developing Your Maintenance Self-Care Plan, University at Buffalo School of Social Work

We hope you are all doing as well as can be expected, and are taking care of yourselves and your loved ones.

**Note:  We will continue to update this page with resources.

The School of Social Work Announces the Second Annual Hubie Jones Lecture in Urban Health

February 25th, 2013 in Homepage, SSW Headlines, SSW Media Features, SSW News Releases

Dr. Adewale Troutman

Dr. Adewale Troutman

Wrapping up the month of Global Days of Service 2013, the Boston University School of Social Work is proud to announce the Second Annual Hubie Jones Lecture in Urban Health, featuring human rights, health equity, social justice activist and President of the American Public Health Association, Dr. Adewale Troutman.

Date/Time: April 27, 2013, 10–11:30 a.m.
Location: School of Management Auditorium, 595 Commonwealth Ave.
Price: While this event is complimentary, advance registration is recommended as space is limited.

Dr. Troutman has over 40 years of dedicated practice through action to the principles of universal freedoms and the elimination of racism, injustice and oppression. His experience includes special consultancies with the World Health Organization in Thailand and Japan, health assessment missions in Angola, Jamaica and Zaire, and training in India and Austria. His commitment to justice has evolved into his nationally recognized efforts to create health equity and the supremacy of the social determinants of health, the founding of the first Center for Health Equity at a local health department, and the creation of the Mayors Healthy Hometown Movement. He is also credited with the passage of one of the strongest anti-smoking ordinances in the country.

His unique educational background has been a major factor in the quest to eliminate racism and injustice – Dr. Troutman has a Doctor of Medicine from New Jersey Medical School, a Masters in Public Health from Columbia University, a Masters in Black Studies from the State University of New York in Albany, and board certification from the National Board of Public Health Examiners. His career has included clinical emergency medicine, hospital administration, academic, and public health practice. He served as an Associate Professor at the University of Louisville’s School of Public Health & Information Sciences while directing the Metro-Louisville Department of Public Health & Wellness.

Dr. Troutman has had multiple publications including What if We Were Equal? co-authored with former Surgeon General and Assistant Secretary of Health, Dr. David Satcher; and numerous awards and recognitions. He is featured in the nationally televised PBS series Unnatural Causes: Is Inequality Making Us Sick? Dr. Troutman also serves on a variety of boards including the National Board of Public Health Examiners, the Health & Human Services Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Health Promotion Disease & the Committee on Infant Mortality, the Board of Directors of Public Health Law and Policy, the Executive Board of the American Public Health Association, the African American Heritage Center and is an active member of the Black Caucus of Health Workers (BCHW) and he has also served as a former BCHW President.

To register for the event, visit the Boston University 2013 Global Day of Service website.

Dean Emeritus Hubie Jones

Dean Emeritus Hubie Jones

The lecture is a part of the School of Social Work’s annual Hubie Jones Lecture in Urban Health. The lecture series is an annual symposium addressing vexing health issues distinct to the urban context featuring prominent national and international leaders toiling at the intersection of health and social justice. The series honors the vision of Hubie Jones, dean emeritus of Boston University’s School of Social Work, who inspired and shaped the School’s urban mission during his 16-year tenure and who continues to influence and define the social and civic landscape of Boston as a leader, bridge-builder, and advocate.

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Associate Professor Hahm Accepted into Early Career Reviewer (ECR) Program at the National Institute of Health

December 11th, 2012 in Homepage, SSW Headlines, SSW Media Features

Associate Professor Hyeouk “Chris” Hahm has been accepted for participation in the prestigious Early Career Reviewer (ECR) program at the Center for Scientific Review (CSR), National Institute of Health. This program was developed to train qualified scientists without prior CSR review experience so that they may become effective reviewers; help emerging researchers advance their careers by exposing them to peer review; and enrich the existing pool of NIH reviewers by including scientists from less research-intensive institutions, as well as those from traditionally research- intensive institutions.

Dean, Post-Doctoral Fellow Publish “The Hoarding Handbook”

May 25th, 2011 in Homepage, SSW Headlines, SSW In the News, SSW Media Features, SSW News Releases

Hoarding_HandbookHoarding can be a debilitating, life-threatening problem and affects roughly five percent of the U.S. population. Currently categorized as a sub-type of obsessive compulsive disorder, hoarding is a distinct mental illness made up of three connected problems: collecting too many items; difficulty getting rid of items; and problems with organization.

