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Kecia Ali in CAS arts&sciences Magazine

December 7th, 2015 in Uncategorized.

The Illusion of Clashing Civilizations

The Lives of MuhammadFaculty books examine changing depictions of the Prophet Muhammad and equality in teaching

By Michelle Samuels

IN LATE SPRING 2015, armed anti-Muslim demonstrators drew cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad outside a mosque in Phoenix, Arizona. Kecia Ali followed the incident, which made headlines worldwide, with keen interest. “Clearly, Muhammad remains a flashpoint in the current American climate,” says Ali, an associate professor of religion and author of The Lives of Muhammad (Harvard University Press, 2014). The book is a biography of biographies, showing how depictions of the Prophet by believers and non-believers alike have evolved over 14 centuries. read more………

CAS arts&sciences Magazine, Why America Can’t Separate Religion & Politics

December 7th, 2015 in Uncategorized.

Religion and PoliticsAnd what that means for the 2016 elections

By Julie Butters

 

If he were running for president today, Thomas Jefferson would not be elected. Strip away glaring anachronisms like slaveholding, along with his poor public speaking skills, and Jefferson would still struggle in the polls. The reason would be obvious to the current field of candidates: Jefferson was an ardent critic of organized religion, says Bruce J. Schulman, William E. Huntington Professor of History. Read more.………

Anthony Petro in BU Today

December 4th, 2015 in Uncategorized.

How the AIDS Crisis Became a Moral Debate

CAS prof’s new book, After the Wrath of God, traces the evolution

By: Rich Barlow

afterthewrathofgodEven gay journalists and activists abetted ill-informed efforts to link AIDS to promiscuity, Anthony Petro writes in his new book. Photo courtesy of Petro

In 1993, the Reverend Billy Graham asked an audience rhetorically, “Is AIDS a judgment of God?” He then answered his own question: “I could not say for sure, but I think so.” Read more….

 

12/7 – After Paris: Anti-Muslim Backlash, What You Need To Know

December 3rd, 2015 in Uncategorized.

A TOWN HALL MEETING FEATURING
SUSANNAH HESCHEL -ELI BLACK PROFESSOR OF JEWISH STUDIES, DARTMOUTH COLLEGE
PAMELA LIGHTSEY -ASSOCIATE DEAN, SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY
STEPHEN PROTHERO -PROFESSOR OF RELIGION, CAS
MODERATED BY KENN ELMORE -DEAN OF STUDENTS

2015 after paris image
The tragic events in Paris of a few weeks ago have provoked not only an outpouring of support for France but also a troubling upsurge in anti-Muslim action in the USA and elsewhere. This open forum invites experts on racism, the marginalization of religious minorities, and anti-Semitism to place anti-Muslim rhetoric, and the violent acts that these words can provoke, within a broader political, religious, and social framework. Panelists will speak briefly, followed by plenty of time for questions.

6-7PM ON MONDAY- DECEMBER 7 2015
GSU CONFERENCE AUDITORIUM 2ND FLOOR – BOSTON MA

sponsored by
THE DEAN OF STUDENTS OFFICE
THE DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION
THE ELIE WIESEL CENTER FOR JEWISH STUDIES
THE INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF MUSLIM SOCIETIES & CIVILIZATIONS
THE SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY

John Kerry on Religion and Diplomacy

September 8th, 2015 in Uncategorized.

“I often say that if I headed back to college today, I would major in comparative religions rather than political science.”

Toward a better understanding of religion and global affairs
John KerryOne of the most interesting challenges we face in global diplomacy today is the need to fully understand and engage the great impact that a wide range of religious traditions have on foreign affairs. I often say that if I headed back to college today, I would major in comparative religions rather than political science. That is because religious actors and institutions are playing an influential role in every region of the world and on nearly every issue central to U.S. foreign policy. Read more.

Three Department of Religion Professors featured in Upcoming Gitner Lecture.

August 21st, 2015 in Uncategorized.

Gitner Poster-22x28-FINAL-2015Join Kecia Ali, Associate Professor of Religion, as she presents the second annual College of Arts & Sciences Gitner Family Lecture, “Contesting Muhammad: Contemporary Controversies in Historical Perspective.”
The Prophet’s life story has been told from the earliest days of Islam to the present, by both Muslims and non-Muslims, in myriad ways.

Since the nineteenth century, hagiographic and polemical writings have merged into a single, contentious, story, usually devoting substantial attention to Muhammad’s relationships with women, especially his first wife, Khadija, and his young favorite, Aisha. Modern Muslim accounts of these marriages arose in tandem and in tension with Western depictions, and were shaped by new ideas about religion, sexuality, and marriage.

Exploring these contested images of Muhammad as a husband illuminates key forces at play in contemporary thinking about this vital figure.

Respondents will include Stephen Prothero, Professor of Religion, and Teena Purohit, Assistant Professor of Religion.

When: Thursday, September 17, 2015
6 p.m.
Where: The Tsai Performance Center
685 Commonwealth Ave.
Boston, MA
Price: Complimentary

Register Today!

ASL interpretation will be provided. For additional access, please contact Sarah Speltz at smspeltz@bu.edu.

The Tsai Performance Center is easily accessible by public transportation: Green Line B, BU Central stop.  This event is free and open to the public.

Frank Korom elected to the American Institute of Indian Studies Board of Trustees.

August 10th, 2015 in Uncategorized.

Frank Korom has been elected to be a member of the American Institute of Indian Studies Board of Trustees. AIIS is a consortium of universities dedicated to the study of Indian languages and cultures. It is the largest funder of research and language study in India. He has also been appointed to the Artist Selection Committee of the International Folk Art Alliance , which organizes and oversees the annual International Folk Art Market in Santa Fe. He will be responsible for covering Asia and the Middle East in this capacity. In addition, he has been made Chair of the jury that selects the best first book in the history of religions, an annual prize awarded by the American Academy of Religion.

GDRS Alumnus Appointed Sultan of Oman Fellow in Islamic Studies at Oxford University

July 20th, 2015 in Uncategorized.

Feener

Michael Feener, a GDRS Alumnus and an expert on Islamic jurisprudence and Indonesian culture, has recently been appointed as the Sultan of Oman Fellow in Islamic Studies at Oxford University. Dr. Feener studied with emeritus professor Merlin Swartz and wrote his dissertation on law reform in Indonesia, which became his first book. He currently teaches in the history department of the National University of Singapore. Congratulations and good luck Dr. Feener!

Anthony Petro’s new book already getting reviews!

July 1st, 2015 in Uncategorized.

On Anthony Petro’s After the Wrath of God: AIDS, Sexuality, and American Religion (Oxford University Press, 2015).

afterthewrathofgodBy Ann Neumann

In December 1987—nine years after a rare syndrome was first identified in young men in major cities across the US and five years after it was given the name AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome)—the United States Catholic Conference (USCC) released “The Many Faces of AIDS,” a document meant to “confront a significant pastoral issue.” More than thirteen thousand Americans had already died of AIDS. Another three hundred thousand would die over the next decade. …more.

Shari Rabin (Religion alum 2009) 2014 Kaiserman Summer Fellow

May 26th, 2015 in Uncategorized.

shari-rubin-photo-150x150
Posts By: Ariella Y. Werden-Greenfield

Shari Rabin, a PhD candidate at Yale University is the 2014 Kaiserman Summer Fellow.  Her dissertation, “Manifest Jews: Mobility and the Making of American Judaism, 1820-1877,” argues that American Judaism was not formed in twentieth century cities, but rather was a product of nineteenth century mobility and dispersion. Whereas in Europe Jews suffered severe residency and travel restrictions, in the United States migrants were confronted with an expanding frontier in which there were few limitations on movement, but a host of challenges for the practice of traditional Judaism. The eclectic religious practices of mobile Jews throughout the continent, along with various attempts by local and national leaders to foster order and consistency, resulted in new institutional and ideological modes intended to make Judaism compatible with the mobile American environment.

http://www.cla.temple.edu/feinsteincenter/author/tua68262/page/3/