Grinstaff, Wong, Zhang Named Inaugural Distinguished Faculty Fellows

By Jason L London



Associate Professors (from top) Xin Zhang (ME), Mark Grinstaff (BME) and Joyce Wong (BME) were announced as the inaugural Distinguished Faculty Fellows.
Associate Professors (from top) Xin Zhang (ME), Mark Grinstaff (BME) and Joyce Wong (BME) were announced as the inaugural Distinguished Faculty Fellows.

In an effort to further promote the work of mid-career faculty and honor those who have demonstrated extraordinary performance and impact in research, teaching and service, Dean Kenneth R. Lutchen has established the Distinguished Faculty Fellows Program. Associate Professors Mark Grinstaff (BME), Joyce Wong (BME) and Xin Zhang (ME) were announced as the inaugural Distinguished Faculty Fellows at the College’s December faculty meeting.

The Distinguished Faculty Fellows Award is given to tenured College of Engineering faculty who are on a clear trajectory toward exemplary leadership careers in all dimensions of science and engineering. The five-year appointment includes a discretionary fund for the faculty member’s laboratory.

Grinstaff joined Boston University in 2003 and has a joint appointment at the College of Engineering, College of Arts and Sciences, and the Medical School. His research focus includes biomaterials, tissue engineering, drug delivery, macromolecular chemistry and engineering, and nano-devices.

He is part of teams seeking to develop new treatments for osteoarthritis that includes non-invasive detection techniques and a creating a biopolymer that serves as a joint bio-lubricant. He is also working with researchers at Brigham & Women’s Hospital to create chemotherapy-eluting strips for the prevention of locally recurrent lung cancer.

Wong joined the College of Engineering in 1998. She is the associate chair for graduate studies in Biomedical Engineering and principal investigator at the College’s Biomimetic Materials Engineering Laboratory. Her research focuses on the development of biomaterials to probe how structure, material properties and composition of the cell-biomaterial interface affect fundamental cellular processes.

A recipient of a NSF CAREER Award and a Dupont Young Professor Award, her current projects include tissue engineering of small diameter blood vessels and development of targeted nano- and micro-particle contrast agents for multi-modal detection of vulnerable plaque.

A member of the College of Engineering since 2002, Xin Zhang is the associate chair of graduate programs in Mechanical Engineering. Her research interests include MEMS and NEMS, micro- and nano-mechanics manufacturing, and biotechnology. A member of the Boston University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, she was the first recipient of the Fraunhofer Assistant Professorship awarded by the Fraunhofer USA Center for Manufacturing Innovation.

Zhang received the NSF CAREER Award in 2003 and was recognized by the National Academy of Engineering as one of the country’s top engineers between the ages of 30 and 45 in 2007. 

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