Career Development Professorships

Overview

classroom Each year, Boston University recognizes a handful of talented junior educators emerging as future leaders within their respective fields through the award of Career Development Professorships. Made possible by the generous support of distinguished donors, alumni, and BU’s Office of Technology Development, these professorships highlight the caliber, potential, and continued vitality of Boston University’s diverse faculty.

Awards, nominating procedures, and selection vary based on the professorship and the unit administering the honor.  All awards are three years in length and include support for the recipients’ salaries and/or research and scholarly work.

  • Peter Paul Career Development Professorships are awarded University-wide.
  • The Stuart and Elizabeth Pratt Career Development Professorship highlights excellence within the College of Arts & Sciences.
  • The Reidy Family Career Development Professorship recognizes faculty members in the College of Engineering and the Questrom School of Business.
  • The Ralph Edwards Career Development Professorship focuses specifically within the School of Medicine.
  • Innovation Career Development Professorships recognize those whose translational research is likely to lead to future licensed technology.
  • East Asia Studies Career Development Professorships recognize junior faculty in the College of Arts & Sciences, the College of Fine Arts, the College of Communication, the Pardee School of Global Studies, and the Questrom School of Business whose research is specific to East Asia.
  • The Aram V. Chobanian Assistant Professorship recognizes outstanding junior faculty in the School of Medicine.
  • The Peter J. Levine Career Development Professorship supports rising junior faculty in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering within the College of Engineering.
  • The Moorman-Simon Interdisciplinary Career Development Professorship recognizes a faculty member who is conducting truly interdisciplinary work and either holds or has the potential to hold appointments in multiple schools and colleges at BU.
  • The Isabel Anderson Career Development Professorship supports the scholarship of a faculty member in the Questrom School of Business.
  • The University Provost’s Career Development Professorship rotates its focus annually and for 2017-2018 advances the participation and success of women in the field of life sciences.

Current Career Development Professors

2017-2020


Peter Paul Career Development Professors

Travis Bristol

Assistant Professor of English Education, School of Education

Travis Bristol’s research examines race and gender in schools, including district and school-based practices that support teachers of color, and policies that enable and constrain the workplace experiences and retention for teachers of color. He received his doctorate in education policy from Columbia University, a master’s degree in education from Stanford University, and a bachelor’s degree in English from Amherst College.

Daniella Kupor

Assistant Professor of Marketing, Questrom School of Business

Daniella Kupor’s research studies areas of decision making and consumer persuasion, investigating how external factors – including interruptions, messaging, and other situational variables – help to shape choices and risk judgements. She holds a doctorate in marketing from Stanford University and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Brown University.

Rory Van Loo

Associate Professor of Law, School of Law

An expert in digital markets, Rory Van Loo focuses his research on consumer transactions, with particular interest in the intersection between technology and regulation. He received his law degree from Harvard Law School and holds a doctorate from Yale University and a bachelor’s degree from Pomona College.


Moorman-Simon Interdisciplinary Career Development Professorship

Allyson Sgro

Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering

Allyson Sgro’s translational research bridges biology and technology, exploring how cells work together and make group decisions to perform complex behaviors such as assembling into a tissue, forming a biofilm, healing a wound, or developing into different cell types. She holds a doctorate and master’s degree in chemistry from University of Washington and received her bachelor’s degree in chemistry and pre-medical studies from Bard College at Simon’s Rock. She completed her postdoctoral training at Princeton University.


University Provost’s Career Development Professorship

Xi Ling

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, College of Arts & Sciences
Assistant Professor of Materials Science & Engineering, College of Engineering

Xi Ling’s multidisciplinary research in nanoscience works to synthesize new two-dimensional nanomaterials, reveal their physical nature through spectroscopy, and ultimately develop them into novel, high-performance, flexible devices for use in energy conversion and chemical sensing. She holds a doctorate in physical chemistry from Peking University and bachelor’s degrees in chemistry and chemical engineering from Lanzhou University in China. She completed her postdoctoral training at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Innovation Career Development Professorship

Miloš Popović

Assistant Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering, College of Engineering

Miloš Popović’s research and design work in silicon chip technology employs first-principles theory and photonics at the micro- and nanoscale to create integrated systems-on-chip that enable new modes of communication, computation, signal processing, and sensing. He received his doctorate in electrical engineering and completed his postdoctoral training at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and holds a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Queen’s University in Canada.

