Social Science and Religion Network- Research, Funding, and Job Opportunities

 

FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

GLOBAL RELIGION RESEARCH INITIATIVE AWARDS

Deadline to apply: October 17, 2016 (DEADLINE APPROACHING!!!)

The Global Religion Research Initiative (GRRI) at the University of Notre Dame is a portfolio of six distinct competitive research and writing grants and fellowships programs to be awarded over the next three years worth $3.1 million that together intend to significantly advance the social scientific study of religions around the globe. The premise of the GRRI is that, as religion persists in significance in the contemporary, globalizing world, the social sciences in North America need much better to understand the diversity of religions and to integrate that enhanced understanding into research, theory, and teaching.

Awards include:

Dissertation Fellowships

Postdoctoral Research

Curriculum Development

International Collaboration

Project Launch Awards

Book Leave Awards

For more information on the Global Religion Research Initiative (GRRI) awards, visit http://grri.nd.edu/

 

LOUISVILLE INSTITUTE GRANTS, FELLOWSHIPS, AND AWARDS

1.) First Book Grant For Minority Scholars
Deadline: January 15, 2017

The First Book Grant for Minority Scholars (FBM) offers grants up to $40,000 to assist junior, non-tenured religion scholars of color to complete a major research project on an issue in North American Christianity related to the priorities of the Louisville Institute. Grant periods are typically one academic year in length.

For general information on the Louisville Institute awards, see http://louisville-institute.org/programs-grants-and-fellowships/grants/

2.) Dissertation Fellowship:
Deadline: February 1, 2017

The Dissertation Fellowship (DF) programs offers up to twelve $22,000 grants to support the final year of Ph.D. or Th.D. dissertation writing. Preference given to students engaged in research pertaining to North American Christianity, especially projects related to Institute mission priorities. This program is also open to outstanding students who may not intend to teach in theological education, but whose dissertation projects have the potential to strengthen the religious life of North American Christians and their institutions.

For more information, see http://louisville-institute.org/programs-grants-and-fellowships/fellowships/

3.) Doctoral Fellowship:
Deadline: March 1, 2017

The Doctoral Fellowship (DOC) program encourages current Ph.D./Th.D. students to consider theological education as their vocation. The Institute awards up to ten two-year Doctoral Fellowships of $2,000 per year. In addition, Fellows constitute a peer learning cohort that meets six times over a two year period.

For more information, see http://louisville-institute.org/programs-grants-and-fellowships/fellowships/

4.)Pastoral Study Project Award
Deadline: September 1, 2017

The Pastoral Study Project (PSP) awards pastoral leaders up to $15,000 to pursue a pressing question related to Christian life, faith, and ministry. Grants are available for study projects involving full or partial leave from job responsibilities.

For more information, see http://louisville-institute.org/programs-grants-and-fellowships/grants/

5.) Project Grant for Researchers
Deadline: October 1, 2017

The Project Grant for Researchers (PGR) supports research, reflection, and writing by academics and pastors concerning Christian faith and life, the practice of ministry, and/or religious institutions. Grants of up to $25,000 support a diverse range of projects that may involve independent study, consultations, or collaboration between pastors and academics. Preference given to projects that show potential to generate reliable new data through empirical methods of inquiry and discovery.

For more information, see http://louisville-institute.org/programs-grants-and-fellowships/grants/

6.) Sabbatical Grant for Researchers
Deadline: November 1, 2017

The Sabbatical Grant for Researchers (SGR) offers grants up to $40,000 to assist research and writing projects that will advance religious and theological scholarship in ways that also address practical issues concerning Christian faith and life, pastoral leadership, and/or religious institutions. Typically, applicants are fully employed in accredited academic institutions and eligible for up to a full academic year leave from teaching and administrative responsibilities.

For more information, see http://louisville-institute.org/programs-grants-and-fellowships/grants/

7.) Postdoctoral Fellowship:
Deadline: December 1, 2017

The Postdoctoral Fellowship (PostDoc) programs provides up to six awards of $25,000 each year (plus housing, health benefits, and moving benefits) to support a two-year teaching internship in a theological school. During this residency, Postdoctoral Fellows are accompanied by an academic mentor and a pastoral mentor. Fellows also constitute a peer learning cohort that meets a total of six times over two years.

For general information about the Louisville Institute awards, see http://louisville-institute.org/programs-grants-and-fellowships/

 

UPCOMING CALLS FOR PAPERS

2016 CONFERENCE ON MEDICINE AND RELIGION
“RE-ENCHANTING MEDICINE”
Call for Papers Deadline: Friday, September 30, 2016, 11:59:59 p.m. CST
Conference Date: March 24-26, 2017
JW Marriott Houston, TX

Call for Papers: We invite abstracts for 75-minute panel and workshop sessions, 15-minute paper presentations, and posters that address issues at the intersection of medicine and religion, including but not limited to the conference theme. We also invite student participation in an essay contest.

