Browse Spring 2018 Course Offerings below by language. 

The information below is subject to change.  For the most up-to-date information, please check the Student Link. Students are responsible for checking the course prerequisites, class meeting times, and class meeting locations. 

Information and instructors for Romance Studies advanced language courses (350+) is also available here for Spring 2018.


CAS LF 111| First-Semester French 

  • Sections A1-D1
  • Description: A multimedia approach for students who have never studied French. A variety of communicative tasks develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills.
  • Credits: 4

CAS LF 112| Second-Semester French 

  • Sections: A1-H1
  • Prerequisites: CAS LF 111 or placement test results.
  • Description: Continues CAS LF 111. A multimedia approach which develops speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills, together with the grammar and vocabulary needed for more complex communicative tasks.
  • Credits: 4 

CAS LF 211| Third-Semester French

  • Sections: A1-F1
  • Prerequisites: CAS LF 112 or placement test results
  • Description: Advances proficiency in speaking, writing, reading, and listening in a communicative classroom setting. Grammar studied is used in context through thematic discussions on topics ranging from daily life to Francophone culture, in short readings, and through diverse written tasks. 4 cr. Either sem.
  • Credits: 4

CAS LF 212| Fourth-Semester French

  • Sections: A1-F1
  • Prerequisites: CAS LF 211 or placement test results
  • Description: Advances proficiency in speaking, writing, reading, and listening in a communicative classroom setting. Grammar studied is used in context through thematic discussions on topics ranging from daily life to Francophone culture, in short readings, and through diverse written tasks. 
  • Credits: 4

CAS LF 305| Advanced Written Expression

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: At least one Level 1 Advanced course (CAS LF 303, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311)  or equivalent; or placement test results.
  • Description: Intensive study of the art of writing through translation exercises and development of individual style through readings, analysis of writing styles, free composition and class discussion.
  • Credits: 4 

CAS LF 306| Advanced Oral Expression 

  • Sections: A1,B1
  • Prerequisites: At least one Level 1 Advanced course (CAS LF 303, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311)  or equivalent; or placement test results.
  • Description:Advanced training in rapid and idiomatic French speech. Oral reports. Role playing; vocabulary building; targeted work on pronunciation, intonation, and aural comprehension. Lab required.
  • Credits: 4 

CAS LF 307| French Arts and Society 

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CAS LF 212 or equivalent; or placement test results
  • Description:Advanced study of French language through the analysis of a topic or theme in the arts and society. Students advance in speaking, reading, writing, and listening through the analysis of literary, historical, and cultural texts.
  • Credits: 4 

CAS LF 308| French Through Film and Media

  • Sections: A1, B1
  • Prerequisites: CAS LF 212 or equivalent; or placement test results
  • Description:With the goal of better understanding French and Francophone culture and society, students study various media forms that can include film, written and broadcast press, television, podcasts, blogs, and social media
  • Credits: 4 

CAS LF 309| French In the World

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CAS LF 212 or equivalent; or placement test results
  • Description:Advanced study of French through the analysis of images, short stories, excerpts of novels and films that address the relationship between France and its former colonies in West Africa.
  • Credits: 4

CAS LF 311| French Popular Culture

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CAS LF 212 or equivalent; or placement test results
  • Description:Advanced study of French through topics in popular culture.
  • Credits: 4

CAS LF 341| Contemporary Trends in French Culture and Society 

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: At least one Level 1 Advanced Course (CAS LF 303, 307, 308, 309, 310,311) or equivalent; or placement test results.
  • Description: Through current articles and headlines, films and songs, this class explores the meaning and preservation of French “Culture” while investigating areas of social debate from a French perspective. Designed for but not limited to students returning from abroad. 
  • Credits: 4

CAS LF 348| French Past to Post-Modern: French Civilization Through Film 

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites:Prereq: At least one Level 1 Advanced Course (CAS LF 303, 307, 308, 309, 310,311) or equivalent; or placement test results.
  • Description:Examines France’s classic cultural symbols and evolution from monarchy into the revolutionary nation that introduced notions of Liberty, Equality, and Fraternity. Survey of events in today’s post-modern and post-colonial state. Uses film, video, articles to explore contemporary culture and politics.
  • Credits:4

