Got a brilliant start-up idea in your back pocket? The Entrepreneurship concentration will help you make it a reality.

Directed by the BUZZ Lab in conjunction with the Strategy & Innovation department, theFull-Time MBA Entrepreneurship  concentration will help you think like an entrepreneur and understand how to increase your project’s chance of success. The skills you gain build on general MBA content to help you to create value in an entrepreneurial context, whether it’s a new venture, an existing firm, a social enterprise, or a foreign market.

In addition, the Entrepreneurship concentration can be combined with the Health Sector MBA, Social Impact MBA, or MBA+ MS in Digital innovation programs, or with one of our other concentrations such as finance, marketing, or strategy & innovation.  The choice is yours – you’ll receive a personalized degree because we give you the freedom to tailor it to fit your goals.

Required Courses (2)

Students must take at least two of the following courses:

  • Social Entrepreneurship (QSTPL850)

    The Social Entrepreneurship course is designed to: (1) explore the concepts, practices, opportunities, and challenges of social entrepreneurship; (2) provide frameworks and tools that will help students be more effective in this sector; and (3) provide an opportunity for students to create a business plan for a new social enterprise or an income-generating initiative of a nonprofit organization. In the business plan project, student teams will partner with external organizations. Students will identify and analyze opportunities, resources, and risks and apply skills from marketing, accounting, organizational behavior, strategy and other disciplines. Special emphasis will be placed on aspects of business planning and organizational strategy that are particularly challenging or distinctive in the social sector, including mission definition, leadership, organizational structure, raising capital, and measuring results.

  • Starting New Ventures (QSTSI852)

    This course focuses on the process of identifying and obtaining the necessary resources to launch an entrepreneurial venture through the development of a business plan. A well-written business plan will communicate the business concept in a way that attracts the various resource providers necessary for the venture's success. Students will individually develop a business concept and prepare and present a professional business plan.

  • Entrepreneurship (QSTSI855)

    The course is a comprehensive introduction to the entrepreneurial process from idea generation through venture launch and later growth. Initial lectures and case studies focus on idea generation and concept feasibility along with the skills, competencies and perspectives entrepreneurs must develop to manage the organization through each phase of development. Later lectures and cases emphasize the issues faced by entrepreneurs in scaling innovative enterprises; use of strategic alliances, attracting funding and managing investors, managing growth expansion and choosing among exit options.

Elective Courses (2)

Students must take two courses selected from the following list. Students may also count additional courses from the list above towards their two electives. To give students guidance on class selection, electives have been grouped into functional tracks. Students should select electives that best suit their professional interests, and are, therefore, encouraged to meet with faculty in the Entrepreneurship Department to discuss their course options.

Financing Ventures

  • Private Equity: Leveraged Buyouts (QSTFE850)

    Private Equity (PE) is a major force in the capital markets, acquiring household names such as Dell, Toys R Us, Neilson, Nieman Marcus, and many more. This course exposes students to, and de-mystifies, the PE world. The focus is centered on LBOs and their position in the alternative asset class. Students learn about the activities of PE firms including formation, fundraising, investing (deal structure, terms, due diligence, governance) and exiting. We also discuss how other industry sectors serve or are affected by PE and who the players are. This is a capstone course that integrates marketing, strategy and finance to further the understanding of business evaluation. Case study and class participation are the primary modes of learning. Course offered jointly with undergraduate course SMG FE 450.

  • Entrepreneurial Finance (QSTFE854)

    The focus of FE854 is on the development of financial and business skills to identify, evaluate, start and manage new ventures. A comprehensive understanding of finance is an essential ingredient in the "recipe" for business success. No longer can the assumptions underlying financial projections be treated as "black boxes." In many cases, the answer is less important than the analytical process used to calculate it. Readings for the course will primarily be in the form of case studies, and will be supplemented by guest speakers, presentations, and readings from academia and industry.

International Entrepreneurship

  • Engaging Consumers in a Digital World (QSTMK845)

    Social media technologies are continuously transforming the ways consumers interact with each other and firms. These changes constitute a fundamental shift in the marketplace--consumers have greater opportunities to voice their opinions and connect with other consumers as well as increased influence over marketers and brands. In this course, we examine how organizations capitalize on social media and these consumer-to-consumer interactions to support their marketing efforts. Specifically, we'll examine (a) how social media can be used to listen to consumers and monitor their behavior; (b) developing and delivering content that engages consumers; and (c) how to track the effectiveness of these efforts. Finally, we'll explore how to manage both the internal and external dimensions of social media engagement. We view these issues from a strategic and a practical perspective, rather than a technical or platform perspective. We examine these topics using a hands-on approach, including live cases, personal engagement in social media, and a team project.

