Category: Black Women’s Health Study News

Study finds experiences of racism associated with weight gain in African American women

March 5th, 2014 in Black Women's Health Study News

A recent analysis conducted by investigators from the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University has found that frequent experiences of racism were associated with a higher risk of obesity among African American women.

Read more at Medical Xpress

Depressive symptoms linked to adult-onset asthma in African-American women

January 24th, 2014 in Black Women's Health Study News

According to a new study from the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University, African-American women who reported high levels of depressive symptoms had a greater likelihood of adult-onset asthma compared to women who reported fewer depressive symptoms.

Read more at Medical Xpress

What burgers might have to do with African American women’s obesity risk

December 16th, 2013 in Black Women's Health Study News

Researchers from the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University found an association between eating burgers from restaurants twice a week or more and having a 26 percent higher risk of becoming obese over an approximately 15-year period, among African American women.

Read more at The Huffington Post

Overall and central obesity linked to delayed conception in African-American women, according to BU researchers

September 3rd, 2013 in Black Women's Health Study News

In a first of its kind study, researchers from the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University found that African-American women who were overweight or obese had a greater risk of delayed conception and infertility when compared with women who were of normal weight. In addition, women who had larger waist circumferences and greater waist-to-hip ratios (i.e., apple-shaped women) had lower fertility. These findings of time to pregnancy (TTP) are published online in Human Reproduction.

Read more at Boston University Medical Campus

Racism linked to asthma risk for black women

August 22nd, 2013 in Black Women's Health Study News

“Racism is a significant stressor in the lives of African-American women, and our results contribute to a growing body of evidence indicating that experiences of racism can have adverse effects on health,” says Patricia Coogan.

Read more at Futurity.org

Exploring the causes of black women’s obesity

November 29th, 2012 in Black Women's Health Study News

There are many reasons why people are obese. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which estimates that one-third of Americans are obese, attributes the epidemic to genes, diet, socioeconomic status, environment, and lifestyle, among other things. At BU, dozens of researchers are searching for a better understanding of the causes of, and for solutions to, a health problem associated with heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, and certain types of cancer, and whose medical costs were $147 billion in 2008. In this four-part series, BU Today looks at their work in progress.

Read more at BU Today

Socioeconomic status linked to risk of obesity in African-American women

June 13th, 2012 in Black Women's Health Study News

Socioeconomic status across one’s lifetime is related to weight gain and risk of obesity in African-American women, according to a new study led by researchers from BU’s Slone Epidemiology Center.

Read more at The Insider (BUSPH)

BU takes on cancer: racial disparities

April 9th, 2012 in Black Women's Health Study News

When epidemiologists Julie Palmer and Lynn Rosenberg launched the Black Women’s Health Study in the early 1990s, they could state with confidence the number of long-term health studies of African American women previously undertaken: zero. While it was clear that black women have higher rates of breast cancer at young ages, as well as a greater incidence of many illnesses, such as hypertension, diabetes, stroke, and lupus, scientists could only guess at the reasons.

Read more at BU Today

Yvette Cozier, DSc, discusses diabetes in African American women with playwright Robbie McCauley on ArtsEmerson

January 17th, 2012 in Black Women's Health Study News

There are two kinds of sugar. There’s Sam Cooke’s kind, the one he sings about in the great 1965 song, “Sugar Dumpling.” It’s sweet. It’s soul food. It’s love. It’s everything good about being alive.

Then there’s Robbie McCauley’s sugar. The deadly kind. The kind behind a diabetes epidemic that affects almost 20 percent of adult African-Americans, twice as many as the general population. The kind that makes diabetes the fourth-leading cause of death among blacks.

Listen at Radio Boston (WBUR)

Study finds air pollution linked to increased incidence of diabetes and hypertension in African American women

January 5th, 2012 in Black Women's Health Study News

The incidence of type 2 diabetes and hypertension increases with cumulative levels of exposure to nitrogen oxides, according to a new study led by researchers from the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University.

Read more at Boston University Medical Campus