CAS LF 350| Introduction to Analysis of French Texts

  • Sections: A1, B1
  • Prerequisites: At least one Level 1 Advanced Course (CAS LF 303, 307, 308, 309, 310,311) or equivalent; or placement test results.
  • Description:Development of techniques for reading and interpreting French literary texts. Special attention to the study of lyric poetry, drama, and short narrative. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • Credits:4

CAS LF 351| Introduction to the French Novel

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLF350
  • Description:Close readings in the French novel from its origins to the nouveau roman. Attention to narration, themes, symbols, and schools. Investigation of the roman d’analyse, Romantic prose, realist fiction, and other types of narrative. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • Credits:4

CAS LF 453| The French Enlightenment: Theaters of Deception

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLF350
  • Description:Paradoxes of the theater. The theater in 17th and 18th century France held a paradoxical position. If one was really moved bythe emotions represented, how could one distinguish between being swayed by the craft of a good actor versus merely being duped and deceived? If the actor could put on different façades and convince an audience, was there a difference between the actor’s words and other forms of “convincing” speech, such as the savvy con artist’s swindle, the minister’s sermons, or the lover’s seductions? Although theater held a privileged place in relation to an all-powerful monarchy, because of the strength of its illusion-building, theater also held the potential to criticize other institutions that also relied on illusions, including the church and the state. This course investigates the paradox of the theater by looking at five plays of the period that comment on theatricality and deception. Literary analysis is supplemented by primary documents, including actors’ handbooks, treatises on set design, pamphlets on costume, color and seduction/prostitution, and more. Students may use these contexts to rehearse, stage and perform a scene from one of the plays. Authors may include: Corneille, Molière, Rotrou, Marivaux, DuBos, D’Aubignac and Diderot.
  • Credits:4

CAS LF 568| Topics in Literature and Film: Literature and Films from Senegal

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLF350 and one LF 400-level literature course, or consent of instructor.
  • Description:Close reading and discussion of selected French and/or Francophone texts and films. Readings on film theory and pertinent literary models prepare students for viewings of films.
  • Credits:4

CAS LF 569| Topics in Francophone Writing: Through a Writer’s Eye

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLF350 and one LF 400-level literature course, or consent of instructor.
  • Description:Traces the writer’s intimate reading itinerary through works of literature, science, and arts, and how these impact a critical or writerly practice. Each session includes a lecture followed by a discussion, all taught in French.
  • Credits:4

CAS LF 571| Topics in Nineteenth-Century French Literature: Women and Gender

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites:CASLF350 and one 400-level literature course.
  • Description:Representations of women and gender in works by major authors, such as Balzac, Zola,  and Baudelaire. Texts by lesser-known women authors, such as Claire de Duras and Rachilde, bring out similarities and differences in their representations of identity.
  • Credits:4

CAS LF 586| Introduction to the French Novel

  • Sections: A1
  • Description:Explores how European filmmakers have approached filmmaking more as a theoretical activity than as entertainment. Students learn the tools of cinematic analysis and apply them to a series of seminal (predominantly French) films, each suggesting a particular theory of film itself. Class conducted in English; films with subtitles.
  • Credits:4

CAS LF 860| Displacement, Migration, and Mobility in Francophone Artistic Production Today

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: N/A
  • Description:This course examines literary and filmic narratives on displacement, migration, and mobility, with a discussion of representation, borders, geographies, aesthetic transformations, and the critical discourses that have emerged in the process.
  • Credits:4

CAS LI 111| First-Semester Italian

  • Sections: A1, B1
  • Description:For students who have never studied Italian, or by placement test results. Introduction to grammatical structures used in written exercises. Emphasis on aural comprehension, speaking, and pronunciation. Readings on contemporary Italian culture. Meets four days a week. Lab required.
  • Credits:4

