Working with Nonhuman Primate Tissue

Employees working with nonhuman primate tissue have a more controlled environment, thus reduced risk for infection from nonhuman primate contact. Most contact is due to accidents in the laboratory. Therefore, it is recommended that universal precautions be practiced at all times. Thorough hand washing should be done before and after gloving. Nonhuman primate tissue should not be handled without gloves. Eye protection should be worn to prevent exposure from splashes. In some cases, clothing covers should also be utilized. All researchers working with nonhuman primate tissue must be evaluated and educated at an occupational health service.
Tissue, blood, and body fluids from nonhuman primates pose numerous problems. Cercopithecine Herpes virus-1 or B Virus is a member of the herpes family occurring naturally in macaque, rhesus, cynomolgus, and possibly other old world monkeys. It can be found in neurologic tissue, CSF, ocular, oral, or genital fluid secretions. B virus has never been cultured in blood. Due to the extreme morbidity and mortality of this infection in humans, special effort is taken to ensure prompt evaluation and first aid following potential exposure to B Virus.
Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) commonly persists without clinical manifestations in nonhuman primates.
Type D Retroviruses (Simian retroviruses [SRV]) may infect some nonhuman primates. However, there is no current evidence on humans being infected with the type D retroviruses.
Injuries involving contact with nonhuman primate blood are potentially hazardous. Each researcher working with NHP or their tissues is required to store serum for future reference.

First aid for injuries related to exposure to nonhuman primates or their tissues is always handled as an emergency. First aid should be performed before seeking medical care unless the injury is severe. See paragraphs below. Follow-up immediately with ROHP at 617-414-7647
For puncture and lacerations with a contaminated instrumentCleanse the wound immediately with a Betadine sponge scrub for 15 minutes. Rinse thoroughly. Notify the employee’s supervisor and the veterinarian responsible for the animal.
For a splash of potentially contaminated fluid to the nose, mouth, or eyes: Flush the site for 15 minutes with water or saline solution. Notify the employee’s supervisor and the veterinarian responsible for the animal.

For additional information concerning the Animal Exposure Surveillance Program (AESP) for exposure to nonhuman primate tissue, contact ROHP at 617-414-7647.

Description of Common Non-Human Primate Procedures at BUMC and Required Eye/Face Personal

Protective Equipment

Procedure

Eye/Face/Mucous Membrane Protection

Alternative, if available

NHP Cage Changing

goggles and surgical mask

safety glasses, face shield and surgical mask

NHP dental cleaning

goggles and surgical mask

n/a

NHP Live Animal Transport or Removal to Transport Cage

goggles and surgical mask

safety glasses, face shield and surgical mask

Anesthetized NHP Animal transport

goggles and surgical mask

safety glasses, face shield and surgical mask

NHP Surgery on Anesthetized Animal using Surgical Microscope

Safety Glasses (prescription if needed) with Surgical Loupes, Surgical Mask for Lead Surgeon, All surgical assistants in room should wear goggles and surgical mask

Lead surgeon currently wearing prescription eyeglasses with side shields and surgical loupes over the glasses with a surgical mask. Alternatively, surgical assistants can wear safety glasses, face shield, and surgical mask

NHP Surgery on Anesthetized Animal using Surgical Loupes

Safety Glasses (prescription if needed) with Surgical Loupes, Surgical Mask for Lead Surgeon, All surgical assistants in room should wear goggles and surgical mask

Lead surgeon currently wearing prescription eyeglasses with side shields and surgical loupes over the glasses with a surgical mask. Alternatively, surgical assistants can wear safety glasses, face shield, and surgical mask

Tracheal Tube Insertion and Removal during the beginning and end of NHP Surgery

goggles and surgical mask

safety glasses (prescription if needed), face shield and surgical mask

Perfusion of NHP at Termination Surgery

Completed in Fume Hood by Lead Surgeon: Involves slicing of heart ventricles, NHP anesthetized

Completed in Fume Hood by Lead Surgeon: Currently wears prescription eyeglasses and surgical loupes and surgical mask

Magnetic Resonance Imaging of NHP Anesthetized Animal

Anesthetized animals in sealed microisolator cage, safety glasses and surgical mask should be worn

n/a