The fate of our times is characterized by rationalization and intellectualization and, above all, by the disenchantment of the world. –Max Weber, 1917

2017 marks the centennial of Max Weber’s lecture, “Science as Vocation,” in which he claimed that the modern world had lost its enchantment. Modern people, Weber argued, are socialized to see the world as merely material, without intrinsic meaning. This disenchantment leads modern cultures to treat nature, including human nature, as substance to be manipulated and controlled, using the latest scientific knowledge and technique, organized by bureaucracy and market forces.

The 2017 Conference on Medicine and Religion considers Weber’s analysis with respect to contemporary health care, and asks what it would look like to re-enchant medicine today?

In what sense is the world enchanted? Can the work of clinicians and medical scientists be described as a vocation or calling? If so, what is the nature of this call? Does Weber’s analysis clarify why so many health care practitioners feel like cogs in a machine? How can practitioners, patients and religious communities break through the intellectualization, rationalization, and disenchantment in an era of evidence-based medicine, quality metrics, and electronic medical records?

For detailed instructions, please visit: www.medicineandreligion.com

 

PRACTICAL MATTERS: A JOURNAL OF RELIGIOUS PRACTICES AND PRACTICAL THEOLOGY

For consideration in Issue 10: Wealth, Poverty, and Practice, submissions must be received by October 1, 2016

Practical Matters is now accepting submissions on religious practices and practical theology for 2016-2017. The journal will feature articles and multimedia projects on the theme of money, class, and religion. For more information, see the CfP at:

http://practicalmattersjournal.org/submissions/


UPCOMING CONFERENCES OF INTEREST

2nd ANNUAL BOSTON UNIVERSITY GRADUATE STUDENT CONFERENCE:
“PROTEST,  PUBLIC RELIGION, AND SOCIAL CHANGE
Boston University, Boston, MA

October 1, 2016

Boston University is pleased to announce its second annual Graduate Conference on Religious Studies, on the theme of “Protest, Public Religion, and Social Change.” In this contentious election year, we are frequently reminded of how religious commitments inform all sides of our public debates over what it means to be a just society. This conference draws on B.U.’s rich history of religious activism in pursuit of social justice as a starting point for a broader conversation about how a wide variety of religious traditions engage with changing societies. We invite papers that reflect on how religion manifests publicly in moments of social crisis, and how religious groups use texts, material culture, ritual, theologies, and philosophical traditions to effect or to resist social change.

For more information, see http://www.bu.edu/gdrs/files/2016/04/Boston-University-Graduate-Conference-on-Religious-Studies-2016.pdf

 

5th ANNUAL GRADUATE CONFERENCE ON RELIGION AT HARVARD DIVINITY SCHOOL:
“WAYS OF KNOWING 2016: RELIGION AND TIME”
Harvard University, Cambridge, MA

October 27-29, 2016

The Science, Religion, and Culture program at Harvard Divinity School announces the 5th annual “Ways of Knowing: Graduate Conference on Religion.” Inaugurated in 2012, this multi-day event is made up of thematic panels that cross religious traditions, academic disciplines, and intellectual and theological commitments. In addition, the conference features special panels on professionalization, addressing both academic and non-academic careers, and a keynote address. The conference aims at promoting lively interdisciplinary discussion of prevailing assumptions (both within and outside the academy) about the differentiation, organization, authorization, and reproduction of various modes of knowing and doing religion.

In keeping with the commemoration of the conference’s 5th anniversary and Harvard Divinity School’s 200th anniversary, the central theme for this year’s conference is “Religion and Time.” We take a capacious approach to understanding how human communities and religions have long engaged the question of time through multiply layered, richly differentiated and multifarious modalities and especially encourage papers that engage questions of time and religion. Papers might focus on religious archives and history; religious narratives about time; mythical, cyclical, linear conceptions of time in religious traditions; sacred and profane time; and religious pasts, presents and futures. Proposals might also interrogate the place of time in apocalyptic theologies and movements, scientific futures and the religious imagination, religious rituals and time, and methodological approaches to the study of time and religion. We welcome a broad range of papers that address the theme of religion and time from a range of methodological approaches and in the context of various religious traditions, historical periods, and geographical regions.

For more information, see http://projects.iq.harvard.edu/gradreligionconference/home

 

5th BIENNIAL CONFERENCE ON RELIGION AND AMERICAN CULTURE
Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN

June 1-4, 2017

A year from now, over one hundred scholars will gather in Indianapolis for the Fifth Biennial Conference on Religion and American Culture. This meeting has quickly gained a reputation as the “go-to” meeting for interdisciplinary conversations about the most important issues and topics in the study of religion in North America. We’re sending you this message so you can do four things in preparation for the meeting:

Mark your calendars for June 1-4, the dates for the next Biennial Conference.

Check out the provocative papers from previous meetings, available here.

Send us your ideas. We always gear this meeting to the most pressing issues and topics of the day. Have thoughts? Send them to us at raac@iupui.edu.

For more information, see http://raac.iupui.edu/meetings-conferences/biennial-conference-religion-and-american-culture/

 

JOB OPPORTUNITIES

Visiting Assistant Professor of Women, Gender and Sexuality and International and Area Programs
Kalamazoo College
Religion Department
For more information, see https://reason.kzoo.edu/provost/facultyjobs/WGS/

People
Events
Courses

For more information, contact Prof. Nancy Ammerman.