Contact Information:
Phone: 617 353-3924
Email: cmartell@bu.edu

Website: www.christophercmartell.com

Educational History

  • Ed.D. in Curriculum and Teaching, Boston University
  • M.Ed. in Curriculum and Instruction, Boston College
  • B.A. in History, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Profile

Dr. Martell’s work primarily focuses on social studies and teacher education. He currently teaches elementary and secondary social studies methods and courses on multicultural and urban schooling. He was a high school social studies teacher for eleven years in urban and suburban contexts. For most of his teaching career, he taught at Framingham High School, which is a racially and economically diverse urban school outside Boston with large immigrant populations from Brazil, Central America, and the Caribbean. As a teacher, he engaged in regular examinations of his own classroom practices through action research. Previously, Dr. Martell was an adjunct professor at BU and UMass Boston, where he taught courses on secondary social studies methods and teacher research, and a BU field supervisor at Chelsea High School.

Dr. Martell’s research and professional interests center on teacher development across the career span, including preservice teacher preparation, inservice teacher education, and practitioner inquiry. He is particularly interested in social studies teachers in urban and multicultural contexts, critical race theory, culturally relevant pedagogy, and constructivist theories of teaching and learning. Dr. Martell’s recent research projects have examined social studies teacher education through longitudinal studies and the role of race and ethnicity in the history classroom.

Courses Taught

  • CAS SO 210, Confronting Persistent Social Inequalities in American Schools
  • CAS SO 211, Confronting Racial, Cultural, Gender, and Social Identities in Urban Classrooms
  • SED CH 300, Methods of Instruction: Elementary 1-6 (Social Studies)
  • SED CH 515, Curriculum Methods 1-6 (Social Studies)
  • SED CT 575, General Methods of Instruction 5-12
  • SED SO 566, Developing Historical Literacy 5-12
  • SED RS 620, Action Research and Practitioner Inquiry

Selected Publications

  • Martell, C. C. (2014). Building a constructivist practice: A longitudinal study of beginning history teachers. The Teacher Educator, 49(2), 97-115.
  • Martell, C. C. (2013). Race and histories: Examining culturally relevant teaching in the U.S. history classroom. Theory & Research in Social Education, 41(1), 65-88.
  • Martell, C. C. (2013). Learning to teach history as interpretation: A longitudinal study of beginning teachers. The Journal of Social Studies Research, 37(1), 17-31.
  • Dunne, K. A. & Martell, C. C. (2013). Teaching America’s past to our newest Americans: Immigrant students and United States history. Social Education, 77(4), 192-195.
  • Martell, C. C. & Hashimoto-Martell, E. A. (2012). Throwing out the textbook: A teacher research study of changing texts in the history classroom. In H. Hickman & B. J. Porfilio (Eds.), The new politics of the textbook: Critical analysis in the core content areas (pp. 305-320). Boston, MA: Sense Publishers.

Selected Presentations

  • Martell, C. C. (2014). Teaching about race in a multicultural setting: Culturally relevant pedagogy and the U.S. history classroom. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Philadelphia, PA.
  • Martell, C. C. (2014). Action research as empowering professional development: Examining a district-based teacher research course. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Philadelphia, PA.
  • Martell, C. C. (2013). Whiteness in the social studies classroom: Students’ conceptions of race and ethnicity in U.S. history. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco, CA.
  • Martell, C. C. (2012). Investigating the intersection of race and histories in the classroom. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Vancouver, BC.
  • Martell, C. C. (2012). Making meaning of constructivism: A longitudinal study of beginning history teachers’ beliefs and practices. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Vancouver, BC.
  • Martell, C. C. & Hashimoto-Martell, E. A. (2011). Throwing out the history textbook: Changing social studies texts and the impact on students. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, LA.
  • Martell, C. C. (2011). A longitudinal study of learning to teach history as interpretation. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, LA.
  • Martell, C. C. (2011). Taking on the history textbook: A critical examination of texts used in a social studies classroom. Paper presented at the University of Pennsylvania Ethnography in Education Research Forum, Philadelphia, PA.
  • Martell, C. C. (2010). Barriers to historical inquiry: The disconnection between the beliefs and classroom practices of preservice social studies teachers. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the College and University Faculty Assembly of the National Council for the Social Studies, Denver, CO.
  • Martell, C. C. (2010). Continuously uncertain reform effort: State-mandated history and social science curriculum and the perceptions of teachers. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Denver, CO.
  • Heald, S. C., Zavagnin, A. J., & Martell, C. C. (2009). Moving forward into the past: How teachers teach and learn history. Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the National Council for the Social Studies, Atlanta, GA.
    SED CH 300 Methods of Instruction: Elementary 1-6 (Social Studies)

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