Contact Info:
Phone: (617) 353-4624
Email: kfrankel@bu.edu

Educational History

  • Ph.D., Language, Literacy, & Culture, University of California, Berkeley
  • M.A., English & American Literature, New York University
  • B.A., Comparative Literature, Dartmouth College

Profile

Katherine Frankel is an assistant professor of literacy at Boston University. In her research, she uses sociocultural theories to examine teaching and learning in secondary schools with a focus on adolescents’ literacies in and out of school. Her most recent work explores the reading and writing opportunities that are available to students in literacy intervention classes and other content-area classes and how these opportunities shape students’ identities as readers and writers.

Prior to completing her doctorate, Dr. Frankel was a grammar and composition teacher and reading tutor at Landmark High School in Beverly, MA.

Courses Taught

  • SED LS792: Teaching Reading and Writing in the Content Areas
  • SED LW736: Teaching Writing in Elementary, Middle, and Secondary Schools

Selected Publications

  • Frankel, K. K. (2013). Revisiting the role of explicit genre instruction in the classroom. Journal of Education, 193(1), 17-30.
  • Frankel, K. K., & Pearson, P. D. (2013). Reflections on becoming a researcher. Journal of Education, 193(1), 31-34.
  • Frankel, K. K., Jaeger, E., & Pearson, P. D. (2013). Embracing complexity: Integrating reading, writing, and learning in intervention settings. In E. Ortlieb & E. H. Cheek, Jr. (Eds.), School-based interventions for struggling readers, K-8 (pp. 3-20). Bingley, UK: Emerald Group.
  • Frankel, K. K. (2012). Coping with the double bind: Bidirectional learning and development in the Zone of Proximal Development. Learning, Culture & Social Interaction, 1, 153-166.
  • Frankel, K.K., Pearson, P.D., & Nair, M. (2011). Reading comprehension and reading disability. In A. McGill-Franzen & R. L. Allington (Eds.), Handbook of reading disability research (pp. 219-231). New York, NY: Routledge.

Selected Presentations

  • Frankel, K. K. (November, 2012). “Contexts of expansive learning? Ninth-grade reading intervention classes from a student perspective.” Paper presented at the 2012 Literacy Research Association Conference, San Diego, CA.
  • Frankel, K. K. (October, 2012). “Understanding ‘remediation’ from the student’s perspective: The potential for expansive learning in ninth-grade literacy intervention classes.” Paper presented at the 2012 UC-ACCORD Conference, Lake Arrowhead, CA.
  • Stornaiuolo, A., & Frankel, K. K. (2011). “Skimmers, miners, and confounders: Understanding the participation spectrum on an international social network.” Paper presented at the 2011 Digital Media and Learning Conference, Long Beach, CA.
 

Educational History

Ph.D., Language, Literacy, & Culture, University of California, Berkeley

M.A., English & American Literature, New York University

B.A., Comparative Literature, Dartmouth College

Contact Info

Phone: (617) 353-4624
Email: kfrankel@bu.edu

Profile (BIO)

Katherine Frankel is an assistant professor of literacy at Boston University. In her research, she uses sociocultural theories to examine teaching and learning in secondary schools with a focus on adolescents’ literacies in and out of school. Her most recent work explores the reading and writing opportunities that are available to students in literacy intervention classes and other content-area classes and how these opportunities shape students’ identities as readers and writers.

Prior to completing her doctorate, Dr. Frankel was a grammar and composition teacher and reading tutor at Landmark High School in Beverly, MA.

Courses Taught

SED LS792: Teaching Reading and Writing in the Content Areas

SED LW736: Teaching Writing in Elementary, Middle, and Secondary Schools

Selected Publications

Frankel, K. K. (2013). Revisiting the role of explicit genre instruction in the classroom. Journal of Education, 193(1), 17-30.

Frankel, K. K., & Pearson, P. D. (2013). Reflections on becoming a researcher. Journal of Education, 193(1), 31-34.

