Contact Info
Phone: 617-353-3280
Email: dietiker@bu.edu

Educational History

  • Ph.D. in Mathematics Education, Michigan State University
  • B.S. in Mathematics, California State University, San Luis Obispo

Profile

Dr. Leslie Dietiker is an assistant professor of Mathematics Education at Boston University where she is part of the Arts and Science Education cluster. She currently teaches mathematics and pedagogy to future high school mathematics teachers. Prior to coming to BU, Dr. Dietiker taught high school mathematics and computer science at a public high school in San Francisco, CA for 17 years and received National Board Certification. While teaching she co-authored seven textbooks for grades 6-12 with the non-profit CPM Educational Program and served as Director of Curriculum, including Algebra Connections and Geometry Connections. Dr. Dietiker’s research focuses on the theory of curriculum, particularly with regards to its aesthetics and structural dimensions. Other areas of professional interest include supporting teacher curricular work, such as ways to use textual materials and plan lessons. Her current grant, entitled Characteristics of Interesting Mathematics Lessons (funded by the William T. Grant Foundation), is focused on learning how the mathematical plots of algebra lessons that students indicate are interesting differ from those that are not characterized as interesting by students.

Courses Taught

  • SED ME 559: Mathematics for Teachers: Geometry
  • SED ME 547: Methods of Teaching Mathematics: High School

Selected Publications

  • Dietiker, L. (in progress). What’s the story? A framework for the interrogation of mathematics curriculum.
  • Dietiker, L., & Brakoniecki, A. (in progress). Reading geometrically: The negotiation of expected meaning of diagrams in math textbooks.
  • Dietiker, L. (2013). Mathematics texts as narrative: Rethinking curriculum. For the Learning of Mathematics, 33(3), 14–19.
  • Smith, J. P., Males, L. M., Dietiker, L. C., Lee, K., & Mosier, A. (2013). Curricular Treatments of Length Measurement in the United States: Do They Address Known Learning Challenges? Cognition and Instruction, 31(4), 388–433. doi:10.1080/07370008.2013.828728
  • Dietiker, L., Gonulates, F., & Smith III, J. P. (2011). Enhancing opportunities for student understanding of length measure. Teaching Children Mathematics, 18(4), 252-259, Reston, VA.
  • Newton, J., Horvath, A., & Dietiker, L. (2011). The statistical process: A view across K-8 state standards. In J. P. Smith III (Ed.), Variability is the rule: A companion analysis of K-8 state mathematics standards (Vol. 2). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.
  • Brakoniecki, A., & Dietiker, L. (2010). When is seeing not believing: A look at diagrams in mathematics education. In D. B. Erchick, A. Manouchehri, & D. Owens (Eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education. Columbus, OH.

        Selected Presentations

          • Dietiker, L. (2013). A Tale of Two Algebra Lessons: A Contrast of Mathematical Plots. Presented on October 7, 2013 at University of California, Berkeley, CA.
          • Dietiker, L. (2013). A Panel of Education Designers. Presentation at the International Society for Design and Development in Education (ISDDE). Berkeley, MA.
          • Dietiker, L. (2013). Framing a mathematics lesson as a story: A window into the aesthetics of a lesson. Presented at the 2013 Annual Research Pre-session of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, San Francisco, CA.
          • Dietiker, L. (2011). Mathematical stories: A way of understanding mathematics curriculum. Workshop led at the National Conference of CPM Educational Program, Sacramento, CA.
          • Dietiker, L. (2011). How do we design textbooks to strategically develop metacognition? Presentation at the International Society for Design and Development in Education (ISDDE). Boston, MA.
          • Dietiker, L. (2011). Curricular invitations and opportunities for strategic judgment. Presented at the 2011 Annual Research Pre-session of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Indianapolis, IN.
          • Dietiker, L. (2011). The stories of textbooks: Exploring sequences in mathematics curriculum. Presented at the 2011 Annual Research Pre-session of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Indianapolis, IN.
          • Brakoniecki, A. & Dietiker, L. (2011). Sequences and transitions in grades K-12 textbooks. Presented at the 2011 Annual Research Pre-session of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Indianapolis, IN.

            · Dietiker, L. (in progress). What’s the story? A framework for the interrogation of mathematics curriculum.

            · Dietiker, L., & Brakoniecki, A. (in progress). Reading geometrically: The negotiation of expected meaning of diagrams in math textbooks.

            · Dietiker, L. (2013). Mathematics texts as narrative: Rethinking curriculum. For the Learning of Mathematics, 33(3), 14–19.

            · Smith, J. P., Males, L. M., Dietiker, L. C., Lee, K., & Mosier, A. (2013). Curricular Treatments of Length Measurement in the United States: Do They Address Known Learning Challenges? Cognition and Instruction, 31(4), 388–433. doi:10.1080/07370008.2013.828728

            · Dietiker, L., Gonulates, F., & Smith III, J. P. (2011). Enhancing opportunities for student understanding of length measure. Teaching Children Mathematics, 18(4), 252-259, Reston, VA.

            · Newton, J., Horvath, A., & Dietiker, L. (2011). The statistical process: A view across K-8 state standards. In J. P. Smith III (Ed.), Variability is the rule: A companion analysis of K-8 state mathematics standards (Vol. 2). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

            · Brakoniecki, A., & Dietiker, L. (2010). When is seeing not believing: A look at diagrams in mathematics education. In D. B. Erchick, A. Manouchehri, & D. Owens (Eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education. Columbus, OH.

            • Dietiker, L. (in progress). What’s the story? A framework for the interrogation of mathematics curriculum.

            • Dietiker, L., & Brakoniecki, A. (in progress). Reading geometrically: The negotiation of expected meaning of diagrams in math textbooks.

            • Dietiker, L. (2013). Mathematics texts as narrative: Rethinking curriculum. For the Learning of Mathematics, 33(3), 14–19.

            • Smith, J. P., Males, L. M., Dietiker, L. C., Lee, K., & Mosier, A. (2013). Curricular Treatments of Length Measurement in the United States: Do They Address Known Learning Challenges? Cognition and Instruction, 31(4), 388–433. doi:10.1080/07370008.2013.828728

            • Dietiker, L., Gonulates, F., & Smith III, J. P. (2011). Enhancing opportunities for student understanding of length measure. Teaching Children Mathematics, 18(4), 252-259, Reston, VA.

            • Newton, J., Horvath, A., & Dietiker, L. (2011). The statistical process: A view across K-8 state standards. In J. P. Smith III (Ed.), Variability is the rule: A companion analysis of K-8 state mathematics standards (Vol. 2). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

            • Brakoniecki, A., & Dietiker, L. (2010). When is seeing not believing: A look at diagrams in mathematics education. In D. B. Erchick, A. Manouchehri, & D. Owens (Eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education. Columbus, OH.

             

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