Category: Black Women’s Health Study News

Moderate drinking lessens risk for lupus among black women

September 7th, 2018 in Black Women's Health Study News

Among black women, consuming four or more alcoholic drinks per week is associated with a significant decrease in the risk for systemic lupus erythematosus, while cigarette smoking was linked to a nonsignificant increase in the risk for the disease, according to data published in Arthritis Care & Research.

Read more at Healio

Researcher studying ways to reduce health disparities for Black women dealing with insomnia

December 6th, 2017 in Black Women's Health Study News

Black women are among those most likely to have insomnia, according to Lynn Rosenberg, ScD, associate director of Boston University’s Slone Epidemiology Center and a principal investigator of the Black Women’s Health Study (BWHS). Rosenberg has been awarded a three-year $2,225,495 grant from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to study this. The study will be using a self-administered internet program called SHUTi (Sleep Healthy Using the Internet), a web-tool based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).

Read more at Boston University School of Medicine

African-American women with type 2 diabetes may have higher risk for ER-neg breast cancer

November 15th, 2017 in Black Women's Health Study News

Among African-American women, those with type 2 diabetes may have a higher risk of developing estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer.

Read more at MedicalXpress

Dr. Julie Palmer awarded AACR Distinguished Lecture on the Science of Cancer Health Disparities, funded by Susan G. Komen®

September 26th, 2017 in Black Women's Health Study News

This award honors an investigator whose novel and significant work has had or may have a far-reaching impact on the etiology, detection, diagnosis, treatment or prevention of cancer health disparities.

Read more at:

Too many black women die from breast cancer. Why? BU Slone Epidemiology Center researchers look for answers

April 27th, 2017 in Black Women's Health Study News

Breast cancer is not color-blind. Although it strikes women (and less commonly, men) of every age and race, black women are more likely than white women to die of breast cancer. Why?

Read more at BU Today

Researchers identify breast cancer risk factors for younger black women

October 21st, 2016 in Black Women's Health Study News

Black women under the age of 45 are at increased risk for an aggressive form of breast cancer [estrogen receptor (ER) negative] if they experienced a high number of pregnancies, never breast fed, and/or had higher waist-to-hip ratio.

Read more at BU School of Medicine

Seeking better understanding of breast cancer in African American women

July 25th, 2016 in Black Women's Health Study News

Why do African American women die at higher rates from breast cancer and experience more aggressive breast tumors than white women?

School of Public Health researchers affiliated with the Slone Epidemiology Center (SEC) have received funding from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to explore this question. The new grant is based on the premise that having a better understanding of the biology of breast cancer in African American women will lead to better prevention and treatment.

Read more at BU School of Public Health

BU researcher awarded grant to better understand breast cancer

July 7th, 2016 in Black Women's Health Study News

Why do African-American women die at a higher rate and experience more aggressive breast tumors than white women? Researchers from Boston University’s Slone Epidemiology Center (SEC) have received funding from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to explore this question. The new grant is based on the premise that having a better understanding of the biology of breast cancer in African-American women will lead to better prevention and treatment.

Read more at EurekAlert!

Black women with fibroids face elevated risk of endometrial cancer

April 1st, 2016 in Black Women's Health Study News

Black women with a history of uterine fibroids had a 40 percent higher risk of endometrial cancer, according to a study led by School of Public Health researchers with the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University.

Read more at BU School of Public Health

Female hormone supplements with estrogen and progestin linked to breast cancer risk

December 1st, 2015 in Black Women's Health Study News

Postmenopausal African American women who use female hormone supplements containing estrogen and progestin (“combination” therapy) are at an increased risk for estrogen receptor positive breast cancer.

Read more at EurekAlert