Associate Dean Solberg Writes for Ed Week on ILPs

SEDFACULTYAssociate Dean V. Scott Solberg co-wrote a commentary piece for Education Week with Curtis Richards, the director of the Center for Workforce Development at the Institute for Educational Leadership, in Washington. Solberg and Richards discuss Individualized Lesson Plans and how the plans allow students to become the leaders of their own education. Below is an excerpt from”Planning for Life After High School” on EdWeek.org

Planning for Life After High School by V. Scott Solberg & Curtis Richards

Every so often in education, new ideas are introduced and spread across states and districts as if they had a life of their own.

The rise of individualized learning plans, or ILPs, may represent just such an idea. These personalized learning strategies strive to strengthen the transition between school and college or work while bolstering student engagement and family involvement in learning.

In 2005, 21 states encouraged the use of ILPs. Our research with the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth (NCWD/Youth) indicates that today at least 37 states and the District of Columbia view ILPs as an anchor for their college- and career-readiness efforts. These plans, known by different names in each state, are typically required of all students, including students with disabilities and other special populations.

ILPs are different from, but closely related and complementary to, the transition plans that students receiving special education services are federally required to incorporate into their individualized education programs (IEPs) once they reach age 16.

When implemented as a whole-school program, ILPs are designed to engage all students in becoming career-ready by helping them define the secondary and postsecondary plans that will help them achieve their self-defined career goals.

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Visit EdWeek.org for the full article.

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