Dean Lutchen Elected President of National Biomedical Engineering Institute

By Michael G Seele

Kenneth R. Lutchen
Kenneth R. Lutchen

College of Engineering Dean Kenneth R. Lutchen was elected president of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) at the group’s annual meeting in Washington, DC, on Feb. 22. Dean Lutchen will lead the non-profit organization’s mission to advance public understanding of medical and biological engineering, and honor significant achievements in the field.

“It is a great pleasure to see such a talented individual take leadership of this dynamic organization,” said Lutchen’s predecessor in the AIMBE presidency, Thomas C. Skalak, vice president for research at the University of Virginia. “We look forward to Dr. Lutchen’s leadership and his ability to help AIMBE realize its vision to help the public understand the value of medical and biological engineering innovation to benefit society.”

During his year-long term as president, Lutchen will chair the AIMBE board of directors, which is elected by the institute’s College of Fellows, a body of distinguished academic leaders at major universities -- including professors recognized for their contributions to teaching, research and innovation -- as well as leaders in industry. AIMBE fellows have helped to revolutionize medicine, engineering and related fields that enhance and extend the lives of people all over the world.

AIMBE represents 90 university programs in medical and biological engineering, corporations and 16 professional societies engaged in advancing medical and biological engineering. The organization advocates for public policies that facilitate progress in medical and biological research, and for the development of products and services that benefit the public.

“I am honored to be elected president of AIMBE, an organization that shares my belief that medical and biological engineers should play a critical role in advancing society,” Dean Lutchen said. “I look forward to helping facilitate policies and innovations that help people.”

College of Engineering dean since 2006, Lutchen joined the Biomedical Engineering Department in 1984 and became its chairman in 1998. During his eight years as chairman, he led BME into the top echelon of biomedical engineering departments nationally. His research focuses on advancing methods for probing the structure-function relations governing lung disease, especially asthma. He has written more than 120 peer-reviewed journal articles.

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