CAS LI 112| Second-Semester Italian

  • Sections: A1, B1, C1, D1,
  • Prerequisites: CASLI111 or placement test results.
  • Description:Continues study of basic grammatical structures used in written assignments. Emphasis on speaking, aural comprehension, and pronunciation. Readings on contemporary Italian culture. Meets four days a week. Lab required.
  • Credits:4

CAS LI 132| Beginning Italian II

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLI131 
  • Description:Specially designed for students in the College of Fine Arts. Continuation of CAS LI 131. Grammar; special attention to phonetics; reading and writing
  • Credits:4

CAS LI 211| Third-Semester Italian

  • Sections: A1, B1
  • Prerequisites: CASLI112 or placement test results
  • Description:Intended for students with a satisfactory background in elementary Italian who wish to continue study of grammatical structures. Emphasis on speaking, pronunciation, and aural comprehension. Reading about Italian culture and contemporary short stories. Compositions and oral assessments including interviews and/or presentations. Meets three days a week.
  • Credits:4

CAS LI 212| Fourth-Semester Italian

  • Sections: A1-C1
  • Prerequisites: CASLI211 or placement test results
  • Description:For students who wish to build active use of Italian in speaking, writing, and reading. Intensive practice of spoken and written language. More advanced readings from Italian culture. Writing involving more complex grammatical and syntactical patterns. Oral assessments including interviews and/or presentations. Meets three days a week. Satisfactory completion of CAS LI 212 fulfills the CAS language requirement.
  • Credits:4

CAS LI 312| Italian for the Professions

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLI212 or placement test results
  • Description:Advanced language course focusing on Italy’s influence on the fields of design, technology, science, fashion, and the culinary arts. Designed to deepen proficiency through analysis of videos, reading a variety of articles, biographical sketches, interviews, and writing assignments. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same number formerly entitled, “Italy on the Cutting Edge.” 
  • Credits:4

CAS LI 352| Italian Literature III: Modern Period

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLI211 or placement test results
  • Description:For students who wish to build active use of Italian in speaking, writing, and reading. Intensive practice of spoken and written language. More advanced readings from Italian culture. Writing involving more complex grammatical and syntactical patterns. Oral assessments including interviews and/or presentations. Meets three days a week. Satisfactory completion of CAS LI 212 fulfills the CAS language requirement.
  • Credits:4

CAS LI 473| The Masters of Italian Cinema

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLI311 or CASLI312 or CASLI313
  • Description:The creative work of Fellini, Visconti, Antonioni, Bertolucci, and De Sica as expressions of a specific cultural perspective on Italian life of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Additional focus on several novels and screen plays that have influenced the work of the directors. Also offered as CAS CI 460.
  • Credits:4

CAS LI 590| Topics in Modern Italian Literature and Criticism 

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CC102 or LI555 or consent of the instructor. 
  • Description: Spring 2018 Topic-Dante’s Divine Comedy: Purgatorio and Paradiso .Readings include Dante’s Divine Comedy, the Purgatory and Paradise, in English translation with accompanying original Italian text. Building on the first volume, Inferno, to develop familiarity with Dante’s poetics, theology, philosophy, and politics. Italian not required, class conducted in English.
  • Credits:4

(List Portuguese Classes here)

CAS LP 112| Second-Semester Portuguese

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLP111 or consent of instructor.
  • Description:Covers the important grammar points not studied in CAS LP 111. Further develops the four communicative skills while expanding students’ background knowledge of the history and cultures of the Portuguese- speaking world. Lab required. Four hours weekly.
  • Credits:4

CAS LP 212| Topics in Modern Italian Literature and Criticism 

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLP211 or consent of instructor.
  • Description:Review of the grammar and syntax of Portuguese. Further develops reading, writing, and conversational competency while expanding students’ knowledge of history and culture. Conducted in Portuguese. Fulfills the CAS language requirement.
  • Credits:4