Frankel, K. K., Jaeger, E., & Pearson, P. D. (2013). Embracing complexity: Integrating reading, writing, and learning in intervention settings. In E. Ortlieb & E. H. Cheek, Jr. (Eds.), School-based interventions for struggling readers, K-8 (pp. 3-20). Bingley, UK: Emerald Group.

Frankel, K. K. (2012). Coping with the double bind: Bidirectional learning and development in the Zone of Proximal Development. Learning, Culture & Social Interaction, 1, 153-166.

Frankel, K.K., Pearson, P.D., & Nair, M. (2011). Reading comprehension and reading disability. In A. McGill-Franzen & R. L. Allington (Eds.), Handbook of reading disability research (pp. 219-231). New York, NY: Routledge.

Selected Presentations

Frankel, K. K. (November, 2012). “Contexts of expansive learning? Ninth-grade reading intervention classes from a student perspective.” Paper presented at the 2012 Literacy Research Association Conference, San Diego, CA.

Frankel, K. K. (October, 2012). “Understanding ‘remediation’ from the student’s perspective: The potential for expansive learning in ninth-grade literacy intervention classes.” Paper presented at the 2012 UC-ACCORD Conference, Lake Arrowhead, CA.

Stornaiuolo, A., & Frankel, K. K. (2011). “Skimmers, miners, and confounders: Understanding the participation spectrum on an international social network.” Paper presented at the 2011 Digital Media and Learning Conference, Long Beach, CA.

 

 

Educational History

Ph.D., Language, Literacy, & Culture, University of California, Berkeley

M.A., English & American Literature, New York University

B.A., Comparative Literature, Dartmouth College

Contact Info

Phone: (617) 353-4624

Email: kfrankel@bu.edu

Profile (BIO)

Katherine Frankel is an assistant professor of literacy at Boston University. In her research, she uses sociocultural theories to examine teaching and learning in secondary schools with a focus on adolescents’ literacies in and out of school. Her most recent work explores the reading and writing opportunities that are available to students in literacy intervention classes and other content-area classes and how these opportunities shape students’ identities as readers and writers.

Prior to completing her doctorate, Dr. Frankel was a grammar and composition teacher and reading tutor at Landmark High School in Beverly, MA.

Courses Taught

SED LS792: Teaching Reading and Writing in the Content Areas

SED LW736: Teaching Writing in Elementary, Middle, and Secondary Schools

Selected Publications

Frankel, K. K. (2013). Revisiting the role of explicit genre instruction in the classroom. Journal of Education, 193(1), 17-30.

Frankel, K. K., & Pearson, P. D. (2013). Reflections on becoming a researcher. Journal of Education, 193(1), 31-34.

Frankel, K. K., Jaeger, E., & Pearson, P. D. (2013). Embracing complexity: Integrating reading, writing, and learning in intervention settings. In E. Ortlieb & E. H. Cheek, Jr. (Eds.), School-based interventions for struggling readers, K-8 (pp. 3-20). Bingley, UK: Emerald Group.

Frankel, K. K. (2012). Coping with the double bind: Bidirectional learning and development in the Zone of Proximal Development. Learning, Culture & Social Interaction, 1, 153-166.

Frankel, K.K., Pearson, P.D., & Nair, M. (2011). Reading comprehension and reading disability. In A. McGill-Franzen & R. L. Allington (Eds.), Handbook of reading disability research (pp. 219-231). New York, NY: Routledge.

Selected Presentations

Frankel, K. K. (November, 2012). “Contexts of expansive learning? Ninth-grade reading intervention classes from a student perspective.” Paper presented at the 2012 Literacy Research Association Conference, San Diego, CA.

Frankel, K. K. (October, 2012). “Understanding ‘remediation’ from the student’s perspective: The potential for expansive learning in ninth-grade literacy intervention classes.” Paper presented at the 2012 UC-ACCORD Conference, Lake Arrowhead, CA.

Stornaiuolo, A., & Frankel, K. K. (2011). “Skimmers, miners, and confounders: Understanding the participation spectrum on an international social network.” Paper presented at the 2011 Digital Media and Learning Conference, Long Beach, CA.

 

 

 

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