Emily Whiting

Assistant Professor of Computer Science, College of Arts & Sciences

A specialist in computer graphics, Emily Whiting uses her research in architectural geometry, computer-aided design, and 3D fabrication for numerous applications – from building masonry to the manufacture of materials – to help bridge the gap between geometric modeling, structural engineering, and design. She holds a doctorate in computer graphics and building technology and a master’s degree in design and computation from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a bachelor’s degree in engineering science from University of Toronto. She completed her postdoctoral work at ETH (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) Zurich.


2016-2019

Peter Paul Career Development Professors

Charles Chang

Assistant Professor of Linguistics, College of Arts & Sciences

Charles Chang’s research explores language acquisition, focusing on the ways in which individuals’ native languages both influence, and are influenced by, the phonological systems of heritage or later learned languages. He is a graduate of Harvard University and received his doctorate and master’s degree in linguistics from the University of California, Berkeley, as well as a Master of Philosophy in English and Applied Linguistics from the University of Cambridge.

Daniel Cifuentes

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry, School of Medicine

A biochemist and developmental biologist, Daniel Cifuentes examines the early stages of embryo formation and the role of RNA during this period, using research on zebrafish to yield new insights into basic mechanisms of development. He is a graduate of the University of Barcelona (Spain), where he also received his doctorate in biochemistry. He completed his postdoctoral training at Yale University.

Arturo Vegas

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, College of Arts & Sciences

Arturo Vegas uses his research in synthetic chemistry to develop novel chemical tools, materials, and approaches for targeting therapeutics to diseased tissues, with an emphasis on cancer and diabetes. He holds a doctorate in chemistry from Harvard University and received his bachelor’s degree in biology from Cornell University.


Stuart and Elizabeth Pratt Career Development Professorship

Jerry Chen

Assistant Professor of Biology, College of Arts & Sciences

Jerry Chen’s research in neuroscience uses the sensory input from the whiskers in mice to study the relationship between local circuits and long-range networks in the neocortex and better understand the central nervous system in mammals.  He received his doctorate in biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his bachelor’s degree in molecular and cell biology from the University of California, Berkeley.


Reidy Family Career Development Professorship

John Ngo

Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering

John Ngo’s translational research bridges cell biology, biotechnology, and nanotechnology to develop new tools for managing biomolecules in living cells and organisms and reveal new insights into cellular function and disease. A graduate of the University California, Santa Barbara, he received his doctorate in biochemistry and molecular biophysics from California Institute of Technology.


Ralph Edwards Career Development Professorship

Joshua Campbell

Assistant Professor of Medicine (Computational Biomedicine), School of Medicine

Using bioinformatics, Joshua Campbell’s research in DNA and RNA sequencing works to help detect and treat lung cancer and COPD at an earlier stage by identifying unique genomic mutations and then targeting them with novel therapies. He received his doctorate in bioinformatics from Boston University and his bachelor’s degree in computer science, mathematics, and biology from Anderson (IN) University. He completed his postdoctoral training at Boston University.


Moorman-Simon Interdisciplinary Career Development Professorship

Keith Brown

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering
Assistant Professor of Physics, College of Arts & Sciences

An expert in manufacture and transport processes at the nanoscale, Keith Brown focuses his multidisciplinary research on soft materials – liquids, polymers, emulsions, and gels – and how their makeup affects the way light, heat, electrons, and molecules can move through a system. He received his doctorate and master’s degrees in physics from Harvard University, and holds a bachelor’s degree in physics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Isabel Anderson Career Development Professorship

Marcus Bellamy

Assistant Professor of Operations & Technology Management, Questrom School of Business

Marcus Bellamy’s research in supply chain management uses analytics and visualization techniques to help businesses reveal and understand clusters, patterns, trends, and outliers of supply chain innovation not necessarily identified through traditional methods. He received his doctorate and master’s degree, respectively, in operations management and industrial and systems engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of New Mexico.