  • Clean Technologies and Supply Chains (QSTOM845)

    The clean technology industry is one of the largest sectors of the economy and yet still undergoing significant growth and attracting a plethora of new entrants. It has been characterized by a great deal of experimentation around new technologies and around business models in the face of regulatory and market place disruptions. The course uses a combination of cases, simulation and analytical exercises to review trends and their co-evolution within the clean technology/energy eco-system. It aims to build a skill set around risk and opportunity assessment, and allied implementation challenges. This course is aligned with the requirements of the Entrepreneurship, PNP and Strategy concentrations.

  • International Entrepreneurship (QSTSI856)

    No matter where you work, a small young venture or a large mature firm, your company will soon be sourcing from, selling to, partnering with, or owned by a foreign company. In your entrepreneurially-minded role in a new venture, corporation, or social enterprise, the international dimension of business looms large. In this course, we will explore how entrepreneurship differs by country and how and why context matters in the ability to start and grow new ventures. Next, you will take a concept from a domestic setting and explore why you would expand to other countries, where to expand to and what information you need about that foreign market, who you need to know to make that expansion successful, how to expand to that market, and when expansion can be most successful. Cases and readings will support the development of a foreign market entry plan to help make you a successful international entrepreneur.

Social Enterprises

  • Leading the Mission-Driven Organization (QSTOB830)

    Mission-driven organizations are created in order to accomplish goals that extend beyond profits for stakeholders and owners. Missions vary, ranging from, among many others, improving health care, providing meaningful work opportunities, educating or protecting youth, safeguarding the planet, eradicating poverty, building sustainable organizations, and enabling spirituality. Such missions occur in the context of various organizations, including non-profit and for-profit, philanthropic and religious, public and private, governmental and non-governmental. This course focuses on leadership theories, frameworks, and practices that take seriously the nature of workers, including both professional staff and volunteers, and their reasons for choosing to work in such organizations. This course is designed to build the capacities of students to use specific tools related to leadership, conflict, and change that are particularly useful in leading mission- driven organizations, and enable them to develop particular insights about specific mission-driven organizations of interest, related to their effectiveness and capacities for change.

  • Managing Organizational Change (QSTOB844)

    In this course, we will explore the theory and practice of creating organizational change, with an emphasis on how "insiders" can create desired organizational change. By the end of the course, students should be more capable facilitators of change; sensitive to the nuances of change and more knowledgeable and wise about its enactment. To enable this, we will examine how people recognize challenges in situations and possibilities for change, and adopt an experimental and deliberative attitude to try and solve them. When successful, such collective initiatives encourage meaningful contribution of stakeholders, foster human development and achieve organizational outcomes. The course sessions will be highly experiential. We will confront situations of change via simulations, exercises, personal projects, and team-based organizational projects. We will connect these experiences of change with theories of change to generate a richer understanding of the mechanisms of change at our disposal, and the integrative/disintegrative conditions that shape change trajectories. This course is particularly relevant for those wishing to develop their leadership and consultation capabilities.

  • The Leadership Challenge (QSTOB848)

    This course examines the essence of leadership; its relationship to managing; and the behaviors, attitudes and perspectives that distinguish leaders. Leadership is considered in a variety of ways: leadership in crises, at the top, in the middle, and in groups. Case studies, students' past experiences, instruments, and other learning activities provide opportunities for students to assess and develop their leadership talents.

  • Negotiations (QSTOB853)

    This course uses the theory and research on effective negotiating strategies to build students' understanding of, and skills for, managing differences and negotiation situations. The course considers, among other topics, the issues of negotiating across functions, between levels, across national and cultural differences, over race and gender differences, and between organizations. Students examine: 1) problems of influence and self-defense in highly competitive "hardball" negotiations; and 2) the art of using differences for creative problem-solving and "mutual gain" outcomes. The emphasis is on developing practical skills for effective negotiations that can be applied to concrete situations. Students should be prepared to learn from their own experiences and practice in this course.

Health Care and Life Sciences

  • Health Sector Issues and Opportunities (QSTHM703)

    This course provides a dynamic introduction to the health sector, beginning with the burden and distribution of disease and current patterns of expenditures. While the emphasis will be on the American system, a global context will be developed. The basic elements of insurance and payment, service delivery, and life sciences products will be described, and put in the context of the unique economic structure of the sector. The intense challenges of the sector will be explored, as well as both the ethical issues presented and the opportunities that emerge. Public policy and technological and practice development as drivers of change will be addressed throughout.

  • Health Service Delivery: Strategies, Solutions and Execution (QSTHM710)

    The overarching theme of this course is health care organizational transformation. The course will provide knowledge and skills needed to develop and implement high performing health care systems capable of delivering accessible, high quality, efficient services. It will draw upon relevant information from disciplinary areas of study including strategy, operations, marketing, finance, law, human resources, quality improvement, and information technology.

