Each course carries 4 credits unless otherwise indicated.

Freshman Year

Semester I

CASBI107: Biology I

For students who plan to concentrate in the natural sciences or environmental science, and for premedical students. Required for biology concentrators. No prerequisite. High school biology is assumed. The evolution and diversity of life; principles of ecology; behavioral biology. Three hours lecture, three hours lab including several field studies. Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS.

CASCH101: General Chemistry 1

For science majors and minors who require a two-semester general chemistry course. Topics include: atoms and molecules; molecular connectivity, infrared spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry; stoichiometry and introduction to reactions in aqueous solutions; thermochemistry and the first law of thermodynamics; quantum aspects of light and matter; and bonding in diatomic and polyatomic molecules. Laboratory exercises include: the size of an atom, qualitative analysis, thermochemistry, and quantum aspects of light and matter. Students must register for the following four course components: lecture, discussion, pre-lab lecture and laboratory. Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS.

CASWR100: Writing Seminar

Topic-based seminar in academic reading and writing. Attention to reading and analyzing primary and secondary sources, argumentation, prose style, revision, and citation. Significant writing and individual conferences.

SARHP150: Freshman Year Experience

This course is designed to provide an orientation to freshmen about the college experience. Expectations, guidelines and resources will be made available to aid freshmen in making informed decisions about the quality of their education while clarifying and enhancing the students' experiences with the Boston University community. Interaction with faculty advisors and peer mentors is provided.

SARHP151: Introduction to the Health and Rehabilitation Professions

Freshmen Seminar. Exploration of the roles and functions of the health and rehabilitation disciplines. Introduction to the health care system and its impact on society. Sargent students only.

PDP activity (2 credits)

Semester II

CASBI108: Biology II

For students planning to concentrate in the natural sciences and for premedical students. It is strongly recommended students complete CAS CH 101 (or equivalent) before this course. High school biology is assumed. Cell and molecular biology, Mendelian & molecular genetics, physiology, and neurobiology. Three hours lecture, three hours lab. Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS.

CASCH102: General Chemistry 2

For science majors and minors who require a two-semester general chemistry course. Topics include: properties of gases; solutions and solubility; equilibrium; acids, bases, and buffers; electrochemistry; spontaneity, free energy and the second law of thermodynamics; and chemical kinetics. Students must have completed CAS CH 101 prior to enrolling in CAS CH 102. Students must register for the following four course components: lecture, discussion, pre-lab lecture, and laboratory. Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS.

CASPS101: General Psychology

Basic introduction to field of psychology; topics include theories and findings governing learning, memory, perception, development, personality, social and abnormal psychology. Three hours large lecture and one hour discussion section or three hours of small lecture class with no discussion sections. Requirements vary. Students are required to participate as subjects in psychology studies. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS.

CASWR150: Writing and Research Seminar

Topic-based seminar in academic reading, writing, and research. Continuing attention to argumentation, prose style, revision, and citation, with additional emphasis on college-level research. Significant writing and individual conferences.

Sophomore Year

Semester I

CASBI203: Cell Biology (CM)

Principles of cellular organization and function: biological molecules, flow of genetic information, membranes and subcellular organelles, and cell regulation. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion.

CASCH203: Organic Chemistry 1

Fundamentals of contemporary organic chemistry, including electronic structure, stereochemistry, and reactions of important functional groups. Laboratory includes extraction, distillation, and chromatography. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion, one hour prelab lecture, three-and-a-half hours lab in alternate weeks.

CASMA121: Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences I

Students may receive credit for either CAS MA 121 or 123, but not both. Differentiation and integration of functions of one variable. Same topics as CAS MA 123, but with less emphasis on mathematical generality and more on application. Especially suitable for students concentrating in the biological and social sciences. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS.

CAS HUXX: Humanities elective

Semester II

CASBI315: Systems Physiology (PER/Neuro)

An introduction to physiological principles applied across all levels of organization (cell, tissue, organ system). Preparation for more advanced courses in physiology. Topics include homeostasis and neural, muscle, respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and metabolic physiology. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.

CASCH204: Organic Chemistry 2

Fundamentals of contemporary chemistry, including electronic structure, stereochemistry, and reactions of important functional groups. Laboratory includes extraction, distillation, and chromatography. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion, one hour prelab lecture, three-and-a-half hours lab in alternate weeks.

CASMA122: Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences II

Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 122, MA 124, MA 127 or MA 129. Continuation of CAS MA 121. Review of univariate calculus, calculus of the elementary transcendental functions, elementary differential equations, elementary multivariate calculus. Applications to exponential growth, optimization, equilibrium, and dynamic modeling problems. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS.

CASSSXXX: Social sciences elective*

*For students planning to apply to medical school, the department recommends taking SO100 Principles in Sociology or SO215 Sociology of Healthcare to prepare for the MCAT exam.

