Arabic Programs

Rabat Intensive Arabic Language Program

Location: Rabat, Morocco

Dates: May – July 2016 (8 weeks)

Project GO-BU scholars on a day trip to the Sahara Desert, Summer 2015. Photo by Stefania Cotei

Project GO-BU scholars on a sojourn to the Sahara Desert, Summer 2015.
Photo by Stefania Cotei

The Rabat Intensive Arabic Language Program offers a full year’s worth of intensive Arabic language study and an immersion introduction to Moroccan and North African culture. Students will be studying Fus’ha (Modern Standard Arabic) at the Center for Cross Cultural Learning (CCCL), a private cultural institution founded and directed by Moroccan academics with many years of experience in cross-cultural education. This program will give students a unique immersion in the life and society of this fascinating language, city, country, and region. All students are placed in Moroccan households in the medina (old city), where they have their own room and take meals with their hosts. Please note that because language proficiency is central to Project GO, our scholarships do not support enrollment in the Service Learning Program in Rabat (which includes just one semester’s worth of Arabic). By participating instead in the Intensive Arabic Language Program, Project GO-BU awardees complete a full year’s worth of Arabic in Rabat (8 units). Unfortunately Project GO-BU is not able to support complete beginners in Arabic at this time; but all you need to apply to the Morocco program is one year’s Arabic study. Program Info: Rabat Intensive Arabic Language Program (Summer)

A class excursion to Chefchaouen, Morocco. Photo by Project GO-BU Arabic scholar, Jeffrey Roberts, 2015.

A class excursion to Chefchaouen, Morocco. Photo by Project GO-BU Arabic scholar, Jeffrey Roberts, 2015.

Why study Arabic?

Arabic, the fifth most widely spoken language, is a major world language with over 280 million native speakers and 250 million nonnative speakers. It is mostly spoken in the Middle East and North Africa, a region of enormous strategic and economic importance. Arabic is the largest member of the Semitic language family. As the language of the Qur’an, Arabic is a crucial language for Muslims all over the world and is essential to their religious practice. Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) is essentially a modern version of Classical Arabic. It is a universal form of Arabic learned in schools across the Arab world and is used for all formal written as well as spoken communication, such as in radio and TV newscast, newspapers, magazines, documents, books, political speeches, lectures, mosques, etc. In addition, MSA is used in some Muslim countries mostly for religious purposes. Colloquial Arabic, on the other hand, is acquired as a native language and is used in all informal spoken communication among family members, friends, and acquaintances. Colloquial Arabic differs according to region and has many varieties.

Afternoon tea in Rabat. Photo by Project GO-BU Arabic scholar, Stefania Cotei. Summer 2015

Afternoon tea in Rabat. Photo by Project GO-BU Arabic scholar, Stefania Cotei. Summer 2015

Project GO-BU Boston University