  • Drugs, Devices and Diagnostics: New Challenges, Strategies and Execution (QSTHM717)

    This course will examine issues and opportunities in life sciences including the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, medical devices sectors and the life sciences service industry supporting these sectors, through the eyes of the CEO. The course will investigate who manages these companies and what are the strategies that are used to build successful enterprises. This course will introduce students to individuals and institutions at every stage of the development cycle from idea generation and start-up fundraising to manufacturing and global expansion. We will specifically look at key elements of strategy and the execution of that strategy by examining companies that have either succeeded or failed, by discussing the pros and cons of different approaches and teasing out the lessons one can derive from leaders in the field and case studies examining their approaches.

  • Bench-to-Bedside: Translating Biomedical Innovation from the Laboratory to the Marketplace (QSTHM801)

    The subject of the course is the translation of medical technologies into new products and services for the healthcare system. The course begins with a rigorous study of university research commercialization including intellectual property, licensing and planning, creating, funding and building new entrepreneurial ventures. Concepts and tools are presented for assessing new technologies and their potential to be the basis for commercialization. Comparisons will be made of how technologies can be sourced and commercialized out of three very different environments: universities, national laboratories and corporate laboratories. Cross-disciplinary teams of students will be formed which will evaluate translational research projects currently being developed at Boston University and their potential for commercialization, providing a unique linkage between the scientific research activities of the university and the professional schools. Each week there will be a case study which will discuss examples of both success and failure in technology commercialization. Some of these case studies examine Boston University life sciences spin-out companies, and the founders and CEO's of these ventures will share their experiences with the class.

  • Health Information Technology (QSTHM817)

    This course helps prepare students for positions working in the rapidly growing field of information technology for health care delivery and life sciences organizations. With increasing demands for improved quality and efficiency, information technology has become essential to manage health care organizations and systems. The course will investigate frameworks and methods that can be used to develop digital health technology as well as to evaluate information systems, determine system requirements, facilitate effective use of health informatics, and plan system changes to meet future requirements. The perspective of the course is that of the chief information officer, chief medical information officer, other managers, clinicians, and users of both clinical and administrative health care information systems, not that of the technical specialist.

Innovation & Product Development

  • Platforms and Information Markets (QSTIS827)

    To thrive in the modern economy, managers, entrepreneurs and investors need a thorough understanding of platform businesses. Indeed, today's most powerful and valuable firms, from Airbnb, to Amazon, Facebook and Salesforce, operate as platforms connecting buyers and sellers, or users and advertisers, or users and third-party developers. These platforms derive their value from network effects and the ability to harness innovation from their users. Drawing on cases from social media, entrepreneurship, enterprise software, mobile services, and consumer products, we will analyze and learn to launch platform startups, convert existing businesses into platforms, and compete in a platform-centric world. Students will learn to apply concepts from industrial economics, market design, and game theory to real problems.

  • Consumer Insights (QSTMK856)

    Marketing, in particular, begins and ends with the consumer -- from determining consumer needs to ensuring customer satisfaction. In this course, we will explore the most recent scientific research in marketing, psychology, and behavioral economics related to consumer behavior. We will develop your ability to understand and influence what people want, how people decide what and when to buy, and whether people will be satisfied or dissatisfied with their decisions. These psychological insights are particularly useful for marketing strategy, brand positioning, and marketing communication decisions, but also yield insight into common biases in judgment and decision making, beyond marketing, to which you would otherwise fall prey. Why people are willing to drive across town to save $5 on a tank of gasoline, for example, when they would not drive a minute to save $5 on a refrigerator. We will discuss some of these applications in class. In addition, we will examine the methodology of market research (specific to consumer behavior) to build the tools you will need to interpret and base decisions on it. Readings will include primary empirical research articles (e.g., Journal of Consumer Research articles), business journal articles, and research reviews (e.g., Harvard Business Review articles). The course includes lecture, discussion, an exam, and a team term project.

  • Idea Lab (QSTOM865)

    This is an experiential course aimed at developing ideas for digital products and services ("web services"), within the context of a multi-stage "innovation tournament." The tournament structure will force the screening of certain ideas in the initial stages, and in such cases, some students will get reassigned to the surviving ideas. Participants will learn specific tools, methods, and concepts related to the creation of such services (e.g., opportunity sensing, management of variation, innovation/business analytics, crowd sourcing vs out sourcing decisions, existing versus incremental enabling technologies, idea interdependence and information architecture, task sequencing for enhancing cycle time and service quality) and will be required to develop web based test tools. The instructor anticipates that the best performing ideas will have high potential for entrepreneurial development. Thus, this course can serve as a front end to conduct follow-on development by working either in the IS, operations, health sector management, energy or entrepreneurship concentration courses, and/or by working with affinity groups in the BU community, such as, ITEC. Participants will be expected to read assigned material on visualization of ideas, and engage in the generation of promising ideas prior to starting this class. Make sure you have basic familiarity with how the web works. You need not be technical, nor have deep experience with the web development. Rather, you simply should understand the basic ideas behind URLs, HTML, and how web browsers work. You can figure this out by reading the Wikipedia entry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Wide_Web). We will also provide you with a mock-up of a typical website along with a tutorial on how to upload and edit this web site.