CAS LP 307|Portuguese for Business and Professional Life

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLP212 and consent of instructor. 
  • Description:This course emphasizes cultural and linguistic competence in professional, business-oriented settings. It is designed to provide students with advanced proficiency in Portuguese while exploring different aspects of the culture and professional life of the Brazilian and the Portuguese-speaking world. 
  • Credits:4

CAS LP 312| Inventing Brazil (in English Translation) 

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: N/A
  • Description:Exploration of several cultural realms, tropes, and intellectual disciplines— literature, history, art, film, sociology, anthropology— that situate Brazil within Western modernity. Focus in Spring 2016 is on important figures, concepts, and debates that forged the national image of Brazil.
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 111| First-Semester Spanish

  • Sections: A1-F1
  • Description:For students who have never studied Spanish, or by placement test results. Introduction to grammatical structures. Emphasis on aural comprehension, speaking, and pronunciation. Introduction to Hispanic culture. Lab required.
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 112| Second-Semester Spanish

  • Sections: A1-H1
  • Prerequisites: CASLS111 or placement test results.
  • Description:Completes study of basic grammatical structures. Emphasis on speaking and aural comprehension. Readings on contemporary Hispanic culture. Writing assignments. Lab required.
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 211| Third-Semester Spanish

  • Sections: A1-H1, J1
  • Prerequisites: CASLS112 or placement test results.
  • Description:Completes study of grammatical structures of Spanish. Use of spoken language in conversation. Reading in Hispanic civilization and of contemporary short stories. Writing exercises involving more complex grammatical and syntactical patterns. Credits:4

CAS LS 212| Fourth-Semester Spanish

  • Sections: A1-H2, J1, K1, L1, M1
  • Prerequisites: CASLS212 or placement test results.
  • Description:Review of the structures of Spanish. Intensive practice of spoken language. More advanced readings from Hispanic culture. Frequent compositions. Satisfactory completion of CAS LS 212 fulfills the CAS language requirement.
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 306| Spanish Translation

  • Sections: A1,
  • Prerequisites: CASLS212 or Spanish SAT subject test score of 560 or higher, or placement test results.
  • Description:Advanced study of the Spanish language through the translation of written texts. Analysis of the theory and practice of translation as a catalyst of cultural transfer. Taught in Spanish. 
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 307| Spanish Literature and the Arts

  • Sections: A1-D1
  • Prerequisites: CASLS212 or Spanish SAT subject test score of 560 or higher, or placement test results.
  • Description:Not open to students for whom Spanish is a first language. We focus on original works written by journalists, authors of fiction, comic artists, psychologists and criminologists.
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 308| Spanish Film and Media

  • Sections: A1-C1
  • Prerequisites: CASLS212 or Spanish SAT subject test score of 560 or higher, or placement test results.
  • Description:Not open to students for whom Spanish is a first language. Advanced study of the Spanish language through the analysis of films and media of the Spanish-speaking world: cinema, the internet, and social media. 
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 309| Composition for Native Spanish Speakers

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: Open only to native or near-native speakers of Spanish. Not open to students who have completed any 300-level Spanish Language course. 
  • Description:Open only to students whose home language is Spanish but whose education has been in English. This course aims to enrich the learner’s cultural, formal, and academic knowledge of Spanish through compositions, oral presentations, short stories, and film.
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 310| Spanish for the Professions

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLS212 or Spanish SAT subject test score of 560 or higher, or placement test results. 
  • Description:Not open to students for whom Spanish is a first language.Advanced study of Spanish as used in the professions in the Spanish-speaking world. Analysis and discussion of intercultural professional communication, acquisition of specialized vocabulary. 
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 311| Spanish through Performance: The Theater of Everyday Life

  • Sections: A1, X1
  • Prerequisites: CASLS212 or Spanish SAT subject test score of 560 or higher; or placement test results. 
  • Description:Not open to students for whom Spanish is a first language. 
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 350| Introduction to Analysis of Hispanic Texts

