Christopher J. Gill, MD

Associate Professor, Global Health
Christopher Gill
(617) 638-6584cgill@bu.edu
Crosstown Center – CT370
View full profile at BUMC

Biography

Christopher Gill has an MD from the University of Massachusetts Medical School and an MS from Tufts-Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Studies.Dr. Gill is an infectious disease specialist by training. From 2002-2008 he was a faculty member of the Department of Global Health at Boston University School of Public Health, engaged in a wide variety of clinical trials and investigations. His research interests have focused on child survival, and include diarrheal diseases, tuberculosis, pneumococcal and meningococcal disease, adherence to HIV medications, and neonatal survival. He was the principal investigator of the Lufwanyama Neonatal Survival Project in Northern Zambia (LUNESP), a prospective, cluster randomized and controlled effectiveness study designed to determine whether training traditional birth attendants to manage several common perinatal conditions could reduce neonatal mortality in the setting of a resource poor country with limited access to healthcare. The results demonstrated that training traditional birth attendants in neonatal resuscitation skills significantly reduces neonatal mortality by approximately 50%. From 2008-end of 2010 he was the Director of the Meningitis ACWY conjugate vaccine clinical trials group at Novartis Vaccines. There he was responsible for the design, implementation and analysis of Phase IIb, III and IV clinical trials in support of the vaccine, and played a key role in licensing this new vaccine in over 60 countries around the world, including the US. In 2011, he rejoined the faculty at the BU Center for Global Health and Development and the BU School of Public Health, working as the Director of the BUSPH Pharmaceuticals Program from 2011-15, teaching, mentoring, and conducting research in the areas of HIV medication adherence in China, advocacy around child mortality due to diarrhea and pneumonia, pertussis disease surveillance in Zambia, and capacity building of Vietnamese community health workers using SMS text messaging.

Education

  • University of Massachusetts Medical School, MD
  • Tufts University, MS
  • Tufts University, BS

Classes Taught

  • SPHGH702
  • SPHGH800
  • SPHIH941

Publications

  • Published on 12/15/2015

    Useem J, Brennan A, LaValley M, Vickery M, Ameli O, Reinen N, Gill CJ. Systematic Differences between Cochrane and Non-Cochrane Meta-Analyses on the Same Topic: A Matched Pair Analysis. PLoS One. 2015; 10(12):e0144980. PMID: 26671213.

    Read at: PubMed
  • Published on 11/1/2015

    Gill CJ, DeSilva MB, Hamer DH, Keyi X, Wilson IB, Sabin L. Novel Approaches for Visualizing and Analyzing Dose-Timing Data from Electronic Drug Monitors, or "How the 'Broken Window' Theory Pertains to ART Adherence". AIDS Behav. 2015 Nov; 19(11):2057-68. PMID: 25893658.

    Read at: PubMed
  • Published on 8/15/2015

    Sabin LL, Bachman DeSilva M, Gill CJ, Zhong L, Vian T, Xie W, Cheng F, Xu K, Lan G, Haberer JE, Bangsberg DR, Li Y, Lu H, Gifford AL. Improving Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy With Triggered Real-time Text Message Reminders: The China Adherence Through Technology Study. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2015 Aug 15; 69(5):551-9. PMID: 25886927.

    Read at: PubMed
  • Published on 5/5/2015

    McNabb M, Chukwu E, Ojo O, Shekhar N, Gill CJ, Salami H, Jega F. Assessment of the quality of antenatal care services provided by health workers using a mobile phone decision support application in northern Nigeria: a pre/post-intervention study. PLoS One. 2015; 10(5):e0123940. PMID: 25942018.

    Read at: PubMed
  • Published on 4/16/2015

    Gill CJ. Plasmodium vivax malaria in the UK. BMJ. 2015; 350:h1840. PMID: 25882444.

    Read at: PubMed
  • Published on 10/1/2014

    Waldorf B, Gill C, Crosby SS. Assessing adherence to accepted national guidelines for immigrant and refugee screening and vaccines in an urban primary care practice: a retrospective chart review. J Immigr Minor Health. 2014 Oct; 16(5):839-45. PMID: 23512323.

    Read at: PubMed
  • Published on 8/31/2014

    Gill CJ, MacLeod WB, Phiri-Mazala G, Guerina NG, Mirochnick M, Knapp AB, Hamer DH. Can traditional birth attendants be trained to accurately identify septic infants, initiate antibiotics, and refer in a rural African setting? Glob Health Sci Pract. 2014 Aug; 2(3):318-27. PMID: 25276591.

    Read at: PubMed
  • Published on 7/15/2014

    Saito H, Gill CJ. How frequently do the results from completed US clinical trials enter the public domain?--A statistical analysis of the ClinicalTrials.gov database. PLoS One. 2014; 9(7):e101826. PMID: 25025477.

    Read at: PubMed
  • Published on 9/23/2013

    Ginsburg AS, Tinkham L, Riley K, Kay NA, Klugman KP, Gill CJ. Antibiotic non-susceptibility among Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae isolates identified in African cohorts: a meta-analysis of three decades of published studies. Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2013 Dec; 42(6):482-91. PMID: 24139883.

    Read at: PubMed
  • Published on 7/16/2013

    Bachman Desilva M, Gifford AL, Keyi X, Li Z, Feng C, Brooks M, Harrold M, Yueying H, Gill CJ, Wubin X, Vian T, Haberer J, Bangsberg D, Sabin L. Feasibility and Acceptability of a Real-Time Adherence Device among HIV-Positive IDU Patients in China. AIDS Res Treat. 2013; 2013:957862. PMID: 23956851.

    Read at: PubMed

View 51 more publications:View full profile at BUMC

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