  • Product Design and Development (QSTOM880)

    This course explores central managerial challenges in the effective design, development, and introduction of new products. Topics covered include reducing the time to market while meeting cost and quality targets; managing cross-functional projects and inherent technological risks while keeping a focus on customer requirements; and integrated problem-solving by industrial designers, engineers, manufactures, and marketing specialists. [Case studies, readings, guest lecturers, field project]

  • Intellectual Property Strategies (QSTSI814)

    This course covers the ways in which companies use intellectual property to protect their investments in knowledge assets. Traditionally a concern for technology-intensive businesses, patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets have become important business tools throughout the knowledge-based economy. A good understanding of what IP assets are and how they work has become essential for managers in all types of organizations. This is not a law course, nor a how-to manual rather it is intended to develop your analytical understanding of fundamental economic and legal aspects of intellectual property systems, and how they drive competition and strategy.

  • Technology Commercialization and Entrepreneurship: Essential Tools for the New Entrepreneur (QSTSI838)

    This course addresses the innovative transformation of knowledge into new commercial products and services. The course begins with a rigorous study of intellectual property, licensing and the core aspects of planning, creating, funding and building new entrepreneurial ventures. Concepts and tools are presented for assessing new technologies and their potential to be the basis for a new entrepreneurial venture. Comparisons will be made of how technologies can be sourced and commercialized out of three very different environments: universities, national laboratories and corporate laboratories. Cross-disciplinary teams of students will be formed which will evaluate real technologies and their potential for transformation into a start-up company. Students may bring their own technology ideas to the class for assessment. Each class there will be a case study which will discuss examples of both success and failure in technology commercialization. Many of these case studies examine Boston University spin-out companies, and the founders and CEO?s of these ventures will share their experiences with the class. The course is listed in a number of schools of the University and attracts a diverse mix of students including MBA students, law school students, scientists, engineers and clinicians. This diversity of interest adds significantly to the learning experience.

  • Design Thinking and Innovation (QSTSI839)

    This class will examine how managers and leaders can create the conditions for innovation at the individual, team and organizational levels - and how those conditions differ for startup and mature organizations. Managing innovation includes the generation of ideas; the integration of ideas into new product concepts; and the commercialization of ideas. While core strategy courses address the questions of what innovations to pursue and whether and when those innovations will bring value, this course addresses the question of how managers can create organizations to deliver innovations of value. Thus, the course will focus on the practices and processes that mangers need to put in place to enable organizations to execute on an innovation strategy. In doing so, students will evaluate how to balance the challenges of organizing, managing and leading innovation with the need to produce concrete, routine and expected outcomes within the organization. To be innovative, any new idea must resolve the innovation paradox - introducing enough novelty to appeal to new markets while retaining enough familiarity to tap into existing behaviors. Because design and innovation are frequently inseparable in managing this paradox, the class will assess how design contributes to innovation in product, process and business models across industry sectors. The course will also consider the role that all sources of innovation play - including communities, networks, brokers and other forms of open innovation. Students will be asked to reflect upon innovations that have been critical to their lives, and how these innovations were produced and gained market traction. Final group projects will explore how to "rescue" innovations in trouble with turnaround teams.

  • Technology Strategy (QSTSI845)

    Technology Strategy focuses on the interface between technological innovation and strategic management. This advanced strategy course covers the tools and concepts needed to understand how technological change creates new markets and new wealth; how technology-intensive industries differ from other industries; and the type of capabilities that technology-based firms need at different stages of their rapidly evolving industries. Some of the key topics covered include: platform dynamics and business models, standards wars, technology diffusion, technological discontinuities and disruptive innovation, models of industry evolution, dominant technological designs, complementary assets needed to profit from an innovation, and mechanisms to protect intellectual property. The course provides a rigorous treatment of the topics covered, combined with hands-on exercises and projects to help students apply the concepts to specific companies and technologies. Teaching methodology is a combination of interactive class discussions, online simulations, digital multimedia cases, paper-based cases, and guest speakers from industry. The course has been designed to provide students with a solid foundation of theories, tools, techniques and practices that will allow them to understand how to compete successfully in technology- intensive environments.

