Academics / Departments / Department of Physical Therapy & Athletic Training

Physical Therapy & Athletic Training Lab

The Physical Therapy & Athletic Training (PTAT) Lab at Sargent College is a unique, hands-on classroom that combines didactic and practical education. With equipment for up to 40 students (20 pairs) to learn examination and intervention strategies as well as a state-of-the-art media system, the lab offers an optimal learning environment.

Equipment

  • 20 state-of-the-art hi-low manual mobilization tables.
  • 6 high-definition 80-inch screens provide in-depth, close-up views of instructor demonstrations and learning materials. Multiple monitors throughout the room provide students maximum viewing capabilities from each station.
  • 6 high-definition cameras capture demonstrations from multiple angles throughout the lab;  these demonstrations can then be simulcast on our flat screens.
  • 6 video capture stations allow for immediate student review and reflection of psychomotor skill assessments.

Video Capture Technology – Key Features

PTAT 257The PTAT Lab features digital encoding devices which record video and allow for play back on our streaming server. As a result, students can be recorded during an in-class assessment, and within minutes, these videos are available for student review in an adjacent viewing room. This allows students to watch and reflect on the practical exams they’ve just completed — emphasizing critical reflection of performance, a key need in today’s healthcare environment. Alternatively, students can watch instructional or informative video before an assessment to review standardized preparatory information.

Additionally, simultaneous video capture throughout the lab facilitates precise movement analysis. This ability to display two views at once (e.g. PowerPoint slides plus a camera feed) allows us to combine didactic information with practical demonstration (e.g. reviewing the diagnostic value of certain techniques while watching the demonstration of the technique). Another option, the transmission of two views (side, front, etc.) of an individual on one screen allows for maximum analysis and diagnostic review.