Because very little research existed on hoarding prior to the 1990s, many human service professionals struggle with treating hoarding and those affected by it. Treatment requires multiple components, and professionals responding to hoarding situations must find the best way to combine them.

School of Social Work Dean Gail Steketee, post-doctoral fellow Christiana Bratiotis, and psychotherapist Cristina Sorrentino Schmalisch are working to rectify this problem. Their recent publication, The Hoarding Handbook: A Guide for Human Service Professionals, is a resource for those responding to hoarding situations.  This guide includes case studies, tips and strategies and suggestions for appropriate interventions.

Organized around the ways hoarding captures the attention of service providers, the handbook provides tools to help professionals assess the problem, coordinate and delegate tasks, and work directly with reluctant hoarders and others affected by the hoarding.

“There is some misunderstanding regarding hoarding, and often professionals don’t know enough about what the other professionals do when intervening with hoarding,” Bratiotis, who is also an adjunct faculty member at the School,  said. “Our goal was to write a book that is used by the many diverse disciplines that assist people with the problem.”

Multi-disciplinary task forces that address hoarding-specific problems have been formed in nearly 75 communities in the United States and Canada.  These task forces include members from a range of disciplines, including public health, housing, medical, mental health and animal control. The Hoarding Handbook is an outgrowth of Bratiotis’ dissertation and on-going research is this area, and it is the only current research in the U.S. that systematically examines hoarding task force efforts.

The Handbook’s third chapter, Working with Service Delivery Systems, covers how hoarding task forces are formed and includes a model for establishing a hoarding task force intervention.  Concentrating on intervention with non-voluntary cases of hoarding, the chapter focuses on using task forces as a coordinated community response mechanism that can facilitate practice and policy changes at organizational and community levels.

Steketee and Bratiotis are the principle investigator and director, respectively, of The School’s Hoarding Research Team, which also includes School of Social Work Assistant Professor Jordana Muroff and Boston University graduate and undergraduate students.  The team’s research activities include studying the nature of the problem of hoarding; individual, group and webcam cognitive behavioral treatment interventions and community task force responses to the problem.  In addition to these research activities, the team provides resource and referrals, professional training and family consultation.

- Jason L. London

Boston University Announces Online Master of Social Work Degree

April 27th, 2011 in Homepage, SSW Headlines, SSW In the News, SSW Media Features, SSW News Releases

The Boston University School of Social Work is pleased to announce a new online Master of Social Work (MSW) program in Clinical Social Work Practice. Taught by the School’s nationally recognized faculty, the online program will initially enroll human service professionals with a minimum of two years of supervised experience.

This part-time program can be completed in eight consecutive semesters and consists of taking courses online, participating in a single, extended field internship within the student’s geographic area, and attending a one-time, four-day residency component on the Boston University campus.

“This program is an excellent addition to the fine programs we offer at the School of Social Work,” Boston University School of Social Work Dean Gail Steketee said. “It continues the School’s commitment to educate outstanding social work practitioners in the community and for the community.”

The program focuses on clinical practice with individuals, families, and groups, with an integrated curriculum that emphasizes ethical practice, and social and economic justice. Courses are delivered with both asynchronous and synchronous (real-time) components, with each course lasting seven weeks. The 65-credit program allows individuals to earn an MSW degree while continuing to live and work in their own communities.

Tracing its beginnings back to 1937, the School of Social Work is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) and is ranked among the top 15 percent of graduate social work schools by U.S. News & World Report. Part of Boston University, the School is committed to producing social workers who possess excellent skills and the ability to practice within a variety of contexts, from clinical counseling to community-based settings.

Since 2001, Boston University has pioneered a trusted model of distance learning unparalleled in American higher education. Designed by the University’s Distance Education office in close partnership with distinguished University faculty, BU’s online programs bring the University’s groundbreaking research, academic innovation, and internationally renowned faculty to students situated around the globe.

Currently, more than 3,000 BU students tap into their full learning potential from a distance, using the latest interactive technology and online learning tools. A recipient of the Sloan Consortium’s Award for Excellence in Institution-Wide Online Education, Boston University’s online programs include 26 graduate-level degrees and certificates, three doctoral degrees, and a bachelor’s degree completion program. A number of non-credit certificates are also available.

Founded in 1839, Boston University is an internationally recognized private research university with more than 30,000 students participating in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. BU consists of 17 colleges and schools along with a number of multi-disciplinary centers and institutes which are central to the school’s research and teaching mission.

For more information on the School of Social Work’s online Master of Social Work, visit onlinemsw.bu.edu or speak to an admissions advisor at 877-308-9945.