  • Strategies for Bringing Technology to Market (QSTSI871)

    Strategies for Bringing Technology to Market is a unique course that guides student teams as they undertake commercial go-to-market strategy for scientific and engineering breakthroughs. By collaborating with faculty and graduate students in the University's research labs and mentors from the business community, teams will assess the economic and social prospects of recent technology innovations, outline the technical and market risks and the key commercial milestones and make recommendations for the most effective commercialization strategy. 

Project work is supported by lectures that focus on critical skills required. Guidance will be provided in assessing critical commercialization milestones by a combination of faculty and mentors from the business community.

  • Entrepreneurial Sales Strategy (QSTSI874)

    Focusing on sales strategy and execution as one of the most critical success factors in building entrepreneurial ventures, the course will enable students to develop the practical knowledge and specific skills necessary to maximize top-line revenue growth for emerging companies. Topics to be covered include direct, indirect and channel sales strategies; implementing pipeline management principles and forecasting techniques; the use of technology in selling; building a sales organization; and the development of strategic partners and alliances. Also covered are the use of sales tools and skills (presentation, negotiation, territory management, and pipeline development), building successful channel partners, and the keys to successful selling including solution selling vs. product selling.

Energy and Sustainability

  • Clean Technologies and Supply Chains (QSTOM845)

    The clean technology industry is one of the largest sectors of the economy and yet still undergoing significant growth and attracting a plethora of new entrants. It has been characterized by a great deal of experimentation around new technologies and around business models in the face of regulatory and market place disruptions. The course uses a combination of cases, simulation and analytical exercises to review trends and their co-evolution within the clean technology/energy eco-system. It aims to build a skill set around risk and opportunity assessment, and allied implementation challenges. This course is aligned with the requirements of the Entrepreneurship, PNP and Strategy concentrations.

  • Foundations of Environmental Sustainability (QSTSI836)

    The changing relationship between business and the natural environment offers both challenges and opportunities for firms. In this course we will discuss many facets of business, including financing, risk management, measurement, competitive positioning, innovation, and strategy in the context of increasing pressures for improved environmental sustainability. The course will be interactive and discussion-oriented, with a case discussion in most class sessions, supplemented by debates, simulation exercises, visitors, student presentations, discussions of recent news articles, and mini-lectures. The course is appropriate for all students interested in how demands for sustainability will continue to change the business environment.

  • Strategies for Sustainable Development (QSTSI870)

    SI870: Strategies for Sustainable Development is an advanced strategy course that explores the analysis, conceptualization and development of innovative, market-based solutions for sustainable development challenges for a future defined by natural resource, environmental and biological constraints. Specifically, the course the explores 1) the complex global context for sustainable development, 2) key stakeholders, 3) the emergent strategy (entrepreneurial) development process, method and practice, and 4) the structure, governance, and financing/microeconomics of new, emergent organizational forms and business models for sustainable development, such as cross-sector cooperative alliances, public-private partnerships with a particular focus multi-stakeholder platforms. Note: Market-based solutions for sustainable development are economically self-sustaining alternatives to traditional governmentally-funded or aid-based programs for addressing systemic social, economic and environmental problems. These solutions engage public, private, NGO and civil society actors and employ a variety in emerging organizational forms (both for profit and non-profit), innovative business models and strategies to deliver effective solutions at scale. The course takes a stakeholder-oriented, system-of-systems approach to the issues of sustainable development with a specific focus on the network of interrelated actors and interdependent issues within the class of "wicked problems"; .i.e. social, economic or environmental problems that are difficult to frame, scope and seemingly insoluble because of incomplete, contradictory, and changing requirements. Cases, readings, video and lectures will establish global context and sustainable development worldview across nine countries; Brazil, China, India, Israel, Japan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, and South Africa, and explore solutions to a range of issues from energy, food, water and climate change to health, education, economic inclusion, gender equity, security, organized crime and the informal. Students will work in teams to initially identify, frame and scope a complex, global sustainable development challenge and then work throughout the semester to research, conceptualized, evaluate and propose a global initiative for a market-based solution to that challenge.

Marketing and Digital Media

  • Engaging Consumers in a Digital World (QSTMK845)

    Social media technologies are continuously transforming the ways consumers interact with each other and firms. These changes constitute a fundamental shift in the marketplace--consumers have greater opportunities to voice their opinions and connect with other consumers as well as increased influence over marketers and brands. In this course, we examine how organizations capitalize on social media and these consumer-to-consumer interactions to support their marketing efforts. Specifically, we'll examine (a) how social media can be used to listen to consumers and monitor their behavior; (b) developing and delivering content that engages consumers; and (c) how to track the effectiveness of these efforts. Finally, we'll explore how to manage both the internal and external dimensions of social media engagement. We view these issues from a strategic and a practical perspective, rather than a technical or platform perspective. We examine these topics using a hands-on approach, including live cases, personal engagement in social media, and a team project.

