• Education:Master of Public Health, New York University, 2012
    PhD in Anthropology, Rutgers University, 2010
    Master of Arts in Anthropology, Rutgers University, 2005
    Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology, University of Georgia, 2001
  • Phone:617-358-0706

Health Matters Virtual Conference

Panel Presentation: “Child Development” – Hosted by Boston University College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College, this presentation was a part of an online, virtual conference, “Health Matters,” which took place on September 17, 2015.

Selected Publications

  • Dunham, B. (2016). Homebirth midwifery in the United States: Evolutionary origins and modern challenges. Human Nature, 27, 471-488.
  • Campbell, L., Cronk, L., Simpson, J., Milroy, A., Wigington, T., & Dunham, B. (2009). The association between men’s ratings of women as desirable long-term mates and individual differences in women’s sexual attitudes and behaviors. Personality and Individual Differences, 46, 509–513.
  • Cronk, L., & Dunham, B. (2007). Amounts spent on engagement rings reflect aspects of male and female mate quality. Human Nature, 18, 329–333.

Book Chapter

  • Dunham, B. The role for signaling theory and receiver psychology in marketing. In G. Saad (Ed.), Evolutionary Psychology in the Business Sciences (pp.
    225–256). Heidelberg: Springer, 2011.

Selected Presentations

  • Dunham, B. Roundtable participant for the session Anthropology matters: Fighting essentialist ideas about poverty, race, and intelligence in the Trump era. Roundtable presented at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, November 2016.
  • Dunham, B. & Resnick, K. Caring for the mother: Evolutionary foundations of doula support and its contemporary role in northeastern U.S. hospital settings. Paper presented at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, MN, November 2016.
  • Dunham, B. Evolutionary obstetrics in the living room. Poster presented at the Human Behavior and Evolution Society Annual Meeting, Vancouver, BC, June 2016.
  • Hall, S., Parker, L., & Dunham, B. The births women want and the births women get: An anthropological roadmap for increased birthing options in the United States. Poster presented (by Sara Hall and Lindsey Parker) at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, Denver, CO, November 2015.
  • Escasa-Dorne, M. J., & Dunham, B. Variation in postpartum reproductive functioning: Adaptive tradeoffs between parenting and mating effort. Paper presented (by Michelle Escasa-Dorne) at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, Denver, CO, November 2015.
  • Dunham, B. Integrating evolutionary insights within baccalaureate public health programs. Paper presented at the International Society for Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health Inaugural Meeting, Tempe, AZ, March 2015.
  • Dunham, B. Midwifery, modernity, and staying home to give birth. Paper presented at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, December 2014.
  • Parker, L., & Dunham, B. Giving birth in Georgia: Factors associated with women’s plans for labor and delivery in a southern U.S. state. Poster presented (by Lindsey Parker) at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, December 2014.
  • Dunham, B., & Stieglitz, J. Applications of evolutionary anthropology for public health research, policy, and practice. Paper presented within an Invited Session of the Evolutionary Anthropology Society at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, November 2013.
  • Cliff, K., & Dunham, B. How does evolutionary anthropology inform public health curricula at the graduate level? Paper presented (by Kalie Cliff) at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, November 2013.
  • Frank, K., & Dunham, B. Evolutionary principles in public health curricula. Paper presented (by Kalie Frank) at the National Council on Undergraduate Research Annual Conference, La Crosse, WI, April 2013.
  • Dunham, B., McKenna, J. J., & Gettler, L. T. Evolutionary mis-steps at the border of anthropology and public health: Interpretations of safe infant sleep messages in New York City. Paper presented at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, November 2012.
  • Dunham, B., McKenna, J. J., & Gettler, L. T. The pitfalls of current public health messages on “safe” infant sleep: Absence of evolutionary insights on cosleeping. Poster presented at the Human Behavior and Evolution Society Annual Meeting, Albuquerque, NM, June 2012.
  • Dunham, B. The role for human behavioral ecology in global public health. Poster presented at the American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, Montréal, Quebec, November 2011.

Professional Memberships

  • American Public Health Association Section membership: Maternal and Child Health, 2010-present.
  • American Anthropological Association Section memberships: Biological Anthropology Society, Evolutionary Anthropology Society, Society for Anthropological Sciences, Society for Medical Anthropology, 2005-present.
  • Human Behavior and Evolution Society, 2002-present.

Licenses and Certifications

  • Certified in Public Health (CPH), 2013- present.

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