  • Sections: A1, B1, C1
  • Prerequisites: any 300-level Spanish language course or placement exam results. 
  • Description:  Development of techniques for reading and interpreting Hispanic literary texts; reading of lyric poetry, drama, and fictional narrative. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 450| Contemporary Spanish Literature

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites:  CASLS350
  • Description:  Recent Spanish fiction: memory and the Civil War. A reading of recent Spanish works, dealing with the topic of the Spanish Civil War and its presence in contemporary Spain. Authors included are: Francisco Ayala, Javier Cercas, Isaac Rosa, Almudena Grandes.
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 452| Nobel Prize Winning Writers of Spanish America

  • Sections: B1
  • Prerequisites: CASLS350
  • Description:  A Survey Course will center on representative works—prose fiction and poetry—by Spanish America’s winners of the Nobel Prize for Literature:  Gabriela Mistral, Miguel Ángel Asturias, Pablo Neruda, Gabriel García Márquez, Octavio Paz, and Mario Vargas Llosa.
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 456| Spanish Medieval and Golden Age Literature

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLS350
  • Description: A linguistic approach to medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque writers. Dynamic interaction between literature and the development of the Spanish language. Focus on crucial moments in Spain’s cultural and linguistic history.
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 507| The Sounds of Spanish

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLX250 AND one LS 300-level language course; or consent of instructor.
  • Description:Introduction to Spanish phonetics and phonology. Covers articulatory, acoustic, and auditory phonetics, focusing on techniques for visualizing speech sounds. Examines the phonemic inventory and phonological organization of Spanish from several perspectives, including generative and articulatory phonology as well as sociolinguistics. Conducted in Spanish. Also offered as CAS LX 383 and GRS LX 683.
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 579| Topics in  Hispanic Cinemas: Cuban Experimental and Revolutionary Cinema

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLS350
  • Description: This course is an overview of Cuban cinema after the revolution of 1959. It focuses particularly on the forging of a new cinematic language from the Third World. Filmmakers studied: Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, Nicolás Guillén Landrián, Sara Gómez, among others.
  • Credits:4

CAS LS 580| Mexico City in Literature and Film

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisites: CASLS350 and two LS 400-level courses.
  • Description:This course explores urban experience in Mexico City from the literary, the cinematic and the theoretical perspective. Focus on literary and filmic discourses about this city during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Authors include Gutierrez Najera, Bunuel, and Ripstein.
  • Credits:4

LS 850| Seminar: Topics in Hispanic Literature- Vallejo and Magritte

  • Sections: A1
  • Description: An exploration of the affinities and crossings in the poetics and creative work of these two contemporary artists in the context of European Avant-garde esthetic and political transformations.
  • Credits:4

LS 850|Seminar: Topics in Hispanic Literature- The Game of Theory   

  • Sections: B1
  • Description: Poetry, fiction and essays representing utopias, parodies of authoritarian discourses about meaning, moral outrage, political lessons .The seminar examines as well the tradition of street philosophers in urban art and literature. Works by Borges, Cortázar, Venturini, Aira, Arlt, García Márquez, Sarduy, Arenas, among others.
  • Credits:4

LL 690|Proficiency-Based Language Teaching 1

  • Sections: A1
  • Prerequisite: Graduate Standing
  • Description: Introduces students to current language teaching methodologies and effective proficiency- and standards- based instruction. Students develop their own pedagogy projects with appropriate assessment parameters addressing all four language skills. 
  • Credits:4

LL 691|Proficiency-Based Language Teaching 1

  • Sections: F1,S1
  • Prerequisite: GRS LL 690 or consent of instructor.
  • Description: Fosters professional outlook on language teaching and learning. Students deepen their knowledge of instructional technologies, further develop proficiency-based pedagogy projects for their own courses, and prepare teaching philosophies, conference presentations, and other portfolio materials. 
  • Credits:2

LL 699|Teaching College Languages I

  • Sections: F1,M1,S1
  • Description: The goals, contents, and methods of instruction in languages. General teaching-learning issues. Required of all teaching fellows.
  • Credits:2

 

Click here to view course offerings for the Linguistics Program!