Junior Year

Semester I

CASPY105: Elementary Physics 1

The CAS PY 105/106 sequence satisfies premedical requirements; presupposes knowledge of algebra and trigonometry. Principles of classical and modern physics, mechanics, conservation laws, and heat. Students must register for three sections: a lecture section, a discussion section, and a laboratory section. Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS.

CAS HUXX: Humanities Elective

CAS SSXX: Social Science Elective

Choose one group of the following:

CASCH273: Principles of Biochemistry

Biomolecules in aqueous systems. Composition, structure, and function of proteins, nucleic acids, and polysaccharides. Information transfer from DNA to RNA and proteins. Bioenergetic principles in glycolysis, oxidative energy metabolism, and selected biosynthetic paths. Applications to medicine, nutrition, and biotechnology. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion.

CASCH421: Biochemistry I

Introductory biochemistry. Protein structure and folding, enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, and allostery; nucleic acid structure; lipids and membrane structure; bioenergetics; vitamins and coenzymes; introduction to intermediary metabolism. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion, four hours lab.

CASPY106: Elementary Physics 2

The CAS PY 105/106 sequence satisfies premedical requirements; presupposes knowledge of algebra and trigonometry. Principles of classical and modern physics; electricity and magnetism, waves, optics, light, atomic and nuclear physics. Students must register for three sections: a lecture section, discussion section, and laboratory section. Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS.

Semester II

CASMA113: Elementary Statistics

MA 113 may not be taken for credit by any student who has completed any MA course numbered 300 or higher. Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 113, MA 115, or MA 213. Basic concepts of estimation and tests of hypotheses, ideas from probability; one-, two-, and multiple-sample problems. Applications in social sciences. Primarily for students in the social sciences who require a one-semester introduction to statistics; others should consider CAS MA 115 or MA 213. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS.

CAS HUXX: Humanities elective.

Choose one of the following:

CASPS211: Introduction to Experimental Design in Psychology

Introduction to logic and methodology of univariate statistics with relevance to psychology. Topics include descriptive statistics, data representation, statistical inference, probability and significance, correlation and regression, and non parametric analyses. Does not count toward nine principal course requirement for majors.

SARHS342: Exercise Physiology

Application of physiological principles under different exercise conditions. Integration of the body systems in performance of exercise, work and sports; immediate and long-range effects of these activities on the body. Laboratory includes the measurement of physiological parameters under exercise conditions.

Senior Year

Semester I

SARHS251: Human Nutrition Science

This course provides an introduction to nutrition and focuses on the relationship between diet and health. Basic scientific information is presented in preparation for discussion of applied issues such as weight loss, eating disorders, prevention of chronic disease, diet and exercise and vegetarian diets. Emphasis is placed on translation of current advice to actual food choices. 4 credits, either semester

SARHS369: Gross Human Anatomy

Integrative approach to the musculoskeletal, peripheral nervous, and circulatory systems of the human body. Regional approach is used to present lectures with the use of projected drawings, films, slides, and demonstrations. Weekly labs reinforce the lectures by a study of osteology, dissected cadavers, and live anatomy palpations.

SARHS410: Field Experience: Human Physiology

Practical experience in a research lab, clinic, community, or industrial setting, as appropriate.

General elective3 (e.g. Neuro Disorders4)

Semester II

SARHS370: Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology

Lecture and laboratory related to the detailed study of development, morphology, internal configuration, and functions, and pathological deficits of the peripheral and central nervous system in humans.

SARHS375: Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology

Overview of anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems during normal and pathological conditions. Pathophysiology of exercise performance in cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Adaptations to physical conditioning in these diseases.

SARHS410: Field Experience: Human Physiology

Practical experience in a research lab, clinic, community, or industrial setting, as appropriate.

General electives3 (e.g. Muscle Biology)

Total Credits for Human Physiology = 128

1For students planning to apply to medical school, the department recommends taking the biochemistry sequence CAS CH 421 and 422, but CAS CH 273 is acceptable. CAS CH 422 Biochemistry II may be taken as a general elective. Human Physiology students wishing to pursue a chemistry minor may only use two of the chemistry courses required for the HP major toward this minor.

2HS 410 can be taken fall or spring

3 When also registered for HS 410, students register for 4 elective credits; otherwise, students register for 8 elective credits.

4 Students who wish to take Neuro Disorders (to be offered every other fall) should plan to take HS 369 in the fall of junior year, HS 370 in the spring of the junior year, and HS 342 in the fall of the senior year.

* For students planning to apply to physician assistant or nursing graduate programs, the department recommends taking microbiology with a lab: CAS BI 311 (BI 206, genetics, is a prerequisite).  Depending upon the specific programs to which you apply, CAS BI 114 or GMS BT 426 may also fulfill the requirement.