News

Reassuring news about flu vaccine safety in pregnancy

September 25th, 2013 in Pregnancy Health Interview Study News.

A new study has found “reassuring” evidence that H1N1 flu vaccine is safe during pregnancy.  The national study was launched shortly after the H1N1 outbreak in 2009 and was led by Boston University and UC San Diego in collaboration with the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology.

Read more at CBS Boston

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Boston University, in collaboration with the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), have found evidence of the H1N1 influenza vaccine’s safety during pregnancy. The national study, which was launched shortly after the H1N1 influenza outbreak of 2009, is summarized in two companion papers published online on September 19 in the journal Vaccine.

Read more at UC San Diego Health System

Some painkillers tied to certain birth defects in study

September 12th, 2013 in Pregnancy Health Interview Study News.

Women taking prescription painkillers such as Oxycontin, Vicodin and Percocet early in pregnancy are twice as likely to give birth to babies with devastating neural tube defects such as spina bifida, a new study suggests.

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Overall and central obesity linked to delayed conception in African-American women, according to BU researchers

September 3rd, 2013 in Black Women's Health Study News.

In a first of its kind study, researchers from the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University found that African-American women who were overweight or obese had a greater risk of delayed conception and infertility when compared with women who were of normal weight. In addition, women who had larger waist circumferences and greater waist-to-hip ratios (i.e., apple-shaped women) had lower fertility. These findings of time to pregnancy (TTP) are published online in Human Reproduction.

Read more at Boston University Medical Campus

Racism linked to asthma risk for black women

August 22nd, 2013 in Black Women's Health Study News.

“Racism is a significant stressor in the lives of African-American women, and our results contribute to a growing body of evidence indicating that experiences of racism can have adverse effects on health,” says Patricia Coogan.

Read more at Futurity.org

BU researchers conduct innovative Internet-based fertility study

August 1st, 2013 in PRESTO News.

BU researchers are studying whether selected lifestyle factors can affect fertility, miscarriage and adverse birth outcomes over a 12-month period. PRESTO (PREgnancy STudy Online) is an innovative online fertility study funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and conducted by researchers at Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University and the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH).

Read more at Boston University Medical Campus

Decongestants in pregnancy linked to birth defects

July 23rd, 2013 in Pregnancy Health Interview Study News.

A woman’s use of decongestant medications in the first trimester of pregnancy may raise her child’s risk of certain rare birth defects, according to a small study.  Some types of over-the-counter decongestants, including the popular phenylephrine and pseudoephedrine, were individually linked to rare, specific birth defects of the digestive tract, ear, and heart.

Read more at Parent Herald

    Dr. Allen A. Mitchell receives highest honor from the National Birth Defects Prevention Network

    March 1st, 2013 in Pregnancy Health Interview Study News.

    Allen A. Mitchell, MD, a professor of public health (epidemiology) and professor of pediatrics at the Boston University Schools of Public Health and Medicine, recently received the Godfrey P. Oakley, Jr., Award at the annual meeting of the National Birth Defects Prevention Network. Mitchell, who is also the director of Boston University’s Slone Epidemiology Center , was recognized for his significant lifetime contributions to the field of birth defects.

    Read more at Phys.org

    Too many pills in pregnancy

    February 26th, 2013 in Pregnancy Health Interview Study News.

    The thalidomide disaster of the early 1960s left thousands of babies with deformed limbs because their mothers innocently took a sleeping pill thought to be safe during pregnancy.  In its well-publicized wake, countless pregnant women avoided all medications, fearing that any drug they took could jeopardize their babies’ development.

    Read more at The New York Times

    Exploring the causes of black women’s obesity

    November 29th, 2012 in Black Women's Health Study News.

    There are many reasons why people are obese. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which estimates that one-third of Americans are obese, attributes the epidemic to genes, diet, socioeconomic status, environment, and lifestyle, among other things. At BU, dozens of researchers are searching for a better understanding of the causes of, and for solutions to, a health problem associated with heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and certain types of cancer, and whose medical costs were $147 billion in 2008. In this four-part series, BU Today looks at their work in progress.

    Read more at BU Today

    Socioeconomic status linked to risk of obesity in African-American women

    June 13th, 2012 in Black Women's Health Study News.

    Socioeconomic status across one’s lifetime is related to weight gain and risk of obesity in African-American women, according to a new study led by researchers from BU’s Slone Epidemiology Center.

    Read more at The Insider (BUSPH)