Freshman Year

Semester I

CASBI105: Introductory Biology for Health Sciences

Principles of biology; emphasis on cellular structure, genetics, microbiology, development, biochemistry, metabolism, and immunology. This course is appropriate for non-majors and students in the health and paramedical sciences (Sargent College). Students may not receive credit for CAS BI 105 if CAS BI 108 has already been passed. Three hours lecture, two hours lab. Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS.

CASCH171: Principles of General Chemistry

Introduction to chemistry: separation and purification of matter, atomic theory, structure of atoms, molecules and chemical bonding, chemical formulas, equations, stoichiometry; water, solutions, concentration, acids, bases, pH and buffers; gases; reaction kinetics and equilibrium, and radioactivity. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion, one hour prelab lecture, and three hours lab. Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS.

CASWR100: Writing Seminar

Topic-based seminar in academic reading and writing. Attention to reading and analyzing primary and secondary sources, argumentation, prose style, revision, and citation. Significant writing and individual conferences.

SARHP150: Freshman Year Experience

This course is designed to provide an orientation to freshmen about the college experience. Expectations, guidelines and resources will be made available to aid freshmen in making informed decisions about the quality of their education while clarifying and enhancing the students' experiences with the Boston University community. Interaction with faculty advisors and peer mentors is provided.

SARHP151: Introduction to the Health and Rehabilitation Professions

Freshmen Seminar. Exploration of the roles and functions of the health and rehabilitation disciplines. Introduction to the health care system and its impact on society. Sargent students only.

CASMA118: College Algebra and Trigonometry

MA 118 may not be taken for credit by any student who has completed any MA course numbered 121 or higher. Functions and graphs. Linear and quadratic equations. Exponents; logarithms. Right and oblique triangles; trigonometric functions. Optimization. Specifically intended to prepare students with insufficient background in mathematics for the study of calculus. This course may not be used in fulfillment of the divisional studies requirement. Satisfies the mathematics requirement in the College program.

OR

CASMA121: Calculus for the Life and Social Sciences I

Students may receive credit for either CAS MA 121 or 123, but not both. Differentiation and integration of functions of one variable. Same topics as CAS MA 123, but with less emphasis on mathematical generality and more on application. Especially suitable for students concentrating in the biological and social sciences. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS.

Semester II

CASBI106: Human Anatomy

Intensive preprofessional course for students whose programs require anatomy. Not for biology concentration credit. Gross structure of the human body; skeletal, muscular, nervous, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Three hours lecture, two hours lab (lab requires dissection). Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS.

CASCH172: Principles of Organic and Biochemistry

Organic chemistry: structure, stereochemistry, and reactions of carbon compounds; emphasis on compounds of biochemical interest: polysaccharides, lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins. Biochemistry: structure and function of molecules of biological importance; metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids. Three hours lecture, one hour discussion, one hour prelab lecture, and three hours lab. Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS. CAS CH 171 combined with CAS CH 172 is intended as a terminal sequence.

CASPS101: General Psychology

Basic introduction to field of psychology; topics include theories and findings governing learning, memory, perception, development, personality, social and abnormal psychology. Three hours large lecture and one hour discussion section or three hours of small lecture class with no discussion sections. Requirements vary. Students are required to participate as subjects in psychology studies. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS.

SARAT205: Athletic Training Practicum I

Initial exposure to the role and skills of an athletic trainer. Includes certification in Emergency Cardiac Care. 1 credit

SARHS201: Introduction to Nutrition

Reviews basic concepts in nutrition including the function of nutrients and the effects of deficiencies and excesses. These basic concepts are then applied to current issues throughout the lifecycle including the role of diet in malnutrition, heart disease, cancer, diabetes,and weight management. Dietary guidelines for prevention of chronic disease are stressed.

Sophomore Year

Semester I

CASBI211: Human Physiology

Some knowledge of chemistry and anatomy assumed. Not for concentration credit; Biology concentrators should take CAS BI 315. Introduction to principles of systemic mammalian physiology with special reference to humans. Three hours lecture, three hours lab.

