Professor Reed Invited to Present in Australia at World Congress of International Association of Applied Linguistics

Reed, MarnieProfessor Marnie Reed has been invited to present at the 17th World Congress of the International Association of Applied Linguistics (AILA) to be held at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, from August 10-15.

Reed has been selected to conduct a pair of workshops at the triennial AILA Congress. In her solo workshop, she will present her paper entitled Relating Intonation Research to Language Teaching: Metacognitive Strategies Bridge Learner Gaps in Understanding Speaker Intent. Reed will also give a joint presentation with Tamara Jones on their paper entitled Pragmatic Functions of English Stress and Intonation: Often Overlooked, Always Essential, Ultimately Teachable.

The AILA has more than 8,000 members in more than 30 different applied linguistics associations around the world. It holds the World Congress of Applied Linguistics once every three years. They also publish the AILA News, a newsletter, and the AILA Review, an academic journal.

Summaries for both papers being presented are available below.

Relating Intonation Research to Language Teaching: Metacognitive Strategies Bridge Learner Gaps in Understanding Speaker Intent

Summary: Levis (1999) claims intonation research is divorced from language teaching. Vandergrift and Goh (2012) claim learners understand the words but not the message. This workshop connects empirically tested assessment and pedagogic materials to a metacognitive approach to suprasegmental instruction designed to increase leaner accuracy recognizing the pragmatic functions of intonation.

Pragmatic Functions of English Stress and Intonation: Often Overlooked, Always Essential, Ultimately Teachable

Summary: Intonation plays important but often overlooked roles in how speakers and listeners convey and interpret implied meaning. English learners are at a disadvantage when they are not able to infer meaning in opaque language. In this presentation, the speakers suggest practical, engaging activities for seamlessly integrating intonation instruction into lessons.

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