Academics / Academic Programs

Required Courses

All courses are 4 credits unless otherwise indicated.

Fall 1

This course provides an introduction to nutrition and focuses on the relationship between diet and health. Basic scientific information is presented in preparation for a discussion of applied issues such as weight loss, eating disorders, prevention of chronic disease, diet and exercise and vegetarian diets. Emphasis is placed on translation of current advice to actual food choices. 4 credits, either semester (Credits: 4)

Graduate elective (3 – 4)

Spring 1

This course focuses on the changing nutritional requirements from infancy, childhood, and adolescence throughout the geriatric years. Nutritional needs specific to pregnancy and lactation will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on understanding the behavioral, socioeconomic, and cultural factors associated with meeting nutrition requirements throughout the life span. 4 credits, 2nd semester (Credits: 4)

Graduate elective

Fall 2

This course examines epidemiologic methods for investigating the role of diet in long-term health. Students learn to critically review the epidemiologic evidence relating diet, anthropometry, and physical activity to heart disease, cancer, and other chronic health conditions including obesity and diabetes. The methodological issues covered include epidemiologic study design; dietary and nutritional status assessment; issues of bias, confounding, effect modification and measurement error; and interpretation of research findings including an understanding of statistical modeling. Students participate weekly in critical reviews of published research. Students completing this course will understand the principles of epidemiology and will be able to apply them as they read the scientific literature and participate in nutrition-related research. (Credits: 4)

A review of metabolism as the basis for understanding human nutritional requirements. Metabolism of carbohydrate, protein, and fat, as well as the regulation of these processes during various physiologic states are examined. Application of these principles to current topics in both normal and therapeutic nutrition is discussed. (Credits: 4)

Graduate elective

Spring 2

Focuses on the etiology of major nutrition problems in the U.S. population and the role of the diet in disease prevention and treatment. Included are nutrition issues facing at-risk populations within our society, including pregnant and lactating women, infants and children, and the elderly. The role of diet in the development/prevention of cardiac disease, cancer, osteoporosis, and other chronic diseases is discussed. Students are expected to integrate a knowledge of normal physiologic changes, biochemistry, pathophysiology, metabolism, and nutrient requirements throughout the life cycle with recent advances in the field of nutrition. (Credits: 4)

This course teaches students to prepare a mock research grant proposal that would be used to compete for research funding. Students are challenged to define a new area of research based on a critical review of existing literature on a specific nutrition-related health topic of personal interest. Course competencies include formulation of a testable research hypothesis and selection of an appropriate research design, study population, methodology, and analysis plan. This course helps students to refine their scientific writing skills, and introduces them to budget planning and ethical issues related to research involving human subjects. (Credits: 2)

Structured clinical learning experience for graduate nutrition students. Placement sites include in- and outpatient facilities, adult and pediatric hospitals, public health agencies, private agencies, newsletter agencies, and long-term care facilities. (Credits: 3)