  • Data Driven Marketing Decisions (QSTMK852)

    This course will focus on developing marketing strategies driven by marketing analytics. Topics covered include market segmentation, targeting, and positioning, and new product development. The course will draw on and extend students' understanding of issues related to quantitative analysis and principles of marketing. The course will use a combination of cases, lectures, and a hands-on project to develop these skills.

  • Branding (QSTMK854)

    This is a course about branding, and the ways that brands acquire and sustain value in the marketplace. Cases, readings, in-class discussions, and team/individual assignments are designed to provide: An appreciation of the strategic discipline of branding and its role in creating shareholder value; an understanding of brands as co-creations of consumers, marketers, and cultures, and brand management as a collaborative process of meaning management; a sound foundation in consumer-brand behavior to inform brand decisions; and a capacity to think creatively and precisely about the strategies and tactics involved in building, leveraging, defending, and sustaining strong brands. Select topics may include brand equity, brand (re)positioning, brand relationships, brand loyalty, brand community, open source branding, branded entertainment and other cultural branding strategies, internal branding, brand architecture design and portfolio strategy, brand leverage and extensions, brand metrics, crisis management, and brand stewardship. Guest speakers from branding services, consulting, and practice provide insights throughout the course. While this course has obvious relevance for those contemplating brand management careers in product or service markets, it is appropriate for a range of future professionals within for-profit and not-for-profit C2C and B2B worlds, and others who share a simple passion for branding.

  • Consumer Insights (QSTMK856)

    Marketing, in particular, begins and ends with the consumer -- from determining consumer needs to ensuring customer satisfaction. In this course, we will explore the most recent scientific research in marketing, psychology, and behavioral economics related to consumer behavior. We will develop your ability to understand and influence what people want, how people decide what and when to buy, and whether people will be satisfied or dissatisfied with their decisions. These psychological insights are particularly useful for marketing strategy, brand positioning, and marketing communication decisions, but also yield insight into common biases in judgment and decision making, beyond marketing, to which you would otherwise fall prey. Why people are willing to drive across town to save $5 on a tank of gasoline, for example, when they would not drive a minute to save $5 on a refrigerator. We will discuss some of these applications in class. In addition, we will examine the methodology of market research (specific to consumer behavior) to build the tools you will need to interpret and base decisions on it. Readings will include primary empirical research articles (e.g., Journal of Consumer Research articles), business journal articles, and research reviews (e.g., Harvard Business Review articles). The course includes lecture, discussion, an exam, and a team term project.

  • Services Marketing and Management (QSTMK857)

    This course concentrates on the role of marketing in managing services. Services have the fastest job growth of any sector in the U.S. with similar growth rates in other developed countries. The strategic application of marketing requires cross-functional integration; this is particularly true when one speaks about the marketing of services. You should expect to be addressing human resource, information management, operational, and financial overlaps with marketing throughout the course. The strategic focus includes leadership and culture, management of supplementary vs. core services, service communities, positioning and contrary positioning (breaking industry traditions), service failures (customer defection, employee cycle of failure, and customer apartheid. The primary course assignment is an end-of-semester service analysis and recommendation paper; students are encouraged to analyze a company or SBU where they would like to work in the future. This paper has served as an entryway to a desired job for students in the past.

  • Business Marketing (QSTMK859)

    This course provides an in-depth understanding of the unique aspects of marketing in a business-to-business environment. Students apply current marketing theory and techniques to industrial market settings. In addition, they develop managerial skills in the marketing planning and execution process, as well as critical analysis and problem-solving abilities with respect to marketing working relationships. The course allows participants to experiment with and apply strategic marketing concepts in a complex industrial marketing environment. Topics covered include the dynamics of relationships between suppliers and customers, the increasing reliance on the marketing-/R&D interface, the structuring of alliances between so-called competitors, and the process of negotiations - to better understand how organizations endeavor to become and stay market-oriented. The course has some guest speakers and an interactive marketing simulation.

  • Pricing Strategy and Tactics (QSTMK864)

    This course focuses on the practical needs of the marketing manager making pricing decisions. Students learn the techniques of strategic analysis necessary to price more profitably by evaluating the price sensitivity of buyers, determining relevant costs, anticipating and influencing competitors' pricing and formulating an appropriate pricing strategy.

  • Retailing and Omni-Channel Marketing (QSTMK875)

    This course provides the student with a comprehensive view of the activities involved in retailing and omni?]channel marketing from a consumer?]facing perspective. We will study key retailing decisions, including selection of retail site locations, merchandising, pricing, store management, layout, and design, and customer service and experience management both within the bricks and mortar setting as well as online and by phone. We will also explore the global nature of supply chain management in retail strategy and operations. We will examine how technology impacts these decisions--including mobile capabilities and effect on retailer pricing strategies, fast fashion, and the need to manage and coordinate service across multiple channels.