CASPY105: Elementary Physics 1

The CAS PY 105/106 sequence satisfies premedical requirements; presupposes knowledge of algebra and trigonometry. Principles of classical and modern physics, mechanics, conservation laws, and heat. Students must register for three sections: a lecture section, a discussion section, and a laboratory section. Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS.

SARAT304: Athletic Training Practicum II

This clinical course integrates the fundamental principles of patient care, evidence-based practice, cultural competence, ethical decision making, and communication with students' clnical education experiences completed under the supervision and guidance of a preceptor. The required clinical education experience must be between 80 and 120 hours.

SARAT355: Foundations of Athletic Training

This is the first course in a two- part series on exam and diagnosis, focusing on acute care in athletic training. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the athletic trainer in prevention, diagnosis, and referral of patients in acute distress. This course lays the foundation of evaluation with concentration on primary and secondary surveys particularly during emergency situations. Clinical decision making and hands-on skills are emphasized.

Semester II

CASPY106: Elementary Physics 2

The CAS PY 105/106 sequence satisfies premedical requirements; presupposes knowledge of algebra and trigonometry. Principles of classical and modern physics; electricity and magnetism, waves, optics, light, atomic and nuclear physics. Students must register for three sections: a lecture section, discussion section, and laboratory section. Carries natural science divisional credit (with lab) in CAS.

SARAT305: Athletic Training Practicum III

This clinical course builds on content covered in AT 304: Athletic Training Practicum I with a focus on integrating foundations of professional practice, principles of patient care, and evidence-based practice, with students' clinical experiences completed under the supervision and guidance of a preceptor. The required clinical education experience must be between 80 and 120 hours.

SARAT356: Examination and Diagnosis of Orthopedic Conditions

Evaluation and diagnosis of patients with upper and lower extremity orthopedic conditions; also includes immediate management of orthopedic injuries.

SARHS369: Gross Human Anatomy

Integrative approach to the musculoskeletal, peripheral nervous, and circulatory systems of the human body. Regional approach is used to present lectures with the use of projected drawings, films, slides, and demonstrations. Weekly labs reinforce the lectures by a study of osteology, dissected cadavers, and live anatomy palpations.

Junior Year

Semester I

SARAT404: Clinical Athletic Training I

Continued athletic training experience under the supervision and guidance of a program-approved health provider in an approved setting. This course includes content relating to examination of the head and spine and situational orthopedic and taping assessments. The required clinical education experience must be between 156 and 244 hours.

SARHP531: Clinical Medicine I

An overview of tissue response to injury, pain transmission, and pharmacology provide the foundation from which students will learn about physical agents and specific conditions from a medical perspective. Students will become familiar with the theoretical and practical application of physical agents as it relates to tissue response to injury and pain control. The laboratory portion of this course emphasizes safe and effective application of these modalities using a problem-solving approach to treatment planning and implementation. This course also exposes students to typical surgical techniques used in musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremity and links those interventions to athletic training and physical therapy practice.

SARHS342: Exercise Physiology

Application of physiological principles under different exercise conditions. Integration of the body systems in performance of exercise, work and sports; immediate and long-range effects of these activities on the body. Laboratory includes the measurement of physiological parameters under exercise conditions.

Choice of Statistics Course:

CASMA113: Elementary Statistics

MA 113 may not be taken for credit by any student who has completed any MA course numbered 300 or higher. Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 113, MA 115, or MA 213. Basic concepts of estimation and tests of hypotheses, ideas from probability; one-, two-, and multiple-sample problems. Applications in social sciences. Primarily for students in the social sciences who require a one-semester introduction to statistics; others should consider CAS MA 115 or MA 213. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS.

CASMA115: Statistics I

MA 115 may not be taken for credit by any student who has completed any MA course numbered 300 or higher. Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 113, MA 115, or MA 213. Numerical and graphical summaries of univariate and bivariate data. Basic probability, random variables, binomial distribution, normal distribution. One-sample statistical inference for normal means and binomial probabilities. Primarily for students in the social sciences with limited mathematics preparation.Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS.

