Matthew Pillsbury
(New York, NY) www.matthewpillsbury.com and www.bonnibenrubi.com



Matthew Pillsbury (New York, NY), Desperate Housewives, Balboa Park Inn, The Orient Express Room, San Diego, Sunday, August 14th, 2005, 10 11pm, 2008, Archival pigment ink print, 30 x 40 inches, Courtesy of the artist and Bonni Benrubi Gallery, NYC



Matthew Pillsbury (New York, NY), Eric Watson, Paris, Thursday, March 11th, 2004, 7:40 8:40pm, 2007, Archival pigment ink print, 13 x 19 inches, Courtesy of the artist and Bonni Benrubi Gallery, NYC





Matthew Pillsbury (New York, NY), Alex Franklin, Project Gotham Racing, Las Vegas , Tuesday, November 22nd, 2005, 10:48 11:24pm, 2007, Archival pigment ink print, 13 x 19 inches, Courtesy of the artist and Bonni Benrubi Gallery, NYC





Matthew Pillsbury (New York, NY), Judy Pillsbury, Gosford Park , Sunday, March 9, 2003, 7 8 pm, 2007, Archival pigment ink print, 13 x 19 inches, Courtesy of the artist and Bonni Benrubi Gallery, NYC





Matthew Pillsbury (New York, NY), Cell phone on Venice Beach, Sunday, September 24, 2006, 6:58 7:09pm, 2008, Archival pigment ink print, 13 x 19 inches, Courtesy of the artist and Bonni Benrubi Gallery, NYC

Artist Statement

I am interested in capturing the importance that computers, televisions, and now cell phones have taken on in our lives. I found that we are often unaware of the increasing time we spend processing information, enjoying entertainment, and communicating electronically.

I make long exposure black and white photographs using only available light. The resulting images capture the evanescent record of the human activity. While this deprives us of the individual likenesses of my subjects, a different kind of photographic portrait emerges from the detailed presentation of the object and spaces, rendered in minute detail through the use of an 8x10 camera. With the room's inhabitants somewhat physically absent, the photographs edge toward the voyeuristic; the viewer enters spaces and can linger over the smallest details of these very specific interior landscapes.

Each of the images in this series is an open-ended reflection of our complex and evolving relationships with imaging, technology, culture, and to each other.