Category: Black Women’s Health Study News

Yvette Cozier, DSc, discusses diabetes in African American women with playwright Robbie McCauley on ArtsEmerson

January 17th, 2012 in Black Women's Health Study News

There are two kinds of sugar. There’s Sam Cooke’s kind, the one he sings about in the great 1965 song, “Sugar Dumpling.” It’s sweet. It’s soul food. It’s love. It’s everything good about being alive.

Then there’s Robbie McCauley’s sugar. The deadly kind. The kind behind a diabetes epidemic that affects almost 20 percent of adult African-Americans, twice as many as the general population. The kind that makes diabetes the fourth-leading cause of death among blacks.

Listen at Radio Boston (WBUR)

Study finds air pollution linked to increased incidence of diabetes and hypertension in African American women

January 5th, 2012 in Black Women's Health Study News

The incidence of type 2 diabetes and hypertension increases with cumulative levels of exposure to nitrogen oxides, according to a new study led by researchers from the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University.

Read more at Boston University Medical Campus

Patricia Coogan, ScD, awarded two NIH grants

December 22nd, 2011 in Black Women's Health Study News

Patricia F. Coogan, ScD, an associate professor of epidemiology at Boston University’s Slone Epidemiology Center, recently was awarded funding for two grants from the National Institutes of Health. The first is a five-year grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences that will study air pollution and risk of incident hypertension and diabetes in African American women. The second award is for a three-year study on the psychosocial factors and the risk of incident asthma in African American women, funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

Read more at Boston University Medical Campus

BWHS research featured in Fall 2011 issue of Boston University School of Medicine: Campus & Alumni News

October 1st, 2011 in Black Women's Health Study News

New genetic risk factors of systemic lupus erythematosus found in study of African American women

Researchers from Boston University’s Slone Epidemiology Center have found four new genetic variants in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) that confer a higher risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (“lupus”) in African American women.

Aetna Foundation supports study of obesity among African American women

As part of a $1 million funding program, the Aetna Foundation has provided a $233,000 grant to Boston University’s Slone Epidemiology Center for a two-year study of factors that influence obesity among African American women — including both individual and neighborhood-level factors — and the identification of the most effective small changes individuals can make to decrease obesity rates among African American women.

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Boston University School of Medicine: Campus & Alumni News (Fall 2011)

Breast-feeding may reduce risk of certain cancer

August 29th, 2011 in Black Women's Health Study News

Having multiple children is generally thought to reduce the risk of breast cancer in women. But African-American women who give birth to two or more children have about a 50 percent greater chance than those who have no children at all of developing a kind of aggressive breast cancer, which is characterized by the absence of estrogen or progesterone receptors.

Read more at Boston.com

Investigating breast cancer disparities among African-American women

August 25th, 2011 in Black Women's Health Study News

Why are African-American women more likely than those of European descent to be diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age, and with poor prognoses? It’s a provocative question, and one that a multidisciplinary team from the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University (BU), the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center (UNC) and Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) are coming together to address, supported by a five-year, $19.3 million award from the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

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Boston University identifies contributors to high breast cancer incidence in African-American women

August 17th, 2011 in Black Women's Health Study News

Researchers at Boston University’s Slone Epidemiology Center have uncovered new evidence that might explain why African-American women have a disproportionately higher risk of developing more aggressive and difficult-to-treat forms of breast cancer.

Read more at Huffington Post

PHIS and BWHS featured in the 2010 issue of Research at Boston University

December 1st, 2010 in Black Women's Health Study News, Pregnancy Health Interview Study News

Safety in numbers

When the thalidomide tragedy of the 1960s revolutionized the drug regulatory system in the United States and elsewhere, the only group that did not benefit from the new safety net was the same group devastated by thalidomide’s destructive effects: pregnant women and their babies.

Location is everything

African American women who live in low income neighborhoods have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than do African Americans who live in more advantaged neighborhoods — even if they have high educational levels themselves.

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Research at Boston University (2010)

Collards and carrots may ward off breast cancer

October 21st, 2010 in Black Women's Health Study News

Eating lots of carrots and cruciferous vegetables — collard greens, cabbage, broccoli — could reduce breast cancer risk, particularly an aggressive form common among African American women, suggests a large new study.

Read more at Reuters

What we’re doing right

October 14th, 2010 in Black Women's Health Study News

Here are the real numbers on what the 59,000 women in the Black Women’s Health Study (BWHS) are doing to cut their health risks across the board.

Read more at Heart & Soul