CASMA213: Basic Statistics and Probability

Students may receive credit for not more than one of the following courses: CAS MA 113, MA 115, or MA 213. Elementary treatment of probability densities, means, variances, correlation, independence, the binomial distribution, the central limit theorem. Stresses understanding and theoretical manipulation of statistical concepts. Carries MCS divisional credit in CAS.

CASPS211: Introduction to Experimental Design in Psychology

Introduction to logic and methodology of univariate statistics with relevance to psychology. Topics include descriptive statistics, data representation, statistical inference, probability and significance, correlation and regression, and non parametric analyses. Does not count toward nine principal course requirement for majors.

Semester II

SARAT405: Clinical Athletic Training II

Continued athletic training experience under the supervision of a program-approved health care provider in an approved setting. This course includes content relating to general medical conditions and physician and athletic trainer management of these conditions. Other course content includes development of casting, splinting and padding skills and situational orthopedic assessments. A minimum of 156 hours of clinical experience is required.

SARAT430: Orthopedic Rehabilitation

This course will identify various approaches to assessing patients of all levels of function and implementing appropriate, evidence-based, interventions aimed at improving and enhancing that level of function throughout a performance spectrum.

SARHP532: Clinical Medicine II

This course introduces the athletic training and physical therapy student to the normal and abnormal physiology of different body systems, differential diagnoses in common medical conditions, and common orthopedic surgical management of the lower extremity. Factors associated with those body systems that influence AT or PT examination and intervention will be discussed. Also discussed is when referral to other practitioners is recommended and required.

SAR HP 572: Principles of Evidence-Based Practice (3)

Senior Year

Semester I

SARAT432: Organization and Administration of Athletic Training

An overview of administrative concepts and organization of health care facilities that provide athletic training services. A problem-solving approach to facility design, fiscal management, insurance and legal issues is used.

SARAT504: Clinical Athletic Training III

This course provides athletic training experience under the supervision of a program-approved health care provider in an approved setting. The academic portion of this class includes content in advanced situational assessments, development of career enhancement skills, mental health issues, and conditions unique to special populations. A minimum of 156 hours of clinical experience is required. This course meets with HP 504.

SARHP560: General Medicine Practicum

This course provides students with intensive exposure to the practice of general medicine and isThis course provides students with intensive exposure to the practice of general medicine and is designed to augment the content of HP 532: Clinical Medicine II. Students will observe a health care practitioner (MD, DO, PA, NP) in the delivery of general medicine services. designed to augment the content of HP 532: Clinical Medicine II. Students will observe a health care practitioner (MD, DO, PA, NP) in the delivery of general medicine services. Requires recent TB test.

SARHP565: Biomechanics of Human Movement

This course provides an introduction to biomechanics and quantitative movement analysis, with emphasis on rehabilitation. Includes the theoretical basis and clinical application of biomechanics, including kinematic, kinetic, and electromyographic measures. Emphasis on the application of biomechanic principles and measures commonly used to improve our understanding of movement in populations with and without movement dysfunction.

Semester II

SARAT505: Clinical Athletic Training IV

Continued Athletic training experience under the supervision and guidance of a program-approved health care provider in an approved setting. Course meets periodically for formal competency development. Minimum of 156 hours of clinical experience required.

SARHP353: Organization and Delivery of Health Care in the U.S.

The focus of this interdisciplinary course is on increasing the student's understanding of the health care system, the social, environmental, and behavioral factors that affect health care, and on increasing the student's ability to work in interdisciplinary teams. The student will actively engage in individual work, group discussion and teamwork through written, oral, and web site assignments.

Elective Requirements:

2 Social Science electives (8 cr)

1 Humanities elective (in addition to WR 100) (4 cr)

1 PDP (Physical Education Credit Classes)

Remaining credits from general electives (to acquire 128 credits minimum)