Strategy and Consulting

  • Machine Learning for Business Analytics (QSTMK842)

    This course introduces students to machine learning techniques that can be used to analyze business data. Through a series of lectures and projects, students will learn about modern machine learning algorithms, how to use these algorithms in the R programming language, derive actionable insights from data, and effectively communicate their findings to a business audience. The goal of the course is to bridge the gap between managers and data-scientists by creating an understanding of modern analytics methods, and the types of business problems to which they can be applied. No prior programming skill are required. The course was previously offered under the title "Digital Marketing Analytics," but does not overlap with MK876; students may take both courses for credit.

  • Intellectual Property Strategies (QSTSI814)

    This course covers the ways in which companies use intellectual property to protect their investments in knowledge assets. Traditionally a concern for technology-intensive businesses, patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets have become important business tools throughout the knowledge-based economy. A good understanding of what IP assets are and how they work has become essential for managers in all types of organizations. This is not a law course, nor a how-to manual rather it is intended to develop your analytical understanding of fundamental economic and legal aspects of intellectual property systems, and how they drive competition and strategy.

  • Competitive Decision Making (QSTPL815)

    This course explores the strategies of decision-makers in a variety of competitive situations. The main topics apply game theory in a number of settings: 1) market competition; 2) competitive bidding; 3) bargaining, negotiation, and arbitration; and 4) group decisions in organizations. In most of these settings, optimal decisions call for cooperation as well as competition. Examples are drawn from a wide variety of managerial settings. Extensive use is made of interactive exercises, games, and simulations. OB 853 and PL 815 take complementary approaches to the study of negotiation. The former emphasizes key psychological, interpersonal, and organizational insights, while the latter focuses on economic factors and strategies. Students are free to take both courses.

  • Design Thinking and Innovation (QSTSI839)

    This class will examine how managers and leaders can create the conditions for innovation at the individual, team and organizational levels - and how those conditions differ for startup and mature organizations. Managing innovation includes the generation of ideas; the integration of ideas into new product concepts; and the commercialization of ideas. While core strategy courses address the questions of what innovations to pursue and whether and when those innovations will bring value, this course addresses the question of how managers can create organizations to deliver innovations of value. Thus, the course will focus on the practices and processes that mangers need to put in place to enable organizations to execute on an innovation strategy. In doing so, students will evaluate how to balance the challenges of organizing, managing and leading innovation with the need to produce concrete, routine and expected outcomes within the organization. To be innovative, any new idea must resolve the innovation paradox - introducing enough novelty to appeal to new markets while retaining enough familiarity to tap into existing behaviors. Because design and innovation are frequently inseparable in managing this paradox, the class will assess how design contributes to innovation in product, process and business models across industry sectors. The course will also consider the role that all sources of innovation play - including communities, networks, brokers and other forms of open innovation. Students will be asked to reflect upon innovations that have been critical to their lives, and how these innovations were produced and gained market traction. Final group projects will explore how to "rescue" innovations in trouble with turnaround teams.

  • Technology Strategy (QSTSI845)

    Technology Strategy focuses on the interface between technological innovation and strategic management. This advanced strategy course covers the tools and concepts needed to understand how technological change creates new markets and new wealth; how technology-intensive industries differ from other industries; and the type of capabilities that technology-based firms need at different stages of their rapidly evolving industries. Some of the key topics covered include: platform dynamics and business models, standards wars, technology diffusion, technological discontinuities and disruptive innovation, models of industry evolution, dominant technological designs, complementary assets needed to profit from an innovation, and mechanisms to protect intellectual property. The course provides a rigorous treatment of the topics covered, combined with hands-on exercises and projects to help students apply the concepts to specific companies and technologies. Teaching methodology is a combination of interactive class discussions, online simulations, digital multimedia cases, paper-based cases, and guest speakers from industry. The course has been designed to provide students with a solid foundation of theories, tools, techniques and practices that will allow them to understand how to compete successfully in technology- intensive environments.

  • Strategy Implementation (QSTSI859)

    Gain the skills and know-how to manage up and across your organization, passing the normal organizational tests along the way from technical expert to cross-functional integrator to directing the future course of your organization. This is strategy implementation for the middle manager who needs to 1) size-up the situation and 2) determine how to gain the power needed to achieve their objectives. One of the qualitative factors that will be explored in great detail is personal style choice vis a vis different stakeholders and organizational politics and the resultant perceptions of you and your programs. Students will study both successful and less-successful managers through cases and readings, honing their own, personal managerial style.