University Provost’s Career Development Professorship

Jessica Simes

Assistant Professor of Sociology, College of Arts & Sciences

Jessica Simes’s research merges studies of urban inequality and poverty with computational thinking, using innovative data-analysis techniques to better understand the widespread mass incarceration concentrated in disadvantaged communities. A graduate of Occidental College, she holds a doctorate and master’s degree in sociology from Harvard University.


2015-2018

Peter Paul Career Development Professors

Angela Robertson Bazzi

Assistant Professor of Community Health Sciences, School of Public Health

Angela Robertson Bazzi’s research explores social and structural determinants of disparities in infectious diseases, focusing on drug use and sex risk behaviors among populations both in the U.S.-Mexico border region and in the Boston area. She is a graduate of the University of Southern California and received her master’s degree in public health from Johns Hopkins University and her doctorate in public health from University of California, San Diego.

Sam Ling

Assistant Professor of Psychological & Brain Sciences, College of Arts & Sciences

A computational neuroscientist, Sam Ling uses numerous approaches, including psychophysics and functional magnetic resonance imaging, to better understand how the brain perceives and consciously experiences the visual world. He is a graduate of Pennsylvania State University, received his doctorate in psychology from New York University, and completed his postdoctoral work at Vanderbilt University.

Elizabeth (Bess) Rouse

Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior, Questrom School of Business

Bess Rouse’s research examines the role of social interactions in the creative process, drawing on identity and ownership theories to understand how creative workers psychologically attach and detach from the products they make. She is a graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and received her master’s degree in organization studies and her doctorate in management and organization from Boston College.

Jennifer Talbot

Assistant Professor of Biology, College of Arts & Sciences

A microbial biologist, Jennifer Talbot utilizes biochemical analysis and advanced sequencing technologies to help uncover the unique mechanisms microbes use to process carbon and nutrients through ecosystems. She is a graduate of Boston University, received her doctorate in biological sciences from University of California, Irvine, and completed her postdoctoral research at Stanford University.


East Asia Studies Career Development Professors

Lei Guo

Assistant Professor of Mass Communication, Advertising and Public Relations, and member of the Division of Emerging Media Studies, College of Communication

Lei Guo’s scholarship in cross-cultural journalism explores the role of new media technologies as agents of democratic development in China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, utilizing social networks as data science tools to provide a clearer understanding of East Asian culture. She is a graduate of Fudan University in Shanghai and received her master’s degree and doctorate in journalism from University of Texas at Austin.

Julie Klinger

Assistant Professor of International Studies, Pardee School of Global Studies

Julie Klinger’s in-depth fieldwork in global geography examines rare earth prospecting and mining, with special emphasis on the development and geopolitics of resource frontiers in China, Brazil, and Outer Space, and their impact on local populations and environments. She is a graduate of both Columbia University and Sarah Lawrence College, holds a certificate in China studies from Johns Hopkins University, and received her doctorate in geography from the University of California, Berkeley.


Aram V. Chobanian Assistant Professorship

Neil Ganem

Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Medicine, School of Medicine

Neil Ganem’s research in cancer cell biology uses a variety of novel methods – including high-resolution microscopy and bioinformatics – to study the causes and consequences of genome instability in human cancer and to define the tumor suppression mechanisms that limit the proliferation of highly abnormal aneuploid cells. He is a graduate of the University of New Hampshire, received his doctorate in biochemistry from Dartmouth College and completed his postdoctoral research in pediatric oncology at Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Harvard Medical School.


Peter J. Levine Career Development Professorship

Brian Kulis

Assistant Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering, College of Engineering

An expert in computer vision applications, Brian Kulis works to devise new methods that make it easier to analyze large-scale data, with a focus on helping resolve core problems in machine learning, including metric learning, content-based search, clustering, and online learning. A graduate of Cornell University, he received his doctorate in computer science from University of Texas at Austin and completed his postdoctoral research at the University of California, Berkeley.

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