  • Strategies for Bringing Technology to Market (QSTSI871)

    Strategies for Bringing Technology to Market is a unique course that guides student teams as they undertake commercial go-to-market strategy for scientific and engineering breakthroughs. By collaborating with faculty and graduate students in the University's research labs and mentors from the business community, teams will assess the economic and social prospects of recent technology innovations, outline the technical and market risks and the key commercial milestones and make recommendations for the most effective commercialization strategy. 

Project work is supported by lectures that focus on critical skills required. Guidance will be provided in assessing critical commercialization milestones by a combination of faculty and mentors from the business community.

Family-led Businesses

  • Managing Organizational Change (QSTOB844)

    In this course, we will explore the theory and practice of creating organizational change, with an emphasis on how "insiders" can create desired organizational change. By the end of the course, students should be more capable facilitators of change; sensitive to the nuances of change and more knowledgeable and wise about its enactment. To enable this, we will examine how people recognize challenges in situations and possibilities for change, and adopt an experimental and deliberative attitude to try and solve them. When successful, such collective initiatives encourage meaningful contribution of stakeholders, foster human development and achieve organizational outcomes. The course sessions will be highly experiential. We will confront situations of change via simulations, exercises, personal projects, and team-based organizational projects. We will connect these experiences of change with theories of change to generate a richer understanding of the mechanisms of change at our disposal, and the integrative/disintegrative conditions that shape change trajectories. This course is particularly relevant for those wishing to develop their leadership and consultation capabilities.

  • The Leadership Challenge (QSTOB848)

    This course examines the essence of leadership; its relationship to managing; and the behaviors, attitudes and perspectives that distinguish leaders. Leadership is considered in a variety of ways: leadership in crises, at the top, in the middle, and in groups. Case studies, students' past experiences, instruments, and other learning activities provide opportunities for students to assess and develop their leadership talents.

  • Design Thinking and Innovation (QSTSI839)

    This class will examine how managers and leaders can create the conditions for innovation at the individual, team and organizational levels - and how those conditions differ for startup and mature organizations. Managing innovation includes the generation of ideas; the integration of ideas into new product concepts; and the commercialization of ideas. While core strategy courses address the questions of what innovations to pursue and whether and when those innovations will bring value, this course addresses the question of how managers can create organizations to deliver innovations of value. Thus, the course will focus on the practices and processes that mangers need to put in place to enable organizations to execute on an innovation strategy. In doing so, students will evaluate how to balance the challenges of organizing, managing and leading innovation with the need to produce concrete, routine and expected outcomes within the organization. To be innovative, any new idea must resolve the innovation paradox - introducing enough novelty to appeal to new markets while retaining enough familiarity to tap into existing behaviors. Because design and innovation are frequently inseparable in managing this paradox, the class will assess how design contributes to innovation in product, process and business models across industry sectors. The course will also consider the role that all sources of innovation play - including communities, networks, brokers and other forms of open innovation. Students will be asked to reflect upon innovations that have been critical to their lives, and how these innovations were produced and gained market traction. Final group projects will explore how to "rescue" innovations in trouble with turnaround teams.

  • Entrepreneurial Sales Strategy (QSTSI874)

    Focusing on sales strategy and execution as one of the most critical success factors in building entrepreneurial ventures, the course will enable students to develop the practical knowledge and specific skills necessary to maximize top-line revenue growth for emerging companies. Topics to be covered include direct, indirect and channel sales strategies; implementing pipeline management principles and forecasting techniques; the use of technology in selling; building a sales organization; and the development of strategic partners and alliances. Also covered are the use of sales tools and skills (presentation, negotiation, territory management, and pipeline development), building successful channel partners, and the keys to successful selling including solution selling vs. product selling.

Real Estate Development

  • Negotiations (QSTOB853)

    This course uses the theory and research on effective negotiating strategies to build students' understanding of, and skills for, managing differences and negotiation situations. The course considers, among other topics, the issues of negotiating across functions, between levels, across national and cultural differences, over race and gender differences, and between organizations. Students examine: 1) problems of influence and self-defense in highly competitive "hardball" negotiations; and 2) the art of using differences for creative problem-solving and "mutual gain" outcomes. The emphasis is on developing practical skills for effective negotiations that can be applied to concrete situations. Students should be prepared to learn from their own experiences and practice in this course.

  • Real Estate Management (QSTSI835)

    This is an introductory course that covers the basics of real estate investing and managing. Subject materials include mortgages, lenders, forms of ownership, tax laws effecting real property, financial analysis and valuation techniques.

  • Real Estate Development (QSTSI842)

    The course provides a framework for evaluating the aspects underlying successful real estate development from concept and feasibility, through site control to regulatory review and construction. The course is taught utilizing class discussion, cases and outside speakers to